Herb Carneal

Charles Herbert "Herb" Carneal (May 10, 1923 – April 1, 2007) was an American Major League Baseball sportscaster. From 1962 through 2006, he was a play-by-play voice of Minnesota Twins radio broadcasts, becoming the lead announcer in 1967 after Ray Scott left to work exclusively with CBS. Prior to 1962, he was the voice of the Baltimore Orioles, partnering with Ernie Harwell from 1957 to 1959, and with Bob Murphy in 1960–1961. His mellow baritone voice and laid-back demeanor were well loved by Twins fans. His nickname was "The Voice of the Twins". Carneal's trademark greeting, "Hi everybody", was reminiscent of his down-home style.

A Richmond, Virginia, native, Carneal first broadcast major league games for the Philadelphia Athletics and Philadelphia Phillies in 1954. From 1957 to 1961 he was employed by the Baltimore Orioles. He also called games on CBS television for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League in the team's first four years of existence (196164), and AFL games on NBC in 1965.

Carneal's announcing career received a significant boost when he took over the Twins broadcasts, as it united him with broadcaster Halsey Hall, after whom many major league broadcasters have modeled their work. Hall's influence on Carneal's career development is legendary.

Carneal received the Ford C. Frick Award from the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996, and was inducted into the Pavek Museum of Broadcasting's Hall of Fame in 2004. He was named Minnesota Sportscaster of the Year 20 times by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association.

Beginning in 2002, Carneal scaled back his workload to providing play-by-play for half of Minnesota's home games. By 2007, he was scheduled to work only 36 games. Until 2007, Carneal worked in partnership with fellow radio commentators John Gordon and Dan Gladden.

In 2002, Carneal was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame.

Herb Carneal died on April 1, 2007, of congestive heart failure.[1] The Twins dedicated their 2007 season to Carneal, wearing patches on their sleeves in his honor.

References

  1. ^ Zulgad, Judd (April 1, 2007). "Herb Carneal dies at 83". Star Tribune. Archived from the original on April 6, 2007. Retrieved April 1, 2007.

External links

1962 Minnesota Twins season

The 1962 Minnesota Twins improved to 91–71, finishing second in the American League, five games short of the World Champion New York Yankees. 1,433,116 fans attended Twins games, the second highest total in the American League.

1963 Minnesota Twins season

The 1963 Minnesota Twins finished 91–70, third in the American League. 1,406,652 fans attended Twins games, the highest total in the American League.

1964 Minnesota Twins season

After winning 91 games the previous two seasons, the 1964 Minnesota Twins slumped to 79–83, a disappointing tie for sixth with the Cleveland Indians in the American League, 20 games behind the AL champion New York Yankees.

1966 Minnesota Twins season

The 1966 Minnesota Twins finished 89–73, second in the American League. 1,259,374 fans attended Twins games, the second highest total in the American League.

1968 Minnesota Twins season

The 1968 Minnesota Twins season was a season in American baseball. The team finished 79–83, seventh in the American League.

1969 American League Championship Series

The 1969 American League Championship Series was the first ALCS held after Major League Baseball adopted the two-division format that season. It featured the Baltimore Orioles vs. the Minnesota Twins, with the Orioles winning the series 3–0 and advancing to the 1969 World Series, where they would lose to the New York Mets in five games. The Orioles and Twins would meet again the following year, with similar results.

This was the first of three straight appearances in the ALCS for the Orioles.

1972 Minnesota Twins season

The 1972 Minnesota Twins finished 77–77, third in the American League West.

1973 Minnesota Twins season

The 1973 Minnesota Twins finished 81–81, third in the American League West.

1974 Minnesota Twins season

The 1974 Minnesota Twins finished 82–80, third in the American League West.

1978 Minnesota Twins season

The 1978 Minnesota Twins finished 73-89, fourth in the American League West.

1982 Minnesota Twins season

The 1982 Minnesota Twins finished 60-102, seventh in the AL West. It was the first time the Twins lost more than 100 games since moving to Minnesota.

The Twins moved into the Metrodome but only 921,186 fans attended Twins games, the lowest total in the American League.

1983 Minnesota Twins season

The 1983 Minnesota Twins finished 70–92, fifth in the AL West. 858,939 fans attended Twins games, the third-lowest total in the American League.

1985 Minnesota Twins season

The 1985 Minnesota Twins finished with a record of 77-85, tied for fourth in the American League West, and 14 games behind the division winner and eventual World Series champion Kansas City Royals.

2001 Minnesota Twins season

The 2001 Minnesota Twins marked the beginning of the Twins' ascendancy in the American League Central Division. After finishing the 2000 season last in the division with a disappointing 69-93 record, the 2001 team rebounded to finish 85-77, good enough for second place in the division. The six-year run of winning seasons that followed is the longest such stretch in franchise history. In his last year as manager, Tom Kelly continued the development of a core of young players who would win their division the following year.

Third baseman Corey Koskie hit 26 home runs and stole 27 bases, the only Twins player to steal at least 25 bases and hit 25 home runs in the same season.

Dave St. Peter

David St. Peter (born January 3, 1967 in Bismarck, North Dakota) has served as president of the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball since 2002.

St. Peter was born in Bismarck, North Dakota, and attended St. Mary's Central High School in Bismarck and the University of North Dakota. He joined the Twins organization in 1990.

List of Minnesota Twins broadcasters

The Minnesota Twins baseball team have had many broadcasters in their history in Minnesota. Here is a list of the people who have been a part of bringing the Twins to the people of Minnesota.

List of Philadelphia Phillies broadcasters

The following is a list of Philadelphia Phillies broadcasters.

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