Hi Myers

Henry Harrison "Hy" Myers (April 27, 1889 – May 1, 1965) was a professional baseball player. He was an outfielder over all or part of 14 seasons (1909–1925) with the Brooklyn Superbas/Robins, St. Louis Cardinals, and Cincinnati Reds.

In 1919 he led the National League in RBIs (73), triples (14), slugging (.436) and total bases (223). He appeared in 154 games the next year for the pennant-winning Robins, again leading the league in triples (22). He participated in the 1916 and 1920 World Series for Brooklyn, losing both times and hitting only .208 (10-48).

In a 14 year career, Myers was a .281 hitter (1380-4910) with 32 home runs, 555 runs, 179 doubles, 100 triples and 559 RBI in 1,310 games played. As a member of the Dodgers he had four 5-hit games.

He was born in 1889 in East Liverpool, Ohio and died on May 1, 1965 in Minerva, Ohio at the age of 76. He was buried in Grove Hill Cemetery in Hanoverton, Ohio.

Hy Myers
Hy-myers
Outfielder
Born: April 27, 1889
East Liverpool, Ohio
Died: May 1, 1965 (aged 76)
Minerva, Ohio
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 30, 1909, for the Brooklyn Superbas
Last MLB appearance
May 3, 1925, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.281
Hits1380
Runs batted in559
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1919 Major League Baseball season

The 1919 Major League Baseball season, is best remembered for the Black Sox Scandal, in which the Chicago White Sox threw (purposely lost) the World Series to the Cincinnati Reds, 5–3, in order to illegally gain money from gambling. This scandal resulted in commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis banning eight players from baseball for life. The season began on April 19, 1919, when the Brooklyn Robins defeated the Boston Braves 5–2 at Braves Field in the first game of a double header. The regular season ended on September 29 with the New York Yankees defeating the Philadelphia Athletics 4–2 at Shibe Park, with the infamous 1919 World Series opening two days later in Cincinnati.

1920 World Series

In the 1920 World Series, the Cleveland Indians beat the Brooklyn Dodgers, then known interchangeably as the Robins in reference to their manager Wilbert Robinson, in seven games, five games to two. This series was a best-of-nine series, like the first World Series in 1903 and the World Series of 1919 and 1921. The only World Series triple play, the first World Series grand slam and the first World Series home run by a pitcher all occurred in Game 5 of this Series. The Indians won the series in memory of their former shortstop Ray Chapman, who had been killed earlier in the season when struck in the head by a pitched ball.

The triple play was unassisted and turned by Cleveland's Bill Wambsganss in Game 5. Wambsganss, playing second base, caught a line drive off the bat of Clarence Mitchell, stepped on second base to put out Pete Kilduff, and tagged Otto Miller coming from first base. It was the second of fifteen (as of 2016) unassisted triple plays in major-league baseball history, and it remains the only one in postseason play. Mitchell made history again in the eighth inning by hitting into a double play, accounting for five outs in two straight at-bats.

The fifth game also saw the first grand slam in World Series history (hit by Cleveland's Elmer Smith) and the first Series home run by a pitcher (Cleveland's Jim Bagby, Sr.). And in that same game, Brooklyn outhit Cleveland but lost 8–1.

Cleveland had won the American League pennant in a close race with the Chicago White Sox and the New York Yankees. The Sox's participation in the Black Sox Scandal the previous year had caught up to them late in the season, and their star players were suspended with three games left in the season, when they were in a virtual tie with the Indians. The Yankees, with their recently acquired star Babe Ruth, were almost ready to start their eventual World Series dynasty. For Cleveland, it would prove to be one of their few successes in a long history of largely either poor or not-quite-good enough clubs.

It is notable that all seven games of the 1920 World Series were won by the team who scored first. In fact, Game 4 was the only game in which the losing team scored a run before the winning team had scored all of its runs. The lead never changed hands in any game.

This would be the last World Series until 1980 to feature two franchises that had not previously won a championship.

Connellsville Cokers (baseball)

The Connellsville Cokers, based in Connellsville, Pennsylvania, USA, were a professional minor league baseball team that played in the Western Pennsylvania League in 1907, the Pennsylvania–West Virginia League in 1908 and 1909 and the Ohio–Pennsylvania League in 1912. An un-nicknamed Connellsville team then played in the PWVL in 1914. They were the first professional baseball team to be based in Connellsville.Notable players include major leaguers Roy Ellam, Hi Myers and Huck Wallace.

List of Los Angeles Dodgers seasons

The Los Angeles Dodgers are the second most successful franchise in the National League and the third-most successful and second-most wealthy in Major League Baseball after the New York Yankees. The franchise was formerly based in Brooklyn and known originally as the "Grays" or "Trolley Dodgers" after the trams which supporters had to avoid to enter games. Later it became known successively as the "Bridegrooms", "Superbas", "Dodgers" and "Robins"; the present "Dodgers" was firmly established in 1932.

The franchise has won the World Series six times and lost a further 13, and like the Yankees and Cardinals have never lost 100 games in a season since World War I, with their worst record since then being in 1992 with 63 wins and their best records ever being in 1953 with 105 wins and both 1942 and 2017 with 104. Their most successful period, between 1947 and 1966 with ten World Series appearances and only two seasons with 71 or more losses (one of them the year they moved to Los Angeles after a dispute over stadium funding), was famous for the Dodgers becoming the first Major League Baseball team to incorporate African American players, led by Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a center fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field – the baseball fielding position between left field and right field. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the center fielder is assigned the number 8.

Tris Speaker is the all-time leader in errors committed as a center fielder with 226 career. Ty Cobb (202) is second all-time and the only other center fielder to commit over 200 career errors.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a center fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field – the baseball fielding position between left field and right field. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the center fielder is assigned the number 8.

Willie Mays is the all-time leader in putouts as a center fielder with 7,029 career. Mays is the only center fielder to record more than 7,000 career putouts as a center fielder.

Sioux City Packers

The Sioux City Packers was the primary name of the minor league baseball team based in Sioux City, Iowa playing in various seasons between 1888 and 1960.

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