Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

Hillsborough County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2010 census, the population was 400,721.[1] The population was estimated at 415,247 in 2018.[2] Its county seats are Manchester and Nashua. Hillsborough is northern New England's most populous county as well as its most densely populated. Hillsborough County comprises the Manchester-Nashua, NH Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn constitutes a portion of the Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire
Courthouse Nashua 5
Hillsborough County Courthouse in Nashua
Seal of Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

Seal
Map of New Hampshire highlighting Hillsborough County

Location within the U.S. state of New Hampshire
Map of the United States highlighting New Hampshire

New Hampshire's location within the U.S.
Founded1769
Named forThe Earl of Hillsborough
SeatManchester and Nashua
Largest cityManchester (by population)
Weare (by area)
Area
 • Total892 sq mi (2,310 km2)
 • Land876 sq mi (2,269 km2)
 • Water16 sq mi (41 km2), 1.8%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)415,247
 • Density474/sq mi (183/km2)
Congressional districts1st, 2nd
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.hillsboroughcountynh.org

History

Hillsborough was one of the five original counties identified for New Hampshire in 1769, and was named for Wills Hill, the Earl of Hillsborough who was British Secretary of State for the Colonies at the time. The county was organized at Amherst on March 19, 1771. In 1823 a number of towns were removed to become part of Merrimack County. Over several years ending in 1869, county administrative functions were moved from Amherst first to Milford in 1866 then to the current seats of Manchester and Nashua.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 892 square miles (2,310 km2), of which 876 square miles (2,270 km2) is land and 16 square miles (41 km2) (1.8%) is water.[3] The highest point in Hillsborough county is Pack Monadnock Mountain at 2,290 feet (700 m).

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179032,883
180043,89933.5%
181049,24912.2%
182053,8849.4%
183037,724−30.0%
184042,49412.6%
185057,47835.3%
186062,1408.1%
187064,2383.4%
188075,63417.7%
189093,24723.3%
1900112,64020.8%
1910126,07211.9%
1920135,5127.5%
1930140,1653.4%
1940144,8883.4%
1950156,9878.4%
1960178,16113.5%
1970223,94125.7%
1980276,60823.5%
1990336,07321.5%
2000380,84113.3%
2010400,7215.2%
Est. 2018415,247[2]3.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
1790-1960[5] 1900-1990[6]
1990-2000[7] 2010-2018[1]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 400,721 people, 155,466 households, and 103,959 families residing in the county.[8] The population density was 457.4 inhabitants per square mile (176.6/km2). There were 166,053 housing units at an average density of 189.5 per square mile (73.2/km2).[9] The racial makeup of the county was 90.4% white, 3.2% Asian, 2.1% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 2.1% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 5.3% of the population.[8]

Of the 155,466 households, 33.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.6% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.1% were non-families, and 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.05. The median age was 39.3 years.[8]

For the period 2011–2015, 24.8% of the county's population had French ancestry (including 9.9% of the total population with French Canadian ancestry), 20.9% had Irish, 13.1% had English, 10.2% had Italian, and 8.2% had German ancestry.[10] For the same time period, the estimated median annual income for a household in the county was $71,244, and the median income for a family was $85,966. Male full-time workers had a median income of $60,349 versus $44,270 for females. The per capita income for the county was $35,242. About 5.8% of families and 8.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.7% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.[11]

Politics and government

Long the most populated county in New Hampshire, Hillsborough County has played a vital role in shaping the state's politics as a whole, although it has shifted in its own leanings over the years. Historically a Republican county going back to the 19th century, the county's more urban population made it receptive to Democrats in the early 20th century at a time when much of New England was solidly Republican. The county- and the state as a whole- voted Republican in every election since the founding of the Republican Party in 1856 until 1912, when both the county and the state were won by Democrat Woodrow Wilson. Four years later, Wilson's margin of victory in Hillsborough County enabled him to narrowly win the state as a whole despite losing the majority of counties, and making New Hampshire the only state to vote Democratic in New England and the entire Northeast in 1916.

In 1928, Hillsborough was the only county in New Hampshire to vote for Democrat Al Smith over Republican Herbert Hoover, and in the 1930s Franklin Roosevelt would solidify Democratic dominance there. In 1936, FDR would carry only 3 of New Hampshire's 10 counties, but his strong win in Hillsborough allowed him to narrowly win the state while neighboring Vermont and Maine were the only states in the nation to vote against him. In the 1940s, Roosevelt would take over 60% of the vote Hillsborough County, allowing him to win the state of New Hampshire by more comfortable margins in 1940 and 1944. The county would vote Democratic in every presidential election that followed until the 1970s, except for a win by Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1956, although it was still the only county in the state where Eisenhower failed to break 60% of the vote.

In the 1970s, shifting partisan allegiances and the growth of conservative Boston exurbs in southern New Hampshire caused a dramatic shift in Hillsborough County's politics, which also caused the state as a whole to become more conservative. Beginning in 1972, the county became reliably Republican in presidential elections, peaking in 1984, when Ronald Reagan would take over 70% of the vote there.

Although still one of the more Republican regions of the state, in the following years Democrats have made inroads and today it is an important swing county. Both Republicans George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush would win it twice each, but Democrat Bill Clinton won it in 1996, and Barack Obama has won it twice in both 2008 and 2012, bolstering his wins of the state's electoral votes each time. In the 2012 presidential election, Time had listed Hillsborough as one of five critical counties affecting the outcome in the swing state of New Hampshire. Obama ended up winning with a margin of 50%-49%.[12] Donald Trump narrowly carried the county in 2016.

County Commission

The executive power of Hillsborough County's government is held by three county commissioners, each representing one of the three commissioner districts within the county.[14]

Districts Name Hometown Party
District 1 Toni Pappas (Chair) Manchester, NH Republican
District 2 Paul Bergeron (Clerk) Nashua, NH Democratic
District 3 Robert Rowe (Vice Chair) Amherst, NH Republican

In addition to the County Commission, there are five directly-elected officials: they include County Attorney, Register of Deeds, County Sheriff, Register of Probate, and County Treasurer.[15]

Office Name
County Attorney Michael Conlon (D)
Register of Deeds Edward Sapienza (I)
County Sheriff Jim Hardy (R)
Register of Probate Elizabeth Ropp (D)
County Treasurer David Fredette (R)

Legislative branch

The legislative branch of Hillsborough County is made up of all of the members of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from the county. In total, as of August 2018 there are 122 members from 45 different districts.

Affiliation Members Voting share
Democratic Party 80 65.6%
Republican Party 42 34.4%
Total 122 100%

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Villages

Former towns

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 24, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on December 27, 2014. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  4. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  5. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  6. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  7. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  8. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  9. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  10. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 7, 2017.
  11. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 7, 2017.
  12. ^ "The White House - Obama's Path to Victory", Time, pp. 16–17, November 19, 2012
  13. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 9, 2018.
  14. ^ http://sos.nh.gov/2016CountyGen.aspx?id=8589963641
  15. ^ http://hcnh.org/Departments

External links

Coordinates: 42°55′N 71°43′W / 42.92°N 71.72°W

Baboosic Lake

Baboosic Lake (buh-BOO-sik) is a 228.5-acre (92.5 ha) lake located on the border of Amherst and Merrimack, in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. The lake drains into Baboosic Brook, a tributary of the Merrimack River.

Baboosic is a "warm water lake" and supports fish species such as chain pickerel, largemouth bass, yellow perch, catfish, and many sunfish. During winter months the lake freezes and is suitable for ice fishing, ice skating and snowmobiling.

Baboosic was once a popular destination for vacationers who traveled via the long-gone Boston & Maine Railroad Manchester & Milford branch train.

A Jewish summer camp for children ages 8–15, called Camp Young Judaea, is on the lake.

Beards Brook

Beards Brook or Beard Brook is a 12.5-mile-long (20.1 km) stream located in southern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the North Branch of the Contoocook River, part of the Merrimack River watershed.

Beards Brook begins at the outlet of Island Pond in the town of Washington, New Hampshire. The brook descends rapidly northeast to the village of East Washington, then turns south and enters Hillsborough. A significant tributary is Shedd Brook, entering from the west in Hillsborough. Beards Brook joins the North Branch of the Contoocook near Hillsborough village, just upstream of the Contoocook River.

Black Brook (Merrimack River tributary)

Black Brook is an 11.4-mile-long (18.3 km) stream located in southern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Merrimack River, which flows to the Gulf of Maine.

Black Brook begins at the outlet of Kimball Pond in Dunbarton, New Hampshire. The brook travels southeast into Goffstown and then Manchester, joining the Merrimack just upstream from Amoskeag Falls.

Crotched Mountain

Crotched Mountain is a small mountain in western Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, in the United States. The 2,063-foot (629 m) summit of the mountain is in the town of Francestown, while the western slopes of the mountain rise in the town of Bennington, and a long southern ridge of the mountain is in Greenfield. The mountain was named for its appearance. Early settlers thought its V-shaped peaks resembled the fork or "crotch" of a tree.The Crotched Mountain Ski & Ride occupies the northern slopes of the mountain. It has 25 trails, 5 chairlifts, and 900 feet (270 m) of vertical drop. The Crotched Mountain Rehabilitation Center occupies a portion of the mountain's southern ridge in Greenfield.

The mountain was the site of the world's first wind farm. In 1980, US Windpower installed 20 wind turbines rated at 30 kilowatts each, on the shoulder of Crotched Mountain. The company went out of business and the wind turbines were dismantled years ago.

Deering, New Hampshire

Deering is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 1,912 at the 2010 census.

Hillsborough, New Hampshire

Hillsborough, frequently spelled Hillsboro, is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 6,011 at the 2010 census. The town is home to Fox State Forest and part of Low State Forest.

The main village of the town, where 1,976 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined as the Hillsborough census-designated place (CDP), and encompasses the main urban area of the town, located along the Contoocook River at the junction of New Hampshire Route 149 with Henniker Street and Main Street. The town also includes the villages of Hillsborough Center, Hillsborough Upper Village, Hillsborough Lower Village, and Emerald Lake Village.

Hudson, New Hampshire

Hudson is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. It is located along the Massachusetts state line. The population was 24,467 at the 2010 census, with an estimated population of 25,139 in 2017. It is the tenth-largest municipality (town or city) in the state, by population.The primary settlement in town, where 7,336 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined as the Hudson census-designated place (CDP) and is located at the junctions of New Hampshire routes 102, 111 and 3A, directly across the Merrimack River from the city of Nashua.

MacDowell Colony

The MacDowell Colony is an artists' colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, United States, founded in 1907 by composer Edward MacDowell and his wife, pianist and philanthropist Marian MacDowell. After he died in 1908, Marian forged ahead, establishing the Colony through a nonprofit association in honor of her husband, raising funds to transform her farm into a quiet retreat for creative artists to work. She led the colony for almost 25 years, against a background of two world wars, the Great Depression, and other challenges.

The mission of The MacDowell Colony is to nurture the arts by offering creative individuals of the highest talent an inspiring environment in which they can produce enduring works of the imagination.

Over the years, an estimated 8,300 artists have been supported in residence with nearly 15,000 Fellowships, including the winners of at least 86 Pulitzer Prizes, 828 Guggenheim Fellowships, 107 Rome Prizes, 31 National Book Awards, 30 Tony Awards, 32 MacArthur Fellowships, 15 Grammys, 8 Oscars, and 8 National Medals for the Arts. The colony has accepted visual and interdisciplinary artists, architects, filmmakers, composers, playwrights, poets, and writers, both well-known and unknown.

Milford, New Hampshire

Milford is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States, on the Souhegan River. The population was 15,115 at the 2010 census. It is the retail and manufacturing center of a six-town area known informally as the Souhegan Valley.

The town center of Milford, where 8,835 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined as the Milford census-designated place (CDP), and is located at the junction of New Hampshire routes 13 and 101A.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.There are 106 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 2 National Historic Landmarks.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 3, 2019.

Nissitissit River

The Nissitissit River is a 10.5-mile-long (16.9 km) river located in southern New Hampshire and northern Massachusetts in the United States. It is a tributary of the Nashua River, itself a tributary of the Merrimack River, which flows to the Gulf of Maine. This river is part of the Nashua River Watershed.

The Nissitissit River begins at the outlet of Potanipo Pond in the town of Brookline, New Hampshire. It flows southeast at a very mild gradient, crossing the southwest corner of Hollis, New Hampshire before entering Massachusetts, where it joins the Nashua River in the town of Pepperell.

Nubanusit Brook

Nubanusit Brook is a 14.3-mile-long (23.0 km) stream located in southern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Contoocook River, part of the Merrimack River watershed.

Nubanusit Brook begins at the outlet of Nubanusit Lake in Nelson, New Hampshire. The brook flows south into Harrisville, interrupted by Harrisville Pond and Skatutakee Lake, then flows east to the MacDowell Reservoir (constructed for flood control) in Peterborough. The brook turns south, passes the village of West Peterborough, and reaches the Contoocook River after passing through Peterborough village.

Nubanusit Brook was very important to the establishment and development of Harrisville and Peterborough because many dams were built along it to provide water power to mills. These included substantial textile mills in Harrisville, West Peterborough, and Peterborough, as well as smaller mills along the brook's course.

Pelham, New Hampshire

Pelham is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 12,897 at the 2010 census, and in 2017 the estimated population was 13,681.

Peterborough, New Hampshire

Peterborough is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 6,284 at the 2010 census. The central settlement in town, with 3,103 people at the 2010 census, is defined as the Peterborough census-designated place (CDP) and is located along the Contoocook River at the junction of U.S. Route 202 and New Hampshire Route 101. The community is 38 miles (61 km) west of Manchester and 72 miles (116 km) northwest of Boston.

Salmon Brook (Merrimack River tributary)

Salmon Brook is one of the 6 major tributaries of the Merrimack River in northeastern Massachusetts in the United States. Its watershed is 31 square miles (80 km2) and is one of the 14 subwatersheds of the Merrimack River. It passes through Groton, Dunstable, and Tyngsborough, Massachusetts, and then through Nashua, New Hampshire.

Sharon, New Hampshire

Sharon is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 352 at the 2010 census. It is home to the Sharon Arts Center, part of the New Hampshire Institute of Art.

South Branch Piscataquog River

The South Branch of the Piscataquog River is a 20.5-mile-long (33.0 km) river located in southern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Piscataquog River, part of the Merrimack River watershed.

The South Branch of the Piscataquog begins at the outlet of Pleasant Pond in Francestown, New Hampshire. The river travels south-southeast until entering New Boston, where it turns northeast to flow to the Piscataquog River just over the town line in Goffstown. For most of its route, the South Branch passes through rolling, hilly country, occasionally dropping over small waterfalls. New Hampshire Route 13 follows the river closely from New Boston to Goffstown.

Stony Brook (Souhegan River tributary)

Stony Brook is a 10.6-mile-long (17.1 km) river located in southern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Souhegan River, which flows to the Merrimack River and ultimately to the Gulf of Maine.

Stony Brook rises in the town of Greenfield, New Hampshire, on the northern slopes of North Pack Monadnock Mountain. It flows southeast through the town of Lyndeborough, reaching the Souhegan in the mill town of Wilton.

It is paralleled for most of its length by New Hampshire Route 31 and by the former Hillsboro Branch of the Boston and Maine Railroad.

Wilton, New Hampshire

Wilton is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 3,677 at the 2010 census. Like many small New England towns it grew up around water-powered textile mills, but is now a rural bedroom community with some manufacturing and service employment. Wilton is home to the High Mowing School, a private preparatory school.

The compact town center, where 1,163 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as the Wilton census-designated place and is located near the junction of New Hampshire Routes 31 and 101, at the confluence of Stony Brook with the Souhegan River.

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