High School Football National Championship

The High School Football National Championship is a national championship honor awarded to the best high school football team(s) in the United States of America based on rankings from USA Today[1] and the National Prep Poll. There have been some efforts over the years at organizing a single-game playoff for the national championship. Sometimes a dominant team in one state would defeat a dominant team in a neighboring state after the regular season and then would self-claim the national championship. However, sometimes such a game could not be scheduled, like in 1936 after Washington High School of Massillon, Ohio, refused to withhold its black players in a proposed game with segregated Central High School of Knoxville, Tennessee. Central High subsequently proclaimed itself national champion that year. On December 31, 1938, duPont Manual of Louisville, Kentucky, and New Britain of Connecticut played in an actual national championship game in Baton Rouge with the Louisiana Sports Association as the formal sponsor – and, by extension, the Sugar Bowl Committee, which held a series of sporting events leading up to the Sugar Bowl game itself. Manual won, 28–20.[2] The following year, on December 30, the game featured Pine Bluff, Arkansas, which defeated Baton Rouge High School by a score of 26–0.[2] This series of games proved difficult to organize, due to some states' prohibition of postseason play. Pine Bluff, for example, had to receive a special waiver from its state to participate in the game. In 1962, Florida state champion Miami Senior High beat Baltimore Polytechnic in the Orange Bowl and was recognized by Imperial Sports Syndicate of California as a national champion.

Selectors

Selector Years
National Sports News Service (NSNS) 1910–1916, 1918–1943, 1946–1999
Louisiana Sports Association (LSA) 1938–39
USA Today (USA) 1982–present
National Prep Poll (NPP) 1987–present
MaxPreps Freeman Computer Rankings (Freeman) 2004–present
MaxPreps Xcellent 25 Rankings (Xcellent25) 2008–present
High School Football America Top 25 (Algorithm) 2012–present

National Champions by year

Year Champion(s) Record Coach Selector(s)
1910 Oak Park, IL 10–2 Robert Zuppke NSNS
1911 Oak Park, IL 10–0 Robert Zuppke NSNS
1912 Oak Park, IL 10–0 Robert Zuppke NSNS
1913 Oak Park, IL 10–1 Glenn Thistlewaite NSNS
1914 Everett, MA 13–0 Cleo O'Donnell NSNS
1915 Detroit, MI, Central 11–0–1 Edbert C. Buss NSNS
Everett, MA 11–0–1 Cleo O'Donnell NSNS
1916 San Diego High School San Diego, CA

Scott, Toledo, Ohio

12–0–0

10–0–0

Nibs Price

Tom Merrell

NSNS

NSNS

1917 No Known Champion
1918 Harrisburg, PA, Tech 9–0 Paul Smith NSNS
1919 Harrisburg, PA, Tech 12–0 Paul Smith NSNS
1920 Everett, WA 9–0–1 Enoch Bagshaw NSNS
Oak Park, IL 9–0–1 Glenn Thistlewaite NSNS
1921 Jacksonville, FL, Duval 8–0 Unknown NSNS
1922 Toledo, OH, Scott 9–0 Dr. William A. Neill NSNS
1923 East Cleveland, OH, Shaw 9–1 John Snavely NSNS
Toledo, OH, Scott 10–0 Dr. William A. Neill NSNS
1924 Toledo, OH, Waite 10–0 Joe C. Collins NSNS
1925 Pine Bluff, AR 16–0 Foy Hammons NSNS
1926 Tuscaloosa, AL 9–0 Paul Burnum NSNS
1927 Waco, TX 14–0 Paul Tyson NSNS
1928 Medford, OR 9–0 Prink Callison NSNS
1929 Tuscaloosa, AL 9–0 Paul Burnum NSNS
1930 Phoenix, AZ, Union 13–0 R.R. Robinson NSNS
1931 Ashland, KY 10–0 Paul Jenkins NSNS
1932 Toledo, OH, Waite 12–0 Donald McCallister NSNS
1933 Oklahoma City, OK, Capitol Hill 12–0 Jim Lookabaugh NSNS
1934 Canton, OH, McKinley 11–0 Jimmy Aiken NSNS
1935 Massillon, OH, Washington 10–0 Paul Brown NSNS
1936 Massillon, OH, Washington 10–0 Paul Brown NSNS
1937 Chicago, IL, Austin 10–0 William Heiland NSNS
1938 Louisville, KY, Manual 10–0 Ray Baer LSA,[2] NSNS
1939 Massillon, OH, Washington 10–0 Paul Brown NSNS
Pine Bluff, AR 11–0–1 Allen Dunaway LSA[2]
1940 Massillon, OH, Washington 10–0 Paul Brown NSNS
1941 Chicago, IL, Leo 11–0 Whitey Cronin NSNS
1942 Miami, FL 9–0 Lyles Alley NSNS
1943 Miami, FL 9–0 Tom Moore NSNS
1944 No Award Made
1945 No Award Made
1946 Little Rock, AR, Senior 14–0 Raymond Burnett NSNS
1947 East Chicago, IN, Roosevelt 9–0 Unknown NSNS
Lynn, MA, Classical 11–1 Bill Joyce [1] NSNS
1948 Waco, TX 14–0 Carl Price NSNS
1949 Wichita Falls, TX 14–0 Joe Golding NSNS
1950 Massillon, OH, Washington 10–0 Chuck Mather NSNS
1951 Weymouth, MA 9–0 Harry Arlanson [2] NSNS
1952 Massillon, OH, Washington 10–0 Chuck Mather NSNS
1953 Massillon, OH, Washington 10–0 Chuck Mather NSNS
1954 Vallejo, CA 9–0 Bob Patterson NSNS
1955 San Diego, CA 12–0 Duane Maley NSNS
1956 Abilene, TX 14–0 Charles Moser NSNS
1957 Little Rock, AR, Central 12–0 Wilson Matthews NSNS
Downey HS, Downey, California 11–0 NSNS
1958 Oak Ridge, TN, Oak Ridge 10–0 Jack Armstrong NSNS
1959 Massillon, OH, Washington 10–0 Leo Strang NSNS
1960 Miami, Fla. 8–0–2 Ottis Mooney NSNS
1961 Massillon, OH, Washington 11–0 Leo Strang NSNS
1962 Valdosta, GA 12–0 Wright Bazemore NSNS
1963 Chicago, IL, St. Rita 9–0 Edward Buckley NSNS
1964 Coral Gables, FL 12–0 Nick Kotys NSNS
1965 Miami, FL 12–0 Robert Carlton NSNS
1966 Pico Rivera, CA, El Rancho 13–0 Ernest Johnson NSNS
1967 Austin, TX, Reagan 14–0 Travis Raven NSNS
Coral Gables, FL 13–0 Nick Kotys NSNS
1968 Austin, TX, Reagan 15–0 Travis Raven NSNS
Coral Gables, FL 12–1 Nick Kotys NSNS
1969 Coral Gables, FL 11–0 Nick Kotys NSNS
Valdosta, GA 12–0–1 Wright Bazemore NSNS
1970 Reagan, Austin, Texas 14–1 Travis Raven NSNS
1971 Valdosta, GA 13–0 Wright Bazemore NSNS
1972 Bristol, TN 13–0 John Cropp NSNS
1973 Chattanooga, TN, Baylor 13–0 E. B. "Red" Etter NSNS
1974 Thomasville, GA 12–1 Jim Hughes NSNS
1975 Los Angeles, CA, Loyola 13–0 Marty Shaughnessy NSNS
1976 Moeller, Cincinnati, Oh 12–0 Gerry Faust NSNS
Warner Robins, Warner Robins, Ga. 13–0 Robert Davis NSNS
1977 Cincinnati, OH, Moeller 12–0 Gerry Faust NSNS
1978 Annandale, VA 14–0 Bob Hardage NSNS
1979 Cincinnati, OH, Moeller 12–0 Gerry Faust NSNS
1980 Cincinnati, OH, Moeller 13–0 Gerry Faust NSNS
1981 Warner Robins, GA 15–0 Robert Davis NSNS
1982 Cincinnati, OH, Moeller 13–0 Steve Klonne[3] NSNS, USA
1983 Berwick Area, PA 13–0 George Curry NSNS, USA
1984 Valdosta, GA 15–0 Nick Hyder NSNS, USA
1985 East St. Louis Flyers 14–0 Bob Shannon NSNS, USA
1986 Valdosta, GA 15–0 Nick Hyder NSNS, USA
1987 Fontana, CA 14–0 Dick Bruich NPP
Pittsburgh, PA, North Hills 13–0 Jack McCurry USA
Plano, TX 16–0 Gerald Brence NSNS
1988 Pensacola, FL, Pine Forest 14–0 Carl Madison NSNS, USA
Prichard, AL, Vigor 13–0 Harold Clark NPP
1989 Cleveland, OH, St. Ignatius 13–0 Chuck Kyle USA
Odessa, TX, Permian 16–0 Gary Gaines NPP, NSNS
1990 Houston, Texas Aldine High School 15–0 Bill Smith NPP
Lawton, OK, Eisenhower 14–0 Tim Reynolds USA
Ruston, LA 14–0 Jimmy "Chick" Childress NSNS
1991 Indianapolis, IN, Ben Davis 14–0 Dick Dullaghan NPP, NSNS
LaGrange, GA 15–0 Gary Guthrie USA
1992 Berwick Area, PA 15–0 George Curry USA
Valdosta, GA 14–0 Nick Hyder NPP, NSNS
1993 Cleveland, OH, St. Ignatius 14–0 Chuck Kyle NPP, NSNS, USA
1994 Concord, CA, De La Salle 13–0 Bob Ladouceur NPP, NSNS
Santa Ana, CA, Mater Dei 14–0 Bruce Rollinson USA
1995 Berwick Area, PA 15–0 George Curry USA
Cleveland, OH, St. Ignatius 14–0 Chuck Kyle NPP, NSNS
1996 Hampton, VA 14–0 Mike Smith NPP, NSNS
Santa Ana, CA, Mater Dei 14–0 Bruce Rollinson USA
1997 Canton, OH, McKinley 14–0 Thom McDaniels USA
Hampton, VA 13–0 Mike Smith NPP, NSNS
1998 Concord, CA, De La Salle 12–0 Bob Ladouceur NPP, NSNS, USA
1999 Concord, CA, De La Salle 12–0 Bob Ladouceur NSNS
Midland, TX, Lee 15–0 John Parchman USA
Shreveport, LA, Evangel Christian 15–0 Dennis Dunn NPP
2000 Concord, CA, De La Salle 13–0 Bob Ladouceur NPP, USA
2001 Concord, CA, De La Salle 12–0 Bob Ladouceur NPP, USA
2002 Concord, CA, De La Salle 13–0 Bob Ladouceur NPP, USA
2003 Concord, CA, De La Salle 13–0 Bob Ladouceur NPP, USA
2004 Southlake, TX, Carroll 16–0 Todd Dodge NPP, USA
2005 Lakeland, FL 15–0 Bill Castle USA
Southlake, TX, Carroll 16–0 Todd Dodge NPP, Freeman
2006 Lakeland, FL 15–0 Bill Castle NPP
Southlake, TX, Carroll 16–0 Todd Dodge USA, Freeman
2007 Cincinnati, OH, St. Xavier 15–0 Steve Specht NPP, Freeman
Miami, FL, Northwestern 15–0 Billy Rolle USA
2008 Fort Lauderdale, FL, St. Thomas Aquinas 15–0 George Smith NPP, USA, Freeman, Xcellent 25
2009 Ramsey, NJ, Don Bosco Prep 12–0 Greg Toal NPP, USA, Freeman, Xcellent 25
2010 Fort Lauderdale, FL, St. Thomas Aquinas 15–0 George Smith NPP
South Panola, MS 15–0 Lance Pogue USA, Freeman
2011 Ramsey, NJ, Don Bosco Prep 11–0 Greg Toal NPP, USA, Freeman, Xcellent 25
2012 River Ridge, LA, John Curtis Christian 14–0 J.T. Curtis NPP, USA, Xcellent 25
2013 Miami, FL, Booker T. Washington 16–0 Tim Harris NPP, USA, Xcellent 25
2014 Las Vegas, NV, Bishop Gorman 15–0 Tony Sanchez NPP, USA
2015 Katy, TX 16–0 Gary Joseph NPP, Xcellent 25
Moultrie, GA, Colquitt County 15–0 Rush Propst High School Football America, Prep Force
Las Vegas, NV, Bishop Gorman 15–0 Kenny Sanchez USA
2016 Las Vegas, NV, Bishop Gorman 15–0 Kenny Sanchez NPP, USA, Freeman, High School Football America, Xcellent 25
2017 Santa Ana, CA, Mater Dei 15–0 Bruce Rollinson NPP, USA, High School Football America, Freeman, Xcellent 25
2018 Santa Ana, CA, Mater Dei 13–2 Bruce Rollinson USA, High School Football America, Freeman
Houston, TX, North Shore 16–0 Jon Kay Xcellent 25, NPP

National Championships by school (multiple winners only)

School Championships Years
Massillon, OH, Washington 9 1935, 1936, 1939, 1940, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1959, 1961
Concord, CA, De La Salle 7 1994, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003
Valdosta, GA 6 1962, 1969, 1971, 1984, 1986, 1992
Miami, FL 5 1942, 1943, 1960, 1962,1965
Cincinnati, OH, Moeller 5 1976, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1982
Oak Park, IL 5 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1920
Coral Gables, FL 4 1964, 1967, 1968, 1969
Santa Ana, CA, Mater Dei 4 1994, 1996, 2017, 2018
Austin, TX, Reagan 3 1967, 1968, 1970
Berwick, PA 3 1983, 1992, 1995
Cleveland, OH, St. Ignatius 3 1989, 1993, 1995
Southlake, TX, Carroll 3 2004, 2005, 2006
Las Vegas, NV, Bishop Gorman 3 2014, 2015, 2016
Canton, OH, McKinley 2 1934, 1997
Everett, MA 2 1914, 1915
Fort Lauderdale, FL, St. Thomas Aquinas 2 2008, 2010
Lakeland, FL 2 2005, 2006
Little Rock, AR, Central 2 1946, 1957
Odessa, TX, Permian 2 1972, 1989
Pine Bluff, AR 2 1925, 1939
Ramsey, NJ, Don Bosco Prep 2 2009, 2011
San Diego High School, San Diego, CA 2 1916, 1955
Toledo, OH, Scott 2 1922, 1923
Toledo, OH, Waite 2 1924, 1932
Tuscaloosa, AL 2 1926, 1929
Waco, TX, 2 1927, 1948
Warner Robins, GA 2 1976, 1981

See also

Sources

  • http://www.highschoolsports.net/super25/Football/Varsity/Boys
  • Huff, Doug & Tennis, Mark. (2001) National High School Football Record Book, Student Sports. ISBN 0-9708676-0-3

References

  1. ^ See USA Today All-USA high school football team#2010 team, for "USA Today Super 25" teams and "USA Today Super 25 regional rankings" (top 10 in each region: East, South, Midwest, West).
  2. ^ a b c d George Abraham (December 31, 1939). "Hutson Twins Lead Zebras to 26–0 Win: Devastating Offensive Too Much for B.R.H.S." Baton Rouge Morning Advocate (p. 1).
  3. ^ Groeschen, Tom (2001-08-24). "Moeller coach Bob Crable draws spotlight". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved 2008-01-26. Klonne was asked to resign despite a 19-season record of 169–48, including two state titles (1982, '85) and a USA Today national championship in 1982.

http://www.ohsaa.org/sports/ft/boys/PastResults/results98.PDF

Alliance of American Football

The Alliance of American Football (AAF) is a professional American football league, founded by Charlie Ebersol and Bill Polian. It began play on February 9, 2019, six days after the National Football League's (NFL) Super Bowl LIII championship game. The AAF consists of eight centrally owned and operated teams. All teams except Salt Lake and Memphis are located in cities on or south of the 35th parallel and all teams except Birmingham are located in metropolitan areas that have at least one major professional sports franchise. Of the eight teams in the league, all but Arizona and Atlanta are located in markets lacking an NFL team.

Bob Books (American football)

Robert Garfield Books (March 1, 1903 – April 4, 1958) was an American football fullback who played one season with the Frankford Yellow Jackets of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Dickinson College. He first enrolled at Harrisburg Technical High School in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania before transferring to Mercersburg Academy in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania.

Bob Shannon

Bob Shannon (born 1945) is an American former high school football coach. He is best known for coaching the East St. Louis Flyers to six Illinois and two national championships.

Bristol Tennessee High School

Bristol Tennessee High School (more commonly called Tennessee High) is a public high school located in Bristol, Tennessee, operated as part of the Bristol City School System.

College Football Hall of Fame

The College Football Hall of Fame is a hall of fame and interactive attraction devoted to college football. The National Football Foundation (NFF) founded the Hall in 1951 to immortalize the players and coaches of college football.

From 1995 to 2012, the Hall was located in South Bend, Indiana.

In August 2014, the Chick-fil-A College Football Hall of Fame opened in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. The facility is a 94,256 square feet (8,756.7 m2) attraction located in the heart of Atlanta's sports, entertainment and tourism district, and is adjacent to the Georgia World Congress Center and Centennial Olympic Park.

Don McCallister

Donald McCallister (March 13, 1904 – August 5, 1977) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at South Carolina University from 1935 to 1937 and at Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont from 1938 to 1941, compiling a career college football coaching record of 32–29–2. As a high school coach at Waite High School in Toledo, Ohio, McCallister's 1932 squad won a mythical High School Football National Championship.McCallister died on August 5, 1977, as San Gabriel Community Hospital in San Gabriel, California.

Freedom Football League

The Freedom Football League (FFL) is a planned professional spring-summer American football league.

Gil Bartosh

Gilbert C. Bartosh Sr. (May 21, 1930 – June 4, 2016) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) from 1974 to 1976, compiling a record of 6–28.

Considered the greatest player ever to come out of Granger, Bartosh was dubbed the "Granger Ghost." He starred at Granger from 1945 to 48 before a four-year career at Texas Christian University (TCU), where he played quarterback under coach Dutch Meyer and led the Southwest Conference in total offense his junior season in 1951, when he was also named an All-American. In 1952 however, he had to take a backseat behind Ray McKown. Bartosh was drafted by the Baltimore Colts as the 314th Pick (Round 27) of the 1952 NFL Draft, but never played in the NFL. He did play for the British Columbia Lions in 1955 (leading the team in touchdowns).

After suffering a shoulder injury during one of his practices he quit pro football and started his coaching career. Bartosh was the head football coach at Milby High School in Houston, Texas from 1959 to 1961, winning two District Championships. In 1962, he became head coach at the newly opened Lee High School, Houston, serving there through the 1966 season. His 1964 and 1965 teams were zone champions. After a three-year stint as assistant at Rice University, he became head coach at Permian High School in Odessa, Texas in 1971. Bartosh guided Permian to a perfect 14–0 season in 1972, winning the Texas 5A state championship as well as the mythical high school football national championship along the way. He then left Permian for an assistant coaching job under Emory Bellard at Texas A&M University. In 1974, he succeeded Tommy Hudspeth as head coach at UTEP.

Bartosh was inducted into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame in 1989. He died on June 4, 2016 in Liberty Hill, Texas where he lived.

Independent Women's Football League

The Independent Women's Football League (IWFL) is a full-contact Women's American football league that was founded in 2000 and began play in 2001. It is one of three 11-on-11 U.S. football leagues for women, along with the Women's Football Alliance and the United States Women's Football League, and the oldest of the three. Laurie Frederick, Deborah DelToro, and K Disney are the league's founders.

The players are not paid to play; on the contrary, players must contribute funds to cover part of their expenses.

JT Daniels

Jonathan Tyler Daniels (born February 2, 2000) is an American football quarterback for the USC Trojans.

Jacory Harris

Jacory Sherrod Harris (born May 12, 1990) is a Canadian football quarterback for the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League (CFL). Harris started for Miami Northwestern High School during his last two years; he was unbeaten (30-0) and led the team to two state championships. In his senior year, Harris broke the state record for passing touchdowns and won the 2007 High School Football National Championship. He was named Florida's Mr. Football. During his freshman year of college in 2008 with the Miami Hurricanes, he split time with Robert Marve in a two-quarterback system. After the Emerald Bowl in late December, Marve transferred to Purdue, effectively making Harris the undisputed starter for the rest of his career as a Hurricane. He signed with the Philadelphia Eagles as an undrafted free agent in May 2012.

Miami Northwestern Senior High School

Miami Northwestern Senior High School is a public 4-year high school located in Miami, Florida, United States, serving students in grades 9-12 from the Liberty City neighborhood of Miami. The school colors are old gold and royal blue. The average annual enrollment is approximately 1,800 students. Miami Northwestern was founded in 1955 to serve the increasing population of northern Miami. Shortly after the school's inception, the Bull was chosen as the official school mascot from the former Dorsey High School. Miami Northwestern originally served as an all-black high school. Beginning in 1966, Dade County high schools stopped being segregated, and most students from Booker T. Washington transferred to Northwestern (and Miami Jackson Senior High School) in 1967–1968.

Miami Northwestern is a member of the Florida High School Athletic Association and offers a variety of sports programs. Athletic teams compete in the 6A division and are known as the "Bulls". The school's football program has experienced significant success throughout its history, including winning a High School Football National Championship in 2007. Extracurricular activities are offered, including the performing arts, school publications, and clubs. Notable alumni of the school include Barrington Irving, the first black pilot to fly solo around the world, and Teddy Bridgewater, a starting quarterback for the Minnesota Vikings. In 2011, the school received a "B" grade on the FCAT report card, the first time an inner-city Miami school had achieved such a high mark.

National Arena League

The National Arena League (NAL) is a professional indoor football league that began play in 2017. It consists of six teams based in the East Coast of the United States.

National championship

A national championship(s) is the top achievement for any sport or contest within a league of a particular nation or nation state. The title is usually awarded by contests, ranking systems, stature, ability, etc. This determines the best team, individual (or other entity) in a particular nation and in a particular field. Often, the use of the term cup or championship is just a choice of words.

Pine Bluff High School

Pine Bluff High School is a comprehensive public high school in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, United States. It is the largest of four public high schools in the city and Jefferson County. Established in 1868, the school's interscholastic sports programs are one of the nation's most successful with a football national championship and one of the state's highest number of state championships in football, baseball and track and field.

United States Women's Football League

The United States Women's Football League (USWFL) is a full-contact women's American football league that opened with exhibition play in 2010 and subsequently played its first regular season in 2011. The league was known as the "Women's Spring Football League" from 2009–2015. It is the newest of three full-contact, 11-on-11 football leagues for women, along with the Independent Women's Football League and the Women's Football Alliance.

The USWFL played with 11-player and 8-player divisions from 2011 through 2013. In 2014, the league split into two leagues, with the 11-woman division retaining the WSFL name and the 8-woman division taking the name the Women's Eights Football League (W8FL). In 2016, the league played only 11-woman football with the Cincinnati Sizzle taking the league crown.

United States women's national American football team

The United States Women's National American Football Team is the official American football senior national team of the United States.

Women's Football Alliance

The Women's Football Alliance (WFA) is a full-contact Women's American football league that began play in 2009. It is one of three full-contact, 11-on-11 football leagues for women, along with the Independent Women's Football League and the United States Women's Football League, and the largest of the three. The league is owned and operated by Jeff and Lisa King of Exeter, California.

XFL (2020)

The XFL is a planned professional American football league owned by Vince McMahon's Alpha Entertainment, and is headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut. It is a successor to the previous XFL, which was controlled by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF, now WWE) and NBC, and ran for a single season in 2001. The league will follow a similar structure as the original XFL did in 2001, with eight teams, centrally owned and operated by the league and spread across the United States in markets currently or recently represented by a National Football League (NFL) franchise, competing in a ten-game season and a two-week postseason in the winter and spring months.

In announcing the reformed XFL, McMahon stated that while it would share its name and trademark with the previous incarnation, it will not rely on professional wrestling-inspired features and entertainment elements as its predecessor did, instead aiming to create a league with fewer off-field controversies and faster, simpler play compared to the NFL.

Team award
Overall trophies
Overall media awards
Positional awards
All-Americans
Head Coaching awards
Academic, inspirational, and versatility awards
Regional awards

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