Himroo

Himroo is a fabric made of silk and cotton, which is grown locally in Aurangabad. Himroo was brought to Aurangabad in the reign of Mohammad Tughlaq, when he had shifted his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad, Aurangabad. The word himroo originated from Persian word Hum-ruh which means 'similar'. Himroo is a replication of Kinkhwab, which was woven with pure golden and silver threads in olden days, and was meant for the royal families.

Himroo uses Persian designs, and is very characteristic and distinctive in appearance. Himroo from Aurangabad is in demand for its unique style and design. Some historians believe that Himroo was the innovation of local craftsmen with very little Persian influence. Himroo Is woven near Delhi Gate and Zaffar Gate neighborhood in Aurangabad.[1]

Himrooshawl
Himroo Shawl

History

According to historians this art originated in Persia, though it has not been proved, himroo is associated with the times of Mohammad Tughlaq who ruled in the 14th century. When Mohammad Tughlaq shifted his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad many weavers came and settled here. During the migration, the weavers instead of returning to Delhi chose to stay back here. They did not want to go back to Delhi. During the reign of Malik Ambar many people were attracted to the city and came and settled here from far and wide. Aurangabad during Aurangzeb's Governorship and the times of Mughal became the capital and the weavers had a gala time making money and becoming prosperous. The handicraft industry in Aurangabad attracted hundreds of craftsman and artisans. Members of the royal family and an elite few used the famous Aurangabad himroo. Himroo weaving is very characteristic and different. Fabrics and shawls from Aurangabad are much in demand for their unique style and design.[2]

References

  1. ^ "The Story of Himroo". Himroo.com. Himroo. Retrieved 13 April 2014.
  2. ^ Qureshi, Dulari (1999). Tourism Potential in Aurangabad. Delhi: Bhartiya Kala Prakashan. p. 65. ISBN 81-86050-44-2.
Airdura

Airdura is a synthetic fabric used for motorcycle clothing with summer or warmer riding conditions. The cloth is light and claimed to be "breathable". It is likely to be a play on the name of DuPont's (Invista's) cordura.

Aurangabad, Maharashtra

Aurangabad (pronunciation ) is a city in the Aurangabad district of Maharashtra state in India. Aurangabad is also the administrative capital of the centrally situated Marathwada region. The city is an important industrial hub, as well as a tourism hub, and is surrounded by several historical monuments and the UNESCO World Heritage Sites such as the Ajanta and Ellora caves.

Beetling

For the study and collection of beetles, see coleopterology.

Beetling is the pounding of linen or cotton fabric to give a flat, lustrous effect.

Cloqué

A Cloque or cloqué (French for "blister" or "blistered"), occasionally abbreviated clox, is a cloth with a raised woven pattern and a puckered or quilted look. The surface is made up of small irregularly raised figures formed by the woven structure. The Americanized spelling is "cloky".

Darlexx

Darlexx, a product of the Shawmut Corporation, is a warp knit fabric laminated to a monolithic film. It is a sports performance fabric used in gloves, boots, wet suits, ski apparel, clean rooms, and in medical applications. It was designed to keep a person "warm when the environment is cold and cool when the environment is hot" and is breathable, windproof, and waterproof.It is also useful in applications in specialty orthopedic garments and clothing along with coverings for different seating and positioning systems on wheelchairs.

Georgette (fabric)

Georgette (from crêpe Georgette) is a sheer, lightweight, dull-finished crêpe fabric named after the early 20th century French dressmaker Georgette de la Plante.Originally made from silk, Georgette is made with highly twisted yarns. Its characteristic crinkly surface is created by alternating S- and Z-twist yarns in both warp and weft.Georgette is made in solid colors and prints and is used for blouses, dresses, evening gowns, saris, and trimmings. It is springier and less lustrous than the closely related chiffon.

Lampas

Lampas is a type of luxury fabric with a background weft (a "ground weave") typically in taffeta with supplementary wefts (the "pattern wefts") laid on top and forming a design, sometimes also with a "brocading weft". Lampas is typically woven in silk, and often has gold and silver thread enrichment.

List of fabrics

Fabrics in this list include fabrics that are woven, braided or knitted from textile fibres.

Nainsook

Nainsook is a soft, fine, lightweight form of muslin. Muslin encompasses a broad range of fabrics of varying weights and fineness, but is always a plain weave, cotton fabric.

The word nainsook is first documented in 1790, and derives from the Hindi and Urdu "nainsukh", which literally means "eye's delight".Nainsook was often used to make babies' clothing or lingerie at least until the 1920s. Nainsook cotton was also often used to make bias tape in the 50s and 60s.

Organdy

Organdy or organdie is the sheerest and crispest cotton cloth made. Combed yarns contribute to its appearance.

Organza

Organza is a thin, plain weave, sheer fabric traditionally made from silk. Many modern organzas are woven with synthetic filament fibers such as polyester or nylon. Silk organza is woven by a number of mills along the Yangtze River and in the province of Zhejiang in China. A coarser silk organza is woven in the Bangalore area of India. Deluxe silk organzas are woven in France and Italy.Organza is used for bridalwear and eveningwear. In the interiors market it is used for effects in bedrooms and between rooms. Double-width organzas in viscose and acetate are used as sheer curtains.

Ottoman (textile)

Ottoman is a fabric with a pronounced ribbed or corded effect, often made of silk or a mixture of cotton and other silk like yarns. It is mostly used for formal dress and in particular, legal dress (such as QC gowns) and academic dress (mostly for hoods).

Ottoman made of pure silk is very expensive so artificial silk is used instead to create a cheaper alternative.

Grosgrain is similar to Ottoman but it is thinner and lighter than Ottoman and is used mostly for ribbons.

Pile (textile)

Pile is the raised surface or nap of a fabric, consisting of upright loops or strands of yarn. Examples of pile textiles are carpets, corduroy, velvet, plush, and Turkish towels. The word is derived from Latin pilus for "hair"

Pongee

Pongee is a soft thin woven cloth. In the early 20th century, pongee was an important export from China to the United States. Pongee is still woven in silk by many mills across China, especially along the banks of the Yangtze at mills in Sichuan, Anhui, Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces. Generally it varies in weight from 36 to about 50gm/sq m. In lighter variants, it is called Paj. It is used as a blouse weight or lining silk.

Rōketsuzome

Rōketsuzome or short rōzome is a traditional wax-resist textile dyeing technique in Japan, akin to Indonesian batik.

Tucuyo

Tucuyo is a type of coarse cotton cloth made in Latin America.

Vitale Barberis Canonico

Vitale Barberis Canonico is an Italian fabric mill established in 1663, located about 50 miles north of

Turin in the northern Biella region. Francesco Vitale Barberis is the current creative director.The company's largest customer is the Italian fabric mill and luxury menswear fashion house Ermenegildo Zegna. Vitale Barberis Canonico has remained a family-owned business for 15 generations.

Waffle fabric

Waffle fabric, or sometimes honeycomb fabric, is usually made of cotton or microfibre and is woven in a way which makes it very absorbent. The waffle weave also allows air to flow through the fabric so that it dries quickly. Waffle fabrics are made in a range of weights.

Waffle fabric is used for cleaning surfaces in industry. The surface of the fabric is textured rather like a culinary waffle, hence the name. This texture gives more surface area for absorption and cleaning than a normal flat surface. It is woven on a loom.

Woven fabric

Woven fabric is any textile formed by weaving. Woven fabrics are often created on a loom, and made of many threads woven on a warp and a weft. Technically, a woven fabric is any fabric made by interlacing two or more threads at right angles to one another.

Woven
Figured woven
Pile woven
Nonwoven
Knitted
Netted
Technical
Patterns
Textile fibers
Fabric mills
Related
Rivers
Dams, barrages
Geographical
features / regions
Riparian districts
Cities
Languages / people
Coalfields
Oil / gas fields
Industries
Transport
Pollution concerns,
River basin's sustainable
productivity & ecology
Related topics
Other basins

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.