History of rugby union matches between England and South Africa

The national rugby union teams of England and South Africa (the Springboks) have been playing each other in Test rugby since 1906, and, by November 2019, had met in 43 Test matches. South Africa lead the series by 26 wins to 15, with 2 matches drawn. Their first meeting was on 8 December 1906, as part of the green team first tour of Europe, with the match ending in a 3–3 draw. South Africa won their most recent meeting between the teams, on 2nd November 2019, the World Cup final, with 32-12.

Summary

Overall

Details Played Won by
 England
Won by
 South Africa
Drawn England points South Africa points
In England 22 10 11 1 376 349
In South Africa 16 4 11 1 289 437
Neutral venue 5 1 4 0 64 133
Overall 43 15 26 2 729 919

Records

Note: Date shown in brackets indicates when the record was last set.

Record England South Africa
Longest winning streak 7 (24 Jun 2000 – 18 Nov 2006) 9 (25 Nov 2006 – 16 Jun 2012)
Largest points for
Home 53 (23 November 2002) 58 (26 May 2007)
Away 39 (9 June 2018) 44 (24 October 1999)
Largest winning margin
Home 50 (23 November 2002) 48 (26 May 2007)
Away 19 (18 October 2003) 36 (14 September 2007, 22 November 2008)
Largest aggregate score
81 (South Africa 42 - 39 England) (9 June 2018)

Results

No. Date Venue Score Winner Competition
1 8 December 1906 Crystal Palace, London 3 – 3   draw 1906-07 South Africa rugby union tour
2 4 January 1913 Twickenham, London 3 – 9  South Africa 1912-13 South Africa rugby union tour
3 2 January 1932 Twickenham, London 0 – 7  South Africa 1931-32 South Africa rugby union tour
4 5 January 1952 Twickenham, London 3 – 8  South Africa 1951-52 South Africa rugby union tour
5 7 January 1961 Twickenham, London 0 – 5  South Africa 1960-61 South Africa rugby union tour of Europe
6 20 December 1969 Twickenham, London 11 – 8  England 1969-70 South Africa rugby union tour
7 3 June 1972 Ellis Park, Johannesburg 9 – 18  England 1972 England rugby union tour of South Africa
8 2 June 1984 Boet Erasmus Stadium, Port Elizabeth 33 – 15  South Africa 1984 England rugby union tour of South Africa
9 9 June 1984 Ellis Park, Johannesburg 35 – 9  South Africa
10 14 November 1992 Twickenham, London 33 – 16  England
11 4 June 1994 Loftus Versfeld, Pretoria 15 – 32  England 1994 England rugby union tour of South Africa
12 11 June 1994 Newlands, Cape Town 27 – 9  South Africa
13 18 November 1995 Twickenham, London 14 – 24  South Africa
14 29 November 1997 Twickenham, London 11 – 29  South Africa 1997 South Africa rugby union tour of Europe
15 4 July 1998 Newlands, Cape Town 18 – 0  South Africa 1998 England rugby union tour of Australasia and South Africa
16 5 December 1998 Twickenham, London 13 – 7  England 1998 South Africa rugby union tour of Britain and Ireland
17 24 October 1999 Stade de France, Paris 21 – 44  South Africa 1999 Rugby World Cup Quarter-final
18 17 June 2000 Loftus Versfeld, Pretoria 18 – 13  South Africa 2000 England rugby union tour of South Africa
19 24 June 2000 Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein 22 – 27  England
20 2 December 2000 Twickenham, London 25 – 17  England 2000 Autumn International
21 24 November 2001 Twickenham, London 29 – 9  England 2001 Autumn International
22 23 November 2002 Twickenham, London 53 – 3  England 2002 Autumn International
23 18 October 2003 Subiaco Oval, Perth 25 – 6  England 2003 Rugby World Cup Pool Stage
24 20 November 2004 Twickenham, London 32 – 16  England 2004 Autumn International
25 18 November 2006 Twickenham, London 23 – 21  England 2006 South Africa rugby union tour of Ireland and England
26 25 November 2006 Twickenham, London 14 – 25  South Africa
27 26 May 2007 Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein 58 – 10  South Africa 2007 England rugby union tour of South Africa
28 2 June 2007 Loftus Versfeld, Pretoria 55 – 22  South Africa
29 14 September 2007 Stade de France, Paris 0 – 36  South Africa 2007 Rugby World Cup Pool Stage
30 20 October 2007 Stade de France, Paris 6 – 15  South Africa 2007 Rugby World Cup Final
31 22 November 2008 Twickenham, London 6 – 42  South Africa 2008 Autumn International
32 27 November 2010 Twickenham, London 11 – 21  South Africa 2010 Autumn International
33 9 June 2012 Kings Park, Durban 22 – 17  South Africa 2012 England rugby union tour of South Africa
34 16 June 2012 Ellis Park, Johannesburg 36 – 27  South Africa
35 23 June 2012 Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth 14 – 14   draw
36 24 November 2012 Twickenham, London 15 – 16  South Africa 2012 Autumn International
37 15 November 2014 Twickenham, London 28 – 31  South Africa 2014 Autumn International
38 12 November 2016 Twickenham, London 37 – 21  England 2016 Autumn International
39 9 June 2018 Ellis Park, Johannesburg 42 – 39  South Africa 2018 England rugby union tour of South Africa
40 16 June 2018 Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein 23 – 12  South Africa
41 23 June 2018 Newlands, Cape Town 10 – 25  England
42 3 November 2018 Twickenham, London 12 – 11  England 2018 Autumn International
43 2 November 2019 International Stadium Yokohama, Yokohama 12 – 32  South Africa 2019 Rugby World Cup Final

List of series

Played Won by
 England
Won by
 South Africa
Drawn
7 0 3 4
Year England South Africa Series winner
South Africa 1984 0 2  South Africa
South Africa 1994 1 1   draw
South Africa 2000 1 1   draw
England 2006 1 1   draw
South Africa 2007 0 2  South Africa
South Africa 2012 ½  South Africa
South Africa 2018 1 2  South Africa

External links

  • "Pick and Go Test match results database". lassen.co.nz. Retrieved 2008-11-24.
1972 England rugby union tour of South Africa

This first tour undertaken by England to South Africa was organised with a demanding schedule, although with only one Test Match. Within two weeks and three days, seven matches were to be played, the first four at sea level, and the final three, including the Test Match, at the altitude in the highveld with only two days to acclimatise before a demanding fixture against Northern Transvaal. From the outset, under captain John Pullin and the management of Alec Lewis and John Elders, there was a buoyant and optimistic spirit in the squad, as if they were determined to erase the memories of the last few seasons of undistinguished English performances.

1984 England rugby union tour of South Africa

The 1984 England rugby union tour of South Africa was a series of seven matches played by the England national rugby union team in South Africa in May and June 1984. England played seven games, including two test matches against the South Africa national rugby union team. They won four of the seven matches but lost both of the test matches as well as drawing the fixture against Western Province.

In the face of much criticism, and in spite of covert political pressure, the Rugby Football Union decided that the tour of South Africa should go ahead, but probably with hindsight, in the light of results, later wished that they had not. Although only Ralph Knibbs of Bristol made opposition to apartheid his reason, many other top players were also unable to tour, and the squad was relatively inexperienced. 10 of the 26 players were uncapped before the tour and 7 gained their first caps in South Africa.

2007 Rugby World Cup Final

The 2007 Rugby World Cup Final was a rugby union match, played on Saturday, 20 October 2007 at the Stade de France, Saint-Denis, Paris, to determine the winner of the 2007 Rugby World Cup. South Africa beat England 15–6. Having also won the 1995 tournament, South Africa became the second country to win two World Cups, following Australia, who won in 1991 and 1999.

England and South Africa, who won their semi-finals against France and Argentina respectively, had met during the pool stage of the competition, when South Africa won 36–0. South Africa began the final undefeated in the competition. The final was refereed by Irish referee Alain Rolland.

The match itself was try-less with each team scoring only penalties, South Africa five – four by fullback Percy Montgomery and one by centre François Steyn – and England two, both by fly-half Jonny Wilkinson. Each team had one major try scoring opportunity; South Africa's came late in the first half, while England's came early in the second, as wing Mark Cueto had a try disallowed in the 42nd minute after he was ruled to have put a foot in touch during a tackle by Danie Rossouw before grounding the ball. Television match official Stuart Dickinson stood by his decision, though he encountered a language barrier with the French broadcaster preventing his access to frame-by-frame pictures.

2018 England rugby union tour of South Africa

In June 2018, England played a three-test series against South Africa as part of the 2018 mid-year rugby union tests. The series was part of the sixth year of the global rugby calendar established by World Rugby, which runs through to 2019.

2019 Rugby World Cup Final

The 2019 Rugby World Cup Final was a rugby union match played on 2 November 2019 at the International Stadium Yokohama in Yokohama, Japan. It marked the culmination of the 2019 Rugby World Cup and was played between England and South Africa, a rematch of the 2007 Rugby World Cup Final.

The match saw South Africa claim their third Rugby World Cup title with a 32–12 victory, with tries from Makazole Mapimpi and Cheslin Kolbe adding to six penalties and two conversions from Handré Pollard. The official player of the match was South Africa's number eight, Duane Vermeulen.The match was the United Kingdom's most watched TV broadcast in 2019 with a peak audience of 12.8 million watching on ITV.

Outline of South Africa

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to South Africa:

South Africa – A sovereign country located at the southern tip of Africa. South Africa's coast stretches 2,798 kilometres and borders both the Atlantic and Indian oceans. To the north of South Africa lie Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Eswatini (formerly Swaziland), while the Kingdom of Lesotho is an independent enclave surrounded by South African territory.

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