Hitting for the cycle

In baseball, hitting for the cycle is the accomplishment of one batter hitting a single, a double, a triple, and a home run in the same game. Collecting the hits in that order is known as a "natural cycle".[1] Cycles are semi-rare in Major League Baseball (MLB), having occurred only 327 times, starting with Curry Foley in 1882.[2][3] The most recent example was accomplished by Jake Bauers of the Cleveland Indians on June 14, 2019, against the Detroit Tigers.[4] The Miami Marlins are the only current MLB franchise who have never had a player hit for the cycle.[5]

Curry Foley cropped
Curry Foley was the first player in Major League Baseball history to hit for the cycle, in 1882 for the Buffalo Bisons.
Harry H. Davis
Harry Davis hit the first cycle in American League history, in 1901 for the Philadelphia Athletics.

Rarity

The cycle is about as uncommon as a no-hitter;[6][7] it has been called "one of the rarest"[8] and "most difficult feats"[9] in baseball. Based on 2009 offensive levels, the probability of an average MLB player hitting for a cycle against an average team in a game is approximately 0.00590%; this corresponds to about 2​12 cycles in a 162-game season with 30 teams.[10] The most cycles hit in a single major league season is eight, which occurred in both 1933 and 2009.[3]

In other baseball leagues, the cycle is achieved less frequently. Through May 2019, there have been 74 cycles hit in Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB),[11] the top-level baseball organization in Japan, the most recent being by Umeno Ryutaro on April 9, 2019.[12] One NPB player, Atsuya Furuta, has also hit for the cycle in an NPB All-Star game. No player has ever hit for the cycle in the MLB All-Star Game.[13] One MLB player has hit for the cycle in a postseason game, Brock Holt of the Boston Red Sox in Game 3 of the 2018 ALDS.[14]

Two players have hit for the cycle on the same day once in NPB history; this has occurred twice in MLB history. There have never been multiple cycles completed in a single MLB or NPB game; this is known to have occurred twice in Minor League Baseball — on April 11, 2018, by Gio Brusa and Jalen Miller of the Class A-Advanced San Jose Giants,[15] and on August 7, 2018, by Kevin Newman and Jacob Stallings of the Triple-A Indianapolis Indians.[16]

A "home run cycle"—hitting home runs with zero, one, two, and three runners on base, all in the same game—has not been accomplished in MLB; as of May 2019, only 18 players have hit four home runs in an MLB game, and only twice has one of the home runs been a grand slam. The home run cycle has been accomplished at other levels of play, examples include: Minor League Baseball, in July 1998 by a player for the Arkansas Travelers;[17] college softball, in April 2011 by a player for the Florida State Seminoles[18] and in February 2019 by a player for the Arkansas Razorbacks;[19] high school baseball, in April 2019 by a player for Perrysburg High School in Ohio;[20] and Little League Baseball, in June 2014 by a player in Elkton, Maryland.[21]

Components

Michihiro Ogasawara 2010
Michihiro Ogasawara hit the only cycle in Nippon Professional Baseball during 2008.

Single

Pursuant to Major League Baseball (MLB) Rule 6.09(a), "[the] batter becomes a runner when he hits a fair ball".[22] The single—in which the batter reaches first base without being put out, and without the benefit of a fielding error—is the most common type of hit in baseball: for example, there were 25,838 singles hit during the 1988 MLB season, compared to 6,386 doubles, 840 triples, or 3,180 home runs.[23] The MLB leader in singles is Pete Rose, who is also the league's all-time hit leader.[24] The single-season leader in singles is Ichiro Suzuki, who broke Willie Keeler's 106-year-old record in 2004 by notching 225, 19 more than the previous record.[25] None of the top five players in singles (Rose, Ty Cobb, Eddie Collins, Cap Anson, and Keeler) in MLB history have hit for the cycle;[3] of those five, only Rose had more than 150 home runs,[26] and two (Collins and Keeler), who both played during the dead-ball era, had fewer than 50,[27][28] lessening the probability of their completing the cycle.

Double

A double is a hit in which the batter reaches second base without being put out, and without the benefit of a fielding error. This scenario often occurs when a ball is hit into the gaps between the outfielders, or down the foul line on either side of the playing field.[29] Tris Speaker is the all-time leader in doubles in MLB history, with 792,[30] one of which was part of a cycle; Speaker accomplished the feat for the Boston Red Sox on June 9, 1912, against the St. Louis Browns.[3] Two of the other top five players in MLB history in doubles have hit for the cycle: Stan Musial (725 doubles; third all-time) completed the cycle on July 24, 1949; and Craig Biggio (668; fifth all-time) accomplished the feat on April 8, 2002.[3] The single-season MLB leader is Earl Webb, the left-handed outfielder who hit 67 in 1931.[31]

Triple

SamCrawford4
Sam Crawford and Ty Cobb, the top two players in MLB history in triples

The triple, in which the batter reaches third base without being put out, and without the benefit of a fielding error, is often called the "hardest part of the cycle" to complete.[32] Hitting a triple often comes under similar hit placement as a double, but may require impressive speed on the part of the runner.[33] Because of this, it is rare to see a player with slower-than-average running speed complete the cycle, but it has happened, such as when catcher Bengie Molina hit for the cycle on July 16, 2010; Molina described himself as "the [slowest] guy in baseball" earlier that season.[34] The MLB all-time leader in triples is Sam Crawford, who completed the three-base hit 309 times in his career;[35] however, none of those triples was ever part of a cycle. Of the top five players in MLB history in triples, two – Honus Wagner and Roger Connor—have hit for the cycle: Connor in 1890 and Wagner in 1912.[3] The MLB single-season record holder for triples, Chief Wilson, hit for the cycle in 1910,[3] two years before his record-setting season in which he hit 36 triples.[36]

Home run

A home run is a hit in which the batter reaches home plate, scoring a run on the same play without being put out, and without the benefit of a fielding error. Most often in modern baseball, this occurs when the batter hits the ball over the outfield wall in fair territory. Home-run hitters are often likely to be larger, slower players due to their strength, and may not be fast enough to complete the triple.[33] The MLB single-season and all-time leader in home runs is Barry Bonds, who hit 73 home runs in the 2001 season and notched 762 in his 22-season career.[37][38] Bonds never hit for the cycle.[39] Of MLB leaders in career home runs, the highest ranking player with a cycle is Alex Rodriguez (fourth all-time; retired in 2016 with 696 home runs),[40] who hit for the cycle on June 5, 1997.[3] Home runs can also occur on a batted ball that does not leave the field of play; this is called an inside-the-park home run.[33] Inside-the-park home runs are rare, and no player has hit one as part of a cycle since 1943.[41]

Accomplishments

Major League Baseball

Multiple cycles

Bob-meusel cleaned
Bob Meusel is one of only four MLB players with three career cycles.

The most career cycles hit by an MLB player is three, accomplished by four players:[41]

MLB players with three cycles in their career
Years Player Team League Ref.
1883 1883   John Reilly Cincinnati Red Stockings American Association [42][43][44]
    1890 Cincinnati Reds National League
1921 1922 1928 Bob Meusel New York Yankees American League [45][46][47]
1931 1931   Babe Herman Brooklyn Robins National League [48][49][50]
    1933 Chicago Cubs
2008     Adrián Beltré Seattle Mariners American League [51][52][53]
  2012 2015 Texas Rangers

All of Beltré's cycles occurred at Globe Life Park in Arlington; he is the only player to hit for the cycle with different teams in the same ballpark.[54]

Aaron Hill on September 16, 2013
Aaron Hill hit for the cycle twice in 2012.

Forty-four players have hit for the cycle at least twice. Five players have hit for the cycle twice in one season:[41]

MLB players with two cycles in a season
Year Player Team League Ref.
1883 John Reilly Cincinnati Reds American Association [42][43]
1887 Tip O'Neill St. Louis Brown Stockings American Association [55][56]
1931 Babe Herman Brooklyn Robins National League [48][49]
2012 Aaron Hill Arizona Diamondbacks National League [57][58]
2018 Christian Yelich Milwaukee Brewers National League [59]

One player has hit for the cycle twice against the same team in one season, Christian Yelich against the Cincinnati Reds in 2018.[60][3]

Cycles have occurred on the same day twice in MLB history; on September 17, 1920, hit by Bobby Veach of the Detroit Tigers and George Burns of the New York Giants, and again on September 1, 2008, when the Arizona Diamondbacks' Stephen Drew and the Seattle Mariners' Adrián Beltré each completed the four-hit group.[61] Conversely, the longest period of time between two players hitting for the cycle was 5 years, 1 month, and 10 days, a drought lasting from Bill Joyce's cycle in 1896 to Harry Davis' in 1901.

Bobby Veach (left) and George Burns (right) hit for the cycle on the same day, September 17, 1920.

Bobby Veach 1925 CROP
GeorgeJBurns

Natural cycles

The natural cycle, in which the hits come in order from fewest to most total bases (single, double, triple, home run), has been accomplished 14 times in MLB history:[41]

Tony Lazzeri COTA F1257 s1057 it3350 cropped
The only natural cycle by a member of the New York Yankees was hit by Tony Lazzeri in 1932.
MLB players who have hit natural cycles
Year Player Team League Ref.
1910 Bill Collins Boston Doves National League [62]
1926 Bob Fothergill Detroit Tigers American League [63]
1932 Tony Lazzeri New York Yankees American League [64]
1939 Charlie Gehringer Detroit Tigers American League [65]
1943 Leon Culberson Boston Red Sox American League [66]
1963 Jim Hickman New York Mets National League [67]
1964 Ken Boyer St. Louis Cardinals National League [68]
1966 Billy Williams Chicago Cubs National League [69]
1976 Tim Foli Montreal Expos National League [70]
1979 Bob Watson Boston Red Sox American League [71]
1996 John Mabry St. Louis Cardinals National League [72]
2000 José Valentín Chicago White Sox American League [73]
2003 Brad Wilkerson Montreal Expos National League [74]
2006 Gary Matthews Jr. Texas Rangers American League [75]

Reverse cycles

The natural cycle has been accomplished in reverse (home run, triple, double, single)—also known as an "unnatural" cycle—ten times:[2]

Luke Scott on May 11, 2012
Luke Scott's reverse cycle in 2006 was the first in nearly 40 years.
MLB players who have hit reverse cycles
Year Player Team League Ref.
1882 Curry Foley Buffalo Bisons National League [76]
1887 Bid McPhee Cincinnati Red Stockings American Association [77]
1904 Sam Mertes New York Giants National League [78]
1937 Gee Walker Detroit Tigers American League [79][80]
1939 Arky Vaughan Pittsburgh Pirates National League [81]
1948 Jackie Robinson Brooklyn Dodgers National League [82][83]
1968 Jim Fregosi California Angels American League [84][85]
2006 Luke Scott Houston Astros National League [86][87]
2008 Carlos Gómez Minnesota Twins American League [88]
2016 Rajai Davis Cleveland Indians American League [89]

Other related accomplishments

NCA 3894 Miguel Tejada
Miguel Tejada's cycle included a grand slam.

Nine players have hit a grand slam as part of their cycle:[41]

MLB players hitting a grand slam in their cycle
Year Player Team League Ref.
1882 Curry Foley Buffalo Bisons National League [90]
1901 Nap Lajoie Philadelphia Athletics American League [91]
1928 Bill Terry New York Giants National League [92]
1932 Tony Lazzeri New York Yankees American League [93]
1933 Jimmie Foxx Philadelphia Athletics American League [94]
1993 Jay Buhner Seattle Mariners American League [95]
2001 Miguel Tejada Oakland Athletics American League [96]
2009 Jason Kubel Minnesota Twins American League [97]
2010 Bengie Molina Texas Rangers American League [98]
George Brett 1990 CROP
George Brett completed his cycle with a walk-off home run.

Six players have had a walk-off home run as the final hit of their cycles:[41]

MLB players hitting a walk-off home run to complete their cycle
Year Player Team League Ref.
1961 Ken Boyer St. Louis Cardinals National League [99]
1972 César Tovar Minnesota Twins American League [100]
1979 George Brett Kansas City Royals American League [101]
1984 Dwight Evans Boston Red Sox American League [102]
2010 Carlos González Colorado Rockies National League [103]
2017 Nolan Arenado Colorado Rockies National League [104]
Ian Kinsler
Ian Kinsler went 6-for-6 on the day of his cycle.

Ten players have collected six hits in the game in which they hit their cycle. Only three of these—by Larry Twitchell, Sam Thompson, and Ian Kinsler—were accomplished in a nine-inning game in the American League or National League.[105]

MLB players with six hits in their cycle game
Year Player Team League Ref.
1883 John Reilly Cincinnati Red Stockings American Association [42]
1885 Dave Orr New York Metropolitans American Association [106]
1885 Henry Larkin Philadelphia Athletics American Association [107]
1889 Larry Twitchell Cleveland Spiders National League [108]
1890 Farmer Weaver Louisville Colonels American Association [109]
1894 Sam Thompson Philadelphia Phillies National League [110]
1920 Bobby Veachdagger Detroit Tigers American League [111]
1995 Rondell Whitedagger Montreal Expos National League [112]
2009 Ian Kinsler Texas Rangers American League [113]
2018 Christian Yelichdagger Milwaukee Brewers National League [114]

dagger indicates an extra-innings game (Yelich collected his six hits in the first nine innings of a 10-inning game.)

Kinsler's six-hit cycle came on Jackie Robinson Day, honoring the African-American pioneer who had hit for the cycle in 1948.[115]

Nap Lajoie 1913
In 1901, Nap Lajoie hit for the cycle and won the AL Triple Crown.

The most recent player to hit for the cycle with an inside-the-park home run was Leon Culberson in 1943.[41][66]

The earliest in a game that a cycle has been completed is the fourth inning, accomplished by Mike Lansing of the Colorado Rockies on June 18, 2000, when he had a first-inning triple, second-inning homer, third-inning double, and fourth-inning single.[54]

Four batters hit for the cycle in the same season in which they won the Triple Crown; Nap Lajoie (AL, 1901), Jimmie Foxx (AL, 1933), Chuck Klein (NL, 1933), and Lou Gehrig (AL, 1934).[3][116] Gehrig is the only player to complete the MLB Triple Crown in his cycle-hitting season, leading both leagues in batting average, home runs, and runs batted in.

Five players have hit for the cycle in the same season in which they won a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award; Jimmie Foxx in 1933, Ted Williams in 1946, Mickey Mantle in 1957, and both Mookie Betts and Christian Yelich in 2018.

Three players — John Olerud, Michael Cuddyer, and Bob Watson — have hit for the cycle in both the National League and American League.[54]

Two family pairs have hit for the cycle; father and son Gary Ward (1980) and Daryle Ward (2004), and grandfather and grandson Gus Bell (1951) and David Bell (2004).[3]

Two players have hit cycles both for and against the same team; Joe Cronin against the Red Sox (1929) and for the Red Sox (1940), and Adrián Beltré against the Rangers (2008) and for the Rangers (2012, 2015).

One player, Brock Holt of the Boston Red Sox, hit for the cycle in a postseason game: Game 3 of the 2018 ALDS, on October 8, 2018, against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium.

Nippon Professional Baseball

Multiple cycles

SH-Arihito-Muramatsu
Arihito Muramatsu is one of five players to hit a natural cycle in NPB.

During his eight seasons playing for the Yokohama BayStars, Bobby Rose hit for three cycles, the most of any Nippon Professional Baseball player. Spaced two seasons apart, his first cycle occurred on May 2, 1995, the next on April 29, 1997, and his final cycle on June 30, 1999. Three NPB players have hit for the cycle twice; Fumio Fujimura (both with the Osaka Tigers), Hiromi Matsunaga (both with the Hankyu/Orix Braves), and Kosuke Fukudome (one with the Chunichi Dragons, and one with the Hanshin Tigers). Fujimura is also the only player to have hit a cycle during both the single league era and the current dual league era.[11]

The 2003 NPB season saw the most cycles hit in a single season—five.[11] That season also saw the only instance of cycles occurring on the same day: on July 1, hit by Atsunori Inaba of the Yakult Swallows and Arihito Muramatsu of the Fukuoka Daiei Hawks.[117] The next day, Shinjiro Hiyama became the third player to hit for the cycle in two days.[118] Conversely, the longest period of time between two players hitting for the cycle was 5 years, 11 months, and 30 days, a drought lasting from Michihiro Ogasawara's cycle in 2008 to Rainel Rosario's in 2014.[11]

Natural cycles

The natural cycle has been accomplished five times in NPB history. Fumio Fujimura's second cycle on May 25, 1950, was the first time a player collected the hits in order. On average, the natural cycle occurs approximately every 13 years. Other than Fujimura, the four players to hit for the natural cycle are Kazuhiko Kondo in 1961, Takahiro Tokutsu in 1976, Takanori Okamura in 1985, and Muramatsu in 2003. The natural cycle has been accomplished in reverse by Alex Ochoa (2004) and Rosario (2014).[11]

Other related accomplishments

When Ochoa hit his cycle with the Chunichi Dragons on April 13, 2004, he became the only player to hit a cycle in both Major League Baseball and Nippon Professional Baseball. Eight years earlier, Ochoa had accomplished the same feat on July 3, 1996, while playing for MLB's New York Mets.[119] Yakult Swallows catcher Atsuya Furuta is the only player to hit for the cycle in an NPB All-Star game, doing so in game 2 of the 1992 series.[120] Inaba is the only player to hit for the cycle in a rain-shortened game. After hitting a triple in the first inning and hitting a home run in the fourth, Inaba collected the other two necessary hits in a seven-run fifth inning when the order batted around.[117] Kosuke Fukudome is the only player to have hit a grand slam as the home run of the cycle.[121] Hiroshi Ohshita and Kazuhiko Kondo are the only two players to have hit a walk-off home run to win the game as the final hit of their cycles.

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External links

Alex Ochoa

Alex Ochoa (; born March 29, 1972) is a Cuban-American former professional baseball outfielder in Major League Baseball and Nippon Professional Baseball.

Charlie Moore (baseball)

Charles William Moore Jr. (born June 21, 1953) is a former professional baseball player who played in Major League Baseball (MLB), primarily as a catcher and outfielder, from 1973 through 1987. He played 14 seasons with the Milwaukee Brewers, and one season with the Toronto Blue Jays.

Christian Yelich

Christian Stephen Yelich (born December 5, 1991) is an American professional baseball outfielder for the Milwaukee Brewers Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Miami Marlins. Yelich was drafted by the Marlins in the 1st round (23rd overall) of the 2010 Major League Baseball draft. He bats left-handed and throws right-handed. He is one of four players in Brewers history to win the Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award.

Daytona Tortugas

The Daytona Tortugas are a minor league baseball team based in Daytona Beach, Florida. The team plays in the Florida State League (FSL). They are the Class A-Advanced affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball. The team plays at Radiology Associates Field at Jackie Robinson Ballpark; opened in 1914, the park seats 5,100 fans. In 2015, the inaugural season of Tortugas baseball, Daytona finished with a 77-58 record and won the Florida State League North Division Championship with a two-game sweep of the Clearwater Threshers in the first round of the playoffs.

The club was previously known as the Daytona Cubs from 1993 to 2014 when the team was an affiliate of the Chicago Cubs. The team has won six Florida State League championships: in 1995, 2000, 2004 (co-champions with the Tampa Yankees), 2008, 2011 and 2013. Their sixth FSL Championship came over the Charlotte Stone Crabs, winning 3–1 in a best-of-five series.

Gary Ward (outfielder)

Gary Lamell Ward (born December 6, 1953) is a former American professional baseball outfielder who played in Major League Baseball from 1979 to 1990 for the Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers, New York Yankees, and Detroit Tigers. He is the father of former major league player Daryle Ward.

Jack Brohamer

John Anthony Brohamer (born February 26, 1950) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) player. A second baseman (though he also played some third base), he played with the Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox, and Boston Red Sox from 1972 to 1980.

Jim Ray Hart

James Ray Hart (October 30, 1941 – May 19, 2016) was a third baseman in Major League Baseball. He played for the National League's San Francisco Giants from 1963 to 1973 and the American League's New York Yankees in 1973 and 1974. Hart batted and threw right-handed. In a 12-season career, Hart posted a .278 batting average, with 170 home runs and 578 runs batted in (RBIs) in 1,125 Major League games played.

John Reilly (baseball)

John Good Reilly [Long John] (October 5, 1858 – May 31, 1937) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who hit 69 home runs and batted .289 during his ten-year career. In 1888, he hit 13 home runs with 103 RBI and a .321 batting average.

List of Detroit Tigers team records

This is a list of Detroit Tigers single-season, career, and other team records.

List of Major League Baseball players to hit for the cycle

In baseball, completing the cycle is the accomplishment of hitting a single, a double, a triple, and a home run in the same game. Collecting the hits in that order is known as a "natural cycle", which has occurred 14 times in Major League Baseball (MLB). The cycle itself is semi-rare in MLB, occurring a total of 327 times, starting with Curry Foley in 1882. In terms of frequency, the cycle is roughly as common as a no-hitter; Baseball Digest calls it "one of the rarest feats in baseball". Only one current team in MLB has never had a player hit for the cycle: the Miami Marlins.The most cycles hit by a single player in MLB is three, accomplished by four players; John Reilly was the first to hit a third when he completed the cycle on August 6, 1890, after hitting his first two in a week (September 12 and 19, 1883) for the Cincinnati Reds. Bob Meusel became the second man to complete three cycles, playing for the New York Yankees; his first occurred on May 7, 1921, the next on July 3, 1922, and his final cycle on July 26, 1928. Babe Herman accomplished the feat for two different teams—the Brooklyn Robins (May 18 and July 24, 1931) and the Chicago Cubs (September 30, 1933). Adrián Beltré is the most recent addition to this list, cycling first for the Seattle Mariners (September 1, 2008) before cycling twice as a member of the Texas Rangers (August 24, 2012 and August 3, 2015). Beltré is the only player to have completed all three cycles in the same ballpark, with the first occurring as an opponent of the Texas Rangers at Globe Life Park in Arlington.

The most cycles hit in a single major league season is eight, which has occurred twice: first in the 1933 season, and then again in the 2009 season; all eight cycles in each of those seasons were hit by different players. Cycles have occurred on the same day twice in MLB history: on September 17, 1920, hit by Bobby Veach of the Detroit Tigers and George Burns of the New York Giants; and again on September 1, 2008, when the Arizona Diamondbacks' Stephen Drew and the Seattle Mariners' Adrián Beltré each completed the four-hit group. Conversely, the longest period of time between two players hitting for the cycle was five years, one month, and ten days, a drought lasting from Bill Joyce's cycle in 1896 to Harry Davis' in 1901. Three players—John Olerud, Bob Watson and Michael Cuddyer—have hit for the cycle in both the National and American Leagues. Family pairs to hit for the cycle include father and son Gary and Daryle Ward, who accomplished the feat in 1980 and 2004, respectively; and grandfather and grandson Gus and David Bell, the elder of whom hit for the cycle in 1951, and the younger in 2004.Dave Winfield and Mel Ott are the oldest and youngest players to hit for the cycle, at ages 39 and 20, respectively. Of multiple-cycle hitters, John Reilly holds the record for the shortest time between cycles (seven days), while Aaron Hill holds the record since the formation of the American League, with his two 2012 feats coming within an 11-day span. Conversely, George Brett's two cycles came 11 years and 58 days apart. Christian Yelich is the only player to hit for the cycle twice in one season against the same team, doing so 20 days apart against the Cincinnati Reds in 2018. On October 8, 2018, Brock Holt of the Boston Red Sox hit for the cycle against the New York Yankees in Game 3 of the American League Division Series; it was the first cycle in MLB postseason history.

List of Nippon Professional Baseball players to hit for the cycle

In baseball, completing the cycle is the accomplishment of hitting a single, a double, a triple, and a home run in the same game. Collecting the hits in that order is known as a "natural cycle", which has occurred five times in Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB). The cycle itself is rare in NPB, occurring 74 times since Fumio Fujimura's first cycle during the single league era in 1948. In terms of frequency, the cycle is roughly as common as a no-hitter (90 occurrences in NPB history); Baseball Digest calls it "one of the rarest feats in baseball". Hitting for the cycle was not recognized in Japanese professional baseball until former Major League Baseball (MLB) player Daryl Spencer made a remark about it after hitting for the cycle with the Hankyu Braves in 1965. Of the 12 current NPB teams, only the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles have never had at least one player hit for the cycle.The most cycles hit by a player in Nippon Professional Baseball is three, accomplished by Bobby Rose. Playing for the Yokohama BayStars, Rose hit his first cycle on May 2, 1995, the next on April 29, 1997, and his final cycle on June 30, 1999. Other than Rose, only three other NPB players have hit multiple cycles: Fumio Fujimura with the Osaka Tigers and Hiromi Matsunaga with the Hankyu/Orix Braves and Kosuke Fukudome with the Chunichi Dragons and the Hanshin Tigers, all with two. Fujimura is also the only player to have hit a cycle during both the single league era and the current dual league era. The 2003 NPB season saw the most cycles hit in a single season—five. That season also saw the only instance of cycles occurring in two different games on the same day: on July 1, hit by Atsunori Inaba of the Yakult Swallows and Arihito Muramatsu of the Fukuoka Daiei Hawks. The next day, Shinjiro Hiyama became the third player to hit for the cycle in two days. Conversely, the longest period of time between two players hitting for the cycle is one day shy of 6 years. The drought has lasted from Michihiro Ogasawara's cycle in 2008 until Rainel Rosario's in 2014.No player has ever hit a cycle in both the Central and Pacific Leagues; however, after Alex Ochoa hit his cycle with the Chunichi Dragons on April 13, 2004, he became the only player to hit a cycle in both MLB and NPB. Ochoa hit his first and only cycle in the MLB eight years prior on July 3, 1996, while playing for the New York Mets. Yakult Swallows catcher Atsuya Furuta is the only player to hit for the cycle in an NPB All-Star game, hitting one in game 2 of the 1992 series. Furuta's cycle is not considered an official NPB cycle as it occurred during an exhibition game. Inaba is the only player to hit for the cycle in a rain-shortened game. After hitting a triple in the first inning and hitting a home run in the fourth, Inaba collected the other two necessary hits in a seven-run fifth inning when the order batted around. Six players achieved their cycles by acquiring a required hit during extra innings. Kosuke Fukudome is the only player to have hit a grand slam as the home run of the cycle. Hiroshi Ohshita and Kazuhiko Kondo are the only two players to have hit a walk-off home run to win the game as the final hit of their cycles.

List of Texas Rangers team records

The Texas Rangers Major League Baseball team has played in Arlington, Texas, since 1972. The team began in 1961 as the Washington Senators, an American League expansion team based in Washington, D.C., before relocating to Texas. This list documents players and teams who hold records set in various statistical areas during single games, entire seasons, or their Rangers' careers.

Mike Lansing

Michael Thomas Lansing (born April 3, 1968) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman who played for the Montreal Expos, Colorado Rockies, and the Boston Red Sox between 1993 and 2001. During his playing days, he had the nickname “The Laser.”

Mike Tiernan

Michael Joseph Tiernan (January 21, 1867 – November 7, 1918), nicknamed "Silent Mike", was an American professional baseball right fielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) exclusively for the New York Giants from 1887 to 1899. Born in Trenton, New Jersey, his debut game was on April 30, 1887. His final game was played on July 31, 1899. Tiernan led the National League in home runs in 1890 and 1891, and compiled a .311 lifetime batting average. He is the Giants' all-time franchise leader in triples and stolen bases. One of the great home run hitters of the 19th century, he hit 106 of them, which ties him with Hall of Famer Dan Brouthers for fourth most among 19th century ball players.

Ray Lankford

Raymond Lewis Lankford (born June 5, 1967) is a former center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the St. Louis Cardinals and San Diego Padres from 1990 to 2004. He was known for his combination of power, speed, and defensive prowess.

Scott Cooper (baseball)

Scott Kendrick Cooper (born October 13, 1967) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman who played for the Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Cardinals, and Kansas City Royals during the 1990s.

Ski Melillo

Oscar Donald "Ski" Melillo (August 4, 1899 – November 14, 1963) was an American second baseman and coach in Major League Baseball. He briefly served as manager of the St. Louis Browns in 1938 and was also a member of the coaching staff for the Cleveland Indians' 1948 World Series championship team.

Tim Foli

Timothy John Foli (born December 8, 1950), is an American former professional baseball player, coach and minor league manager. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a shortstop for the New York Mets, Montreal Expos, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates, California Angels and New York Yankees from 1970 to 1985. At age 17, Foli was the first pick in the Major League Baseball Draft in 1968 and went on to be a member of the 1979 World Series champion Pirates. Foli was known as a fiery player who was a reliable fielder but only an average hitter. Foli was a free swinger, especially in 1982 when he walked only 14 times, the lowest total ever for 150 or more games played (Ozzie Guillén broke Foli's notorious record three years later). His free swinging did not aim for the fences, however, as he averaged less than two home runs per season.

His lack of power, combined with a lack of running speed (averaging approximately a stolen base every 20 games) resulted in Foli typically batting either second in the lineup or near the bottom. Although he accumulated few walks, Foli was also one of the most difficult to strike out, posting the league's best strikeout percentage three times and finishing in the top ten five times. Foli compiled a .333 batting average in the 1979 postseason, contributing to Pittsburgh's last World Championship. He was an accomplished bunter, finishing in the league top ten in sacrifice hits eight times including an American League-leading 26 in 1982.

Defensively, Foli led league shortstops in fielding percentage in 1980 and 1982. He led the National League in double plays twice, in total chances twice, and in putouts once. Foli's defensive low occurred on September 9, 1972, when he committed three errors in one inning, leading to three runs in Montreal's 8–3 loss.

Tony Lazzeri

Anthony Michael Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 – August 6, 1946) was an Italian-American professional baseball second baseman during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball. He was part of the famed "Murderers' Row" Yankee batting lineup of the late 1920s (most notably the legendary 1927 team), along with Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Bob Meusel.

Lazzeri was born and raised in San Francisco, California. He dropped out of school to work with his father as a boilermaker, but at the age of 18, began to play baseball professionally. After playing in minor league baseball from 1922 through 1925, Lazzeri joined the Yankees in 1926. He was a member of the original American League All-Star team in 1933. He was nicknamed "Poosh 'Em Up" by Italian-speaking fans, from a mistranslation of an Italian phrase meaning to "hit it out" (hit a home run).

Lazzeri is one of only 14 major league baseball players to hit for the natural cycle (hitting a single, double, triple and home run in sequence) and the only player to complete a natural cycle with a grand slam. He also holds the American League record for the most RBI in a single game, with 11 on May 24, 1936. In that same 1936 game, he became the first major league player to hit two grand slams in one game. Lazzeri was posthumously inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1991.

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