Herpestes

Herpestes is a genus of the mongoose family (Herpestidae). It is the type genus of the family. It contains the following ten species, with a number of subspecies, and one extinct species:[1]

Herpestes
Temporal range: Oligocene to present
Herpestes edwardsii at Hyderaba
Herpestes edwardsii
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
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Genus:
Herpestes

Illiger, 1811
Species
Herpestes

Species

Image Scientific name Common Name Distribution
Herpestes brachyurus Short-tailed mongoose Malay Peninsula, Borneo, Sumatra and the Philippine islands Palawan and Busuanga
Herpestes edwardsii at Hyderaba Herpestes edwardsi Indian gray mongoose West Asia and on the Indian subcontinent
Brown mongoose Herpestes fuscus Indian brown mongoose southern Western Ghats.
Herpestes ichneumon Египетский мангуст, или фараонова крыса, или ихневмо́н Herpestes ichneumon Egyptian mongoose Egypt, Morocco, Libya, Spain, Portugal, Israel, Palestine, and most of sub-Saharan Africa, except for central Democratic Republic of the Congo, and arid regions of southern Africa.
Small asian mongoose Herpestes javanicus Small Asian mongoose South and Southeast Asia.
Herpestes naso Long-nosed mongoose Cameroon, Republic of the Congo, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Niger, and Tanzania
Herpestes semitorquatus Collared mongoose Brunei, Indonesia, and Malaysia.
Ruddy mongoose Herpestes smithii Ruddy mongoose peninsular India and Sri Lanka.
Herpestes urva - Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology - DSC02477 Herpestes urva Crab-eating mongoose northeastern Indian subcontinent to Southeast Asia, southern China and Taiwan
2007-stripe-necked-mongoose Herpestes vitticollis Stripe-necked mongoose southern India to Sri Lanka.

References

  1. ^ Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. (2005). "Herpestes". Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
Bacopa monnieri

Bacopa monnieri (waterhyssop, brahmi, thyme-leafed gratiola, water hyssop, herb of grace, Indian pennywort) is a perennial, creeping herb native to the wetlands of southern and Eastern India, Australia, Europe, Africa, Asia, and North and South America. B. monnieri is an herb used in Ayurveda, where it is also known as "Brahmi", after Brahmā.

Bengal mongoose

The Bengal mongoose (Herpestes javanicus palustris) is a subspecies of the small Asian mongoose. It is also known as the marsh mongoose, not to be confused with Atilax paludinosus, which is also called the marsh mongoose. Other synonyms include Indian marsh mongoose and Bengali water mongoose.

Cape gray mongoose

The Cape gray mongoose (Galerella pulverulenta), also called the small gray mongoose, is a small mammal native to South Africa, Lesotho and southern Namibia.

Collared mongoose

The collared mongoose (Herpestes semitorquatus) is a species of mongoose in the family Herpestidae. It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, and Malaysia.

Crab-eating mongoose

The crab-eating mongoose (Herpestes urva) is a mongoose species ranging from the northeastern Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia to southern China and Taiwan. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.Brian Houghton Hodgson first described the type specimen in 1836 that originated in central Nepal, where it is locally called 'urva'.

Egyptian mongoose

The Egyptian mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon), also known as ichneumon, is a mongoose species native to the Iberian Peninsula, coastal regions along the Mediterranean Sea between North Africa and Turkey, tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublands in Africa. Because of its widespread occurrence, it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Hose's mongoose

Hose's mongoose (Herpestes brachyurus hosei) is a subspecies of the short-tailed mongoose, but it is sometimes considered a separate species instead, Herpestes hosei. It is only known from a single specimen, an adult female taken in the Baram district, Sarawak, Malaysia, in 1893. Apart from having reddish brown short hair, straighter claws and more slender, smaller skull with a less rounded coronoid process on the lower jaw, it resembles other subspecies of the short-tailed mongoose.

Indian brown mongoose

The Indian brown mongoose (Herpestes fuscus) looks similar to the short-tailed mongoose from Southeast Asia and is sometimes believed to be only a subspecies of this latter. The Indian brown mongoose is found in southwest India and Sri Lanka.

Indian grey mongoose

The Indian grey mongoose or common grey mongoose (Herpestes edwardsi) is a mongoose species mainly found in West Asia and on the Indian subcontinent. In North Indian languages (Hindi/Punjabi) it is called Nevlaa. The grey mongoose is commonly found in open forests, scrublands and cultivated fields, often close to human habitation. It lives in burrows, hedgerows and thickets, among groves of trees, and takes shelter under rocks or bushes and even in drains. It is very bold and inquisitive but wary, seldom venturing far from cover. It climbs very well. Usually found singly or in pairs. It preys on rodents, snakes, birds’ eggs and hatchlings, lizards and variety of invertebrates. Along the Chambal River it occasionally feeds on gharial eggs. It breeds throughout the year.

Javan mongoose

The Javan mongoose (Herpestes javanicus) is a species of mongoose found in the wild in South and Southeast Asia. It has also been introduced to Hawaii, the Bahamas, Cuba, Croatia, Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, the Lesser Antilles, Belize, Honduras, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Colombia, Suriname, Venezuela, Guyana and Mafia Island. The western subspecies group is sometimes treated as a separate species, the Indian mongoose or small Indian mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus).

List of species in order Carnivora

This list contains the species in order Carnivora.

List of species protected by CITES Appendix III

This is a list of species of plants and animals protected by Appendix III of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, commonly abbreviated as CITES. There are no fungi listed in any appendix.

List of species protected by CITES Appendix I

List of species protected by CITES Appendix II

Long-nosed mongoose

The long-nosed mongoose (Herpestes naso) is a mongoose native to Cameroon, Republic of the Congo, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Nigeria, and Tanzania.

Mongoose

Mongoose is the popular English name for 29 of the 34 species in the 14 genera of the family Herpestidae, which are small feliform carnivorans native to southern Eurasia and mainland Africa. The other five species (all African) in the family are the four kusimanses in the genus Crossarchus, and the species Suricata suricatta, commonly called meerkat in English.

Six species in the family Eupleridae are endemic to the island of Madagascar. These are called "mongoose" and were originally classified as a genus within the family Herpestidae, but genetic evidence has since shown that they are more closely related to other Madagascar carnivorans in the family Eupleridae; they have been classified in the subfamily Galidiinae within Eupleridae since 2006.

Herpestidae is placed within the suborder Feliformia, together with the cat, hyena, and Viverridae families.

Namaqua slender mongoose

The Namaqua slender mongoose (Galerella sanguinea swalius), also known as the Namibian slender mongoose, is a subspecies of the slender mongoose. It is endemic to Namibia.

Ruddy mongoose

The ruddy mongoose (Herpestes smithii) is a species of mongoose found in hill forests of peninsular India and Sri Lanka. This mongoose, along with the striped-neck and Indian grey mongeese, are the only mongoose species endemic to India and Sri Lanka. The ruddy mongoose is very closely related to Indian grey mongoose, but distinguished by its slightly larger size and black-tipped tail extending for 2 to 3 inches at the distal end. There are two sub-species of this mongoose, H. smithii smithii in India, and H. smithii zeylanicus (Thomas, 1852) in Sri Lanka.

Short-tailed mongoose

The short-tailed mongoose (Herpestes brachyurus) is a species of mongoose that lives in the rainforests of Southeast Asia.

The species is red-brown to black, with black limbs. The head is more grayish, with a black spot on the chin. This species has a total length of 60 to 65 cm (including tail) and a weight of about 1.4 kg. The tail is relatively short, about 25 cm.

The short-tailed mongoose is found in lowland rainforests of Malay Peninsula, Borneo, Sumatra and the Philippine islands Palawan and Busuanga. It is common in the neighbourhood of rivers and other bodies of waters. One of its subspecies is often considered a separate species instead, the Hose's mongoose.

Slender mongoose

The slender mongoose (Galerella sanguinea), also known as the black-tipped mongoose or the black-tailed mongoose, is a very common species of mongoose of sub-Saharan Africa.

Stripe-necked mongoose

The stripe-necked mongoose (Herpestes vitticollis) is a species of mongoose found in southern India to Sri Lanka.

The stripe-necked mongoose is the largest of the Asiatic mongooses. The range distribution of the Stripe-necked

Mongoose was restricted to the southern part of India and Sri Lanka. The Stripe-necked Mongoose was recorded from many parts of the

Western Ghats. Distribution of the Stripe-necked Mongoose in Similipal Tiger Reserve, Odisha was reported by. Similipal is the southeastern extension of the Chota Nagpur plateau. Although there was a sighting record, there were no specimens from the Eastern Ghats. Five records confirm the Stripe-necked Mongoose in Papikonda National Park and adjacent reserve forests,first report from the Eastern Ghats.It has a stout body set on short legs. It is easily distinguished by the black stripe that runs laterally on both sides of its neck. The body coloration is a rusty brown to grizzled grey. The relatively short tail is mostly black, with grey at the base. The stripe-necked mongoose feeds on frogs, crabs, mouse deer, hares, rodents, fowl, and reptiles. This mongoose species is more diurnal in habits. They prefer forested areas near a fresh water source. They are often found in swamps and rice fields.

Extant Carnivora species

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