Henry Slesar

Henry Slesar (June 12, 1927 – April 2, 2002) was an American author, playwright, and copywriter. He is famous for his use of irony and twist endings. After reading Slesar's "M Is for the Many" in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Alfred Hitchcock bought it for adaptation and they began many successful collaborations. Slesar wrote hundreds of scripts for television series and soap operas, leading TV Guide to call him "the writer with the largest audience in America."[1]

Henry Slesar
BornJune 12, 1927
Brooklyn, New York, United States
DiedApril 2, 2002 (aged 74)
New York City, U.S.
Pen nameO. H. Leslie
Jay Street
NationalityAmerican
GenreDark fantasy
Detective fiction
Science fiction
Mysteries
Thrillers
Fantastic 195703
Slesar's novella "The Goddess of World 21" was cover-featured on the March 1957 issue of Fantastic Science Fiction
Fantastic 195704
The next month, his novelette "Bottle Baby" also took the cover of Fantastic
Super science fiction 195706
Slesar's short story "Desire Woman" was cover-festured on the June 1957 issue of Super-Science Fiction
Fantastic 195707
Slesar's novella "The Secret of Marracott Deep" was the cover story of the July 1957 issue of Fantastic
Fantastic 195803
Slesar's novelette "The Genie Takes a Wife" was cover-featured on the March 1958 issue of Fantastic Stories
Amazing science fiction stories 195805
Slesar's novella "Brother Robot" was cover-featured on the May 1958 issue of Amazing Stories
Fantastic 195805
Slesar's novelette "The Invisible Man Murder Case" took the cover of the May 1958 issue of Fantastic Stories
Amazing science fiction stories 195810
Slesar's "The Delegate from Venus" was the cover story of the October 1958 issue of Amazing Stories
Fantastic 195812
Slesar's novelette "The Eleventh Plague" took the cover of the December 1958 issue of Fantastic
Amazing science fiction stories 195901
Slesar's "The Blonde from Space" was the cover story of the January 1959 issue of Amazing Stories
Amazing stories 196305
Slesar's novella "Jobo" took the cover of the May 1963 issue of Amazing Stories

Life

Henry Slesar was born in Brooklyn, New York City. His parents were Jewish immigrants from Ukraine, and he had two sisters named Doris and Lillian. After graduating from the School of Industrial Art, he found he had a talent for ad copy and design, which launched his twenty-year career as a copywriter at the age of 17.[2] He was hired right out of school to work for the prominent advertising agency Young & Rubicam.[1]

It has been claimed that the term "coffee break" was coined by Slesar and that he was also the person behind McGraw-Hill's massively popular "The Man in the Chair"[3] advertising campaign.[4]

During World War II, for some years[5] he served in the United States Air Force,[6] which influenced his story "The Delegate from Venus".[7] Afterwards, he opened his own agency.

Slesar was married three times: to Oenone Scott, 1953–1969; to Jan Maakestad, 1970–1974; and to Manuela[4] Jone in 1974.[5] He had one daughter and one son.

Pseudonyms

In addition to writing chiefly under his own name, Slesar published under several pseudonyms, particularly on early short stories. These included:

  • Clyde Mitchell – a Ziff Davis "house pseudonym" used by some science fiction and fantasy authors in Amazing Stories and Fantastic, which were edited by Paul W. Fairman. (Authors publishing as Clyde Mitchell include Robert Silverberg, Randall Garrett, Harlan Ellison, and others.) Slesar used the Mitchell name for "The Monster Died at Dawn" in Amazing Stories (November, 1956), and "A Kiss for the Conqueror" in Fantastic (February, 1957).
  • O. H. Leslie – Slesar chose this name, which he used from 1956 to 1964, again for Paul Fairman as well as other magazines.
In Amazing Stories he published such stories as "Marriages Are Made in Detroit" (December 1956), "Reluctant Genius"[8] (January 1957), "No Room in Heaven" (June 1957), and "The Anonymous Man" (July 1957), "The Seven Eyes of Jonathan Dark" (January 1959).
In Fantastic he published such stories as "Death Rattle" (December 1956), "My Robot" (February 1957), "Abe Lincoln—Android" (April 1957), "The Marriage Machine" (July 1957), and "Inheritance" (August 1957).
  • Ivar Jorgensen – This pseudonym, a house name, was also used by Robert Silverberg, Randall Garrett, Harlan Ellison, Howard Browne, and Paul Fairman himself. Slesar's use of the name appeared in Fantastic for "Coward's Death" (December 1956) and "Tailor-Made Killers" (August 1957).
  • E. K. Jarvis – another Ziff Davis house name, also used by Robert Silverberg, Harlan Ellison, Paul W. Fairman, Robert Bloch, and Robert Moore Williams. Slesar used it for "Get Out of Our Skies!"[9] in Amazing Stories (December 1957).
  • Lawrence Chandler – Another Ziff Davis house name, shared by Howard Browne, Slesar used it for "Tool of the Gods" in Fantastic (November 1957).
  • Sley Harson – Nearly an anagram of Slesar's name, he used it in collaboration with his friend Harlan Ellison. Together they published "Sob Story" in The Deadly Streets (Ace Books, 1958).
  • Gerald Vance – Another Ziff Davis house name; shared by William P. McGivern, Rog Phillips, Robert Silverberg and Randall Garrett. Slesar sold the story "The Lavender Talent" to Paul Fairman at Fantastic (March 1958).
  • Jeff Heller – A pen name he used when collaborating with his friend, M*A*S*H writer Jay Folb.[1]
  • Eli Jerome - A pen name derived from the first names of his two brothers-in-law, the husbands of his sister Doris Greenberg and his sister Lillian Gleich. Used in stories in Alfred Hitchcock collections and 2 teleplays on Alfred Hitchcock Presents ("Party Line" and "One Grave Too Many", both 1960).

Other house names Slesar employed were Jay Street, John Murray, and Lee Saber.

After 1958, he wrote chiefly under his own name.

Career

In 1955, he published his first short story, "The Brat" (Imaginative Tales, September, 1955). While working as a copywriter, he published hundreds of short stories—over forty in 1957 alone—including detective fiction, science fiction, criminal stories, mysteries, and thrillers in such publications as Playboy, Imaginative Tales, and Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine; he was writing, on average, a story per week.[1] Alfred Hitchcock hired him to write a number of the scenarios for Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

He wrote a series of stories about a criminal named Ruby Martinson for Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine—"The First Crime of Ruby Martinson" (September, 1957), "Ruby Martinson, Ex-Con" (June, 1958), "Ruby Martinson, Cat Burglar" (June, 1959), "Ruby Martinson’s Great Fur Robbery" (May, 1962)—and later worked on Rod Serling's Twilight Zone series. He also penned the screenplay for the 1965 film Two on a Guillotine, which was based on one of his stories. His short story "Examination Day" was used in the 1980s Twilight Zone revival.

His first novel-length work was 20 Million Miles to Earth, a 1957 novelization of the film. In 1960, his first novel, The Gray Flannel Shroud (1958), a murder mystery set in an advertising agency, earned the Edgar Allan Poe Award.

In 1974, he won an Emmy Award as the head writer for CBS Daytime's The Edge of Night. His term as head writer (1968–84) was considered lengthy.[10] Chris Schemering writes in The Soap Opera Encyclopedia, "Slesar proved a master of the serial format, creating a series of bizarre, intricate plots of offbeat characters in the spirit of the irreverent detective movies of the '40s."[2] During that time, he was also head writer for the Procter & Gamble soap operas Somerset (on NBC Daytime) and Search for Tomorrow until John William Corrington replaced him on the latter. During the 1974–75 television season, he was the creator and head writer for Executive Suite, a CBS primetime series.

He wrote mainly science-fiction scripts for the CBS Radio Mystery Theater during the 1970s.[11]

In 1983, Procter & Gamble wanted to replace him as the head writer for The Edge of Night, but ABC/ABC Daytime kept him. After his eventual replacement as head writer by Lee Sheldon, the network named him and Sam Hall the new head writers of its soap opera One Life to Live, but he left that show after only one year. He was later the head writer of the CBS Daytime series Capitol.

His last novel was Murder at Heartbreak Hospital (ISBN 0-897-33463-9). It is based on his experiences as a writer for soaps. A homicide detective investigates murders on the set of a soap opera and meets a variety of amusing characters, including the bland leading man, a rapacious starlet, a couple of gay teleplay writers, and some executives. As so many of his works did, it features a twist ending. It was originally published in Europe in 1990[12] and the American version retains British spellings and some errors (possibly Slesar's, as when the detective's name is wrongly given in chapter three). The novel was adapted into a film, Heartbreak Hospital, by Ruedi Gerber in 2002; it starred John Shea as Milo, the leading man, Diane Venora as his wife, and Patricia Clarkson as Lottie.[13]

Other late works included "interactive mystery serial" stories for MysteryNet.com, which invited readers to contribute their ideas.

Novels

  • The Gray Flannel Shroud. New York: Random House, 1959. (Series: A Random House mystery)
  • Enter Murderers. New York: Random House, 1960. (Series: A Random House mystery)
  • The Bridge of Lions. New York: Macmillan, 1963.
  • The Thing at the Door. New York: Random House, 1974. (ISBN 0-394-49007-X)
  • Murder at Heartbreak Hospital. Chicago, Ill.: Academy Chicago Publishers, 1998.

Plays

  • The Veil. Studio City, CA: Players Press, 1997. (ISBN 0887342612)

Teleplays

Most of the teleplays written for Alfred Hitchcock Presents were based on Slesar's own stories.

  • "A Crime for Mothers", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, January 24, 1961 (Season 6, Episode 16), starring Claire Trevor and Patricia Smith.
  • "A Woman's Help", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, March 28, 1961 (Season 6, Episode 24), starring Antoinette Bower.
  • "Blood Bargain", for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, October 25, 1963 (Season 2, Episode 5), starring Richard Kiley.
  • "Burglar Proof", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, February 27, 1962 (Season 7, Episode 21), starring Paul Hartman.
  • "Cop for a Day", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, October 31, 1961 (Season 7, Episode 4), starring Walter Matthau and Glenn Cannon.
  • "Final Vow" for, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, October 25, 1962 (Season 1, Episode 6), starring Carol Lynley.
  • "I Saw the Whole Thing", for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, October 11, 1962 (Season 1, Episode 4), starring John Forsythe.
  • "Laurie Marie", for The Name of the Game, December 19, 1969 (Season 2, Episode 13); teleplay written with David P. Harmon.
  • "Ma Parker", for Batman, October 6, 1966 (Season 2, Episode 10).
  • "Most Likely to Succeed", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, May 8, 1962 (Season 7, Episode 31).
  • "The Greatest Mother of Them All", for Batman, October 5, 1966 (Season 2, Episode 9).
  • "The Horse Player", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, March 14, 1961 (Season 6, Episode 22), starring Claude Rains.
  • "The Last Escape", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, January 31, 1961 (Season 6, Episode 17), starring Keenan Wynn and Jan Sterling.
  • "The Last Remains", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, March 27, 1962 (Season 7, Episode 25), starring John Fiedler.
  • "The Man in the Mirror", for 77 Sunset Strip, January 13, 1961 (Season 3, Episode 18).
  • "The Man with Two Faces", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, December 13, 1960 (Season 6, Episode 11), starring Spring Byington.
  • "The Old Man in the Cave", based on his 1962 story "The Old Man," for Twilight Zone, November 8, 1963 (Season 5, Episode 7); teleplay written by Rod Serling.
  • "The Test", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, February 20, 1962 (Season 7, Episode 20), starring Brian Keith and Rod Lauren.
  • "The Throwback", for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, February 28, 1961 (Season 6, Episode 20), starring Murray Matheson.

Short stories

Much of Slesar's short fiction appears in collections and anthologies. He collaborated a few times with Harlan Ellison. His collections are:

  • Clean Crimes and Neat Murders: Alfred Hitchcock's Hand Picked Selection of Stories by Henry Slesar. Introduction by Alfred Hitchcock. New York: Avon, 1960.
Cover title: A Bouquet of Clean Crimes and Neat Murders.
Spine title: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Clean Crimes and Neat Murders.
  • A Crime for Mothers and Others. New York, N.Y.: Avon, 1962.
  • Murders Most Macabre. New York, N.Y.: Avon, 1986. (paperback; ISBN 0-380-89975-2)
  • Death on Television: The Best of Henry Slesar's Alfred Hitchcock Stories. Edited by Francis M. Nevins, Jr. and Martin H. Greenberg. Introduction by Henry Slesar. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1989. (ISBN 0-809-31500-9)

Many stories were later made available as downloadable and online audio versions, such as 1957's "Dream Town"[14] and "Heart."[15]

Selected short stories

  • "A Cry from the Penthouse" (1959) – Originally published in Playboy, November, 1959. Anthologized in: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Stories for Late at Night, 1961 and AHP: More Stories for Late at Night, 1962.
  • "A God Named Smith" (1957) – Originally published in Amazing Stories, July, 1957. Later collected with Worlds of the Imperium, by Keith Laumer, as Armchair Fiction Double Novel #51, 2012, ISBN 978-1-61287-078-6.
  • "Abe Lincoln – Android" (1957) – As by O. H. Leslie. Originally published in Fantastic, April, 1957. Anthologized in: Great Science Fiction, No. 6, 1967.
  • "Bats" (1989) – The Further Adventures of Batman, 1989, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 0-553-28270-0.
  • "Before the Talent Dies" (1957) – Originally published in Venture Science Fiction, September, 1957. Anthologized in: No Limits, 1964, ed. Joseph W. Ferman; and in Supermen, 1984, ed. Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg, Charles G. Waugh, ISBN 0-451-13201-7.
  • "Behind the Screen" (1993) – The Further Adventures of Wonder Woman, 1993, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 0-553-28624-2.
  • "Brother Robot" (1958) – Originally published in Amazing Science Fiction Stories, May, 1958. Anthologized in: Uncollected Stars, 1986, ed. Piers Anthony, Barry N. Malzberg, Martin H. Greenberg, Charles G. Waugh, ISBN 0-380-89596-X; and in Robots, 1989, ed. Charles G. Waugh, Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 0-451-15926-8.
  • "Chief" (1960) – The 6th Annual of the Year's Best S-F, 1961, ed. Judith Merril; 100 Great Science Fiction Short Short Stories, 1980, ed. Isaac Asimov, Martin Greenberg, Joseph D. Olander, ISBN 0-380-50773-0; and others.
  • "Cop for a Day" (1957) – Originally published in Manhunt, January 1957. Anthologized in: The Young Oxford Book of Nasty Endings, 1997, ed. Dennis Pepper, ISBN 0-19-278151-0.
  • "Ersatz" (1967) – Dangerous Visions, 1967, ed. Harlan Ellison.
  • "Examination Day" (1958) – Originally published in Playboy, February 1958. Frequently anthologized; some include School and Society Through Science Fiction, 1974, ed. Patricia Warrick, Martin H. Greenberg, Joseph D. Olander, ISBN 0-528-61240-9; Inside Information: Computers in Fiction, edited by Abbe Mowshowitz; Beyond Time and Space, 1978, ed. Robert R. Potter, ISBN 0-87065-155-2; Realms of Darkness, 1985, ed. Mary Danby, ISBN 0-86273-244-1; New Stories from the Twilight Zone, 1993, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 0-7515-0329-0; 100 Hair Raising Little Horror Stories, 1993, ed. Al Sarrantonio, Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 1-56619-056-8; and Beware!: R. L. Stine Picks His Favorite Scary Stories, 2002, ed. R. L. Stine, ISBN 0-06-623842-0.
  • "40 Detectives Later" – in 100 Menacing Little Murder Stories, 1998, ed. Robert Weinberg, Stefan Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 0-7607-0854-1.
  • "I Now Pronounce You Superman and Wife" (1993) The Further Adventures of Superman, 1993, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 0-553-28568-8.
  • "Job Offer" (1959) – Originally published in Satellite Science Fiction, April, 1959. Anthologized in: 101 Science Fiction Stories, 1986, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, Charles G. Waugh, Jenny-Lynn Waugh, ISBN 0-517-60669-0.
  • "Legacy of Terror" (1958) – Originally published in Amazing Science Fiction Stories, November, 1958. Anthologized in: Satan's Pets, 1972, ed. Vic Ghidalia.
  • "Lost Dog" (1958) – Originally published in Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine, February, 1958. Anthologized in: Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Stories My Mother Never Told Me, 1963, ed. Alfred Hitchcock.
  • "Murder Delayed" (1962) – Games Killers Play, 1968, ed. Alfred Hitchcock.
  • "My Father, The Cat" (1957) – Originally published in Fantastic Universe, December, 1957. Anthologized in: Supernatural Cats, 1972, ed. Claire Necker, ISBN 0-385-07561-8; in Magicats!, 1984, ed. Jack Dann, Gardner Dozois, ISBN 0-441-51530-4; and in Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy: Faeries, edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg, and Charles G. Waugh. New York: Roc, 1991. (ISBN 0-451-45061-2); and others.
  • "My Mother the Ghost" (1965) – Originally published in The Diners Club Magazine, 1965. Anthologized in: Tricks and Treats, 1976, ed. Joe Gores, Bill Pronzini, ISBN 0-385-11416-8.
  • "Personal Interview" (1957) – Originally published in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine Including Black Mask Magazine, December 1957.
  • "Prez" (1982) – Terrors, 1982, ed. Charles L. Grant, ISBN 0-86721-138-5.
  • "Speak" (1965) – First published in The Diners Club Magazine, 1965. Anthologized in: Microcosmic Tales; Weird Tales, 1996, ed. Marvin Kaye, Saralee Kaye, ISBN 0-7607-0118-0.
  • "The Candidate" (1961) – Originally published in Rogue, 1961. Anthologized in: The Fiend in You,[16] 1962, ed. Charles Beaumont; Alfred Hitchcock Presents: Stories That Scared Even Me, 1967, ed. Alfred Hitchcock, ISBN 0-370-00643-7; The Arbor House Necropolis, 1981, Bill Pronzini, ISBN 0-87795-338-4; Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy # 4: Spells, 1985, ed. Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg, Charles G. Waugh, ISBN 0-451-13578-4; The Young Oxford Book of Nasty Endings, 1997, ed. Dennis Pepper, ISBN 0-19-278151-0; and others.
  • "The Fifty-third Card" (1990) – The Further Adventures of The Joker, 1990, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 0-553-28531-9.
  • "The Girl Who Found Things" (1973) – Originally published in Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, July 1973. Anthologized in: Alfred Hitchcock's Fatal Attractions, 1983, ed. Elana Lore, ISBN 0-385-27914-0, and in Tales of the Occult, (989, ed. Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg, Charles G. Waugh, ISBN 0-87975-506-7.
  • "The Goddess of World 21" (1957) – Originally published in Fantastic, March, 1957. Later in The Most Thrilling Science Fiction Ever Told No. 11, Winter 1968.
  • "The Haunted Man" (1974) – Twisters, (981, ed. Steve Bowles, ISBN 0-00-671798-5.
  • "The Invisible Man Murder Case" (1958) – Originally published in Fantastic, May 1958. Anthologized in: Invisible Men, 1960, ed. Basil Davenport; and in The Seven Deadly Sins of Science Fiction, 1981, ed. Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg, Charles G. Waugh.
  • "The Jam" (1958) – Originally published in Playboy, November, 1958. Frequently anthologized; some include Something Strange, 1969, ed. Marjorie B. Smiley, Mary Delores Jarmon, Domenica Paterno; The Supernatural In Fiction, 1973, ed. Leo P. Kelley, ISBN 0-07-033497-8; The Arbor House Treasury of Horror and the Supernatural, 1981, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, Bill Pronzini, Barry N. Malzberg, ISBN 0-87795-349-X; Classic Tales of Horror and the Supernatural, 1991, ed. Barry N. Malzberg, Martin H. Greenberg, Bill Pronzini, ISBN 0-688-10963-2; and others.
  • "The Knocking in the Castle" (1964) – Originally published in Fantastic Stories of Imagination, November, 1964. Anthologized in: The Hell of Mirrors, 1965, ed. Peter Haining.
  • "The Mad Killer" (1957) – Originally published in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine Including Black Mask Magazine, June 1957.
  • "The Movie-Makers" (1956) – Originally published in Fantastic Universe, July, 1956. Anthologized in: Hollywood Unreel, 1982, ed. Charles Waugh, Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 0-8008-3197-7.
  • "The Moving Finger Types" (1968) – Originally published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, September, 1968. Anthologized in: Don't Open This Book!, 1998, ed. Marvin Kaye, ISBN 1-56865-524-X.
  • "The Old Man" (1962) – Microcosmic Tales, 1980, ed. Joseph D. Olander, Martin H. Greenberg, Isaac Asimov, ISBN 0-8008-5238-9; The Twilight Zone: The Original Stories, 1985, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, Richard Matheson, Charles G. Waugh, ISBN 1-56731-065-6.
  • "The Phantom of the Soap Opera" (1989) – Phantoms, 1989, ed. Rosalind M. Greenberg, Martin H. Greenberg, (DAW Collectors #778), ISBN 0-88677-348-2.
  • "The Return of the Moresbys" (1964) – Haunted America: Star-Spangled Supernatural Stories, 1991, ed. Marvin Kaye.
  • "The Right Kind of House" (1957) – Originally published in Haunted Houses: The Greatest Stories, 1997, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 1-56731-168-7. Anthologized in: 100 Menacing Little Murder Stories, 1998, ed. Robert Weinberg, Stefan Dziemianowicz, Martin H. Greenberg, ISBN 0-7607-0854-1.
  • "The Secret Formula" (1957) – Originally published in Playboy, October, 1957.
  • "The Secret of Marracott Deep" (1957) – Originally published in Fantastic, July, 1957. Later collected with Pawn of the Black Fleet, by Mark Clifton, as Armchair Fiction Double Novel #9, 2011, ISBN 978-1-61287-008-3.
  • "The Self-Improvement of Salvadore Ross" (1961) – Originally published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, May, 1961. Anthologized in: The Twilight Zone: The Original Stories, 1985, ed. Martin H. Greenberg, Richard Matheson, Charles G. Waugh, ISBN 1-56731-065-6.
  • "The Show Must Go On" (1957) – Originally published in Infinity Science Fiction, July 1957. Later anthologized in Science Fiction Gems, Volume One, 2011, (Armchair Fiction Gems #1), ISBN 978-1-61287-028-1.
  • "The Stuff" (1961) — Originally published in Galaxy Science Fiction, August 1961.
  • "The Success Machine" (1957) – Originally published in Amazing Stories, September, 1957. Later appeared in Science Fiction Greats, Winter 1969, and in Fantastic, July, 1979.
  • "Victory Parade" (1957) – Originally published in Playboy, April, 1957. Anthologized in: Science Fiction, 1975, ed. Sylvia Z. Brodkin, Elizabeth J. Pearson, ISBN 0-688-41723-X.
  • "Who Am I?" (1956) – Originally published in Super-Science Fiction, December, 1956. Anthologized in: Tales from Super-Science Fiction, 2012, ed. Robert Silverberg, ISBN 978-1-893887-48-0.
  • "Whosit's Disease" (1962) – Originally published in Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, October, 1962. Anthologized in: Beyond the Curtain of Dark, 1972, ed. Peter Haining, ISBN 0-450-01297-2.

Selected adaptations

Awards and nominations

In 1960, he was awarded the Edgar Award for Best First Novel.

Death

In 2002, he died of complications due to minor elective surgery.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Other Obituaries: Henry Slesar". Locus. Oakland, California: Charles N. Brown. 48 (496, number 5): 69. May 2002. ISSN 0047-4959.
  2. ^ a b Schemering, Chris (1988). The Soap Opera Encyclopedia. Ballantine Books. p. 283.
  3. ^ Lucy, Jim (July 1, 2003). "The Man in the Chair Lives". Electrical Wholesaling. Retrieved September 6, 2012.
  4. ^ a b Hobbs, John (Apr 15, 2002). "Obituary: Henry Slesar". Variety. Retrieved September 5, 2012.
  5. ^ a b "Detectionary" (PDF). Detectionary. Retrieved September 5, 2012. Militaire dienst: US Army, 1946–1947.
  6. ^ "Henry Slesar". Detective-Fiction.com. Retrieved September 6, 2012.
  7. ^ Slesar, Henry (April 17, 2008). "The Delegate from Venus [full text]". Project Gutenberg. Retrieved September 5, 2012.
  8. ^ Slesar, Henry (February 9, 2009). "Reluctant Genius [full text]". Project Gutenberg. Retrieved September 5, 2012.
  9. ^ Slesar, Henry (October 6, 2008). "Get Out of Our Skies! [full text]". Project Gutenberg. Retrieved September 5, 2012.
  10. ^ Schemering, Chris (1988). The Soap Opera Encyclopedia. Ballantine Books. p. 92. In 1968 veteran mystery writer Henry Slesar became headwriter, beginning a writing stint of fifteen years, the longest in the history of daytime drama.
  11. ^ "Free Audio SF – CBS Radio Mystery Theater". Hard SF. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved February 10, 2011.
  12. ^ "Murder at Heartbreak Hospital". Kirkus Reviews. November 15, 1998. Retrieved September 4, 2012. This first US publication for a novel Slesar (The Thing at the Door, 1974, etc.) originally published in Europe in 1990 finds the veteran storyteller, whose TV credits go back to Alfred Hitchcock Presents, plotting murder in the world he used to work in, the hothouse universe of the soap opera.
  13. ^ "Heartbreak Hospital". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved September 6, 2012.
  14. ^ Slesar, Henry (January 1957). "Dream Town". Project Gutenberg EBook. Retrieved September 5, 2012.
  15. ^ Slesar, Henry (January 1957). "Heart". Project Gutenberg EBook. Retrieved September 5, 2012.
  16. ^ "The Fiend in You (1962), An anthology of stories edited by Charles Beaumont". Fantastic Fiction website. Retrieved September 4, 2012.
  17. ^ "Terror from the Year 5000". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved September 4, 2012.

External links

1st Daytime Emmy Awards

The 1st Daytime Emmy Awards were held on May 28, 1974, to commemorate excellence in daytime programming from the previous year (1973). It was hosted by Barbara Walters and Peter Marshall at the Rockefeller Plaza in New York City and televised on NBC. They were introduced to the stage by game and variety show host Garry Moore.Winners in each category are in bold.

2000X

2000X is a dramatic anthology series released by National Public Radio and produced by the Hollywood Theater of the Ear. There were 49 plays of various lengths in 26 one-hour programs broadcast weekly and later released on the Internet. Plays were adaptations of futuristic stories, novels and plays by noted authors. Producer/director Yuri Rasovsky and host/consultant Harlan Ellison won the 2001 Bradbury Award from the Science Fiction Writers of America for their work on this program.

7th Daytime Emmy Awards

The 7th Daytime Emmy Awards were held in 1980 to commemorate excellence in daytime programming from the previous year (1979). The seventh awards included a cameo appearance category, giving an award to a memorable soap cameo. Six awards were given.

Winners in each category are in bold.

Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine

Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine (AHMM) is a monthly digest size fiction magazine specializing in crime and detective fiction. AHMM is named for Alfred Hitchcock, the famed director of suspense films and television.

Examination Day

"Examination Day" is the first segment of the sixth episode from the first season (1985–86) of the television series The Twilight Zone. The segment is based on the short story "Examination Day" by Henry Slesar.

Jay Street

Jay Street may refer to:

TransportationJay Street – MetroTech (New York City Subway), a New York City Subway station complex at Jay, Lawrence and Willoughby Streets in Brooklyn consisting of:

Jay Street – MetroTech (IND Fulton Street Line); serving the A and ​C trains

Jay Street – MetroTech (IND Culver Line); serving the F train

Jay Street – MetroTech (BMT Fourth Avenue Line); serving the N, R, and ​W trains

Bridge–Jay Streets (BMT Myrtle Avenue Line), a demolished New York City Subway elevated stationPeopleJay Street, a pen name of Henry Slesar

Knave (magazine)

Knave magazine is a long-established British pornographic magazine, published by Galaxy Publications. Originally launched in 1968, it is the upmarket sister publication of Fiesta magazine. Mary Millington modelled for the magazine in 1974, prior to her exclusive signing to work for David Sullivan's magazines.Along with many other adult magazines, Knave has published the works of popular authors, including Harlan Ellison. Ellison's short story "The Pied Piper of Sex" was first published in the March 1959 issue under the name Paul Merchant, whilst "The Man with the Green Nose", also known as "Survivor No. 1", and co-written with Henry Slesar, first appeared in the September 1959 issue. Other people to have been published at Knave include Kim Newman, Dave Langford, and Neil Gaiman. Gaiman's early short stories, including "We Can Get Them For You Wholesale", were published within the magazine; he also worked at the magazine in many roles, including celebrity interviewer and book reviewer. Gaiman began work at the magazine in 1984 but left in the late 80s because an editorial change resulted in the magazine concentrating more heavily on pornographic content.Eric Fuller, credited by The Guardian as "the man behind the success of Dennis Publishing's lad-mag, Maxim", also worked for the magazine for a time.

List of Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1985 TV series) episodes

The following is a list of episodes from the 1985–89 television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents, which was a revival of the original 1955–62 series of the same name. The new series lasted only one season on NBC. NBC cancelled it, but it was then produced for three more years by USA Network.

List of Alfred Hitchcock Presents episodes

The following is a list of episodes from the television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

List of One Life to Live crew

The following is a list of writers, producers and directors who have worked on the American soap opera One Life to Live.

Lois Kibbee

Lois Kibbee (July 13, 1922 – October 18, 1993) was an American actress.

Kibbee was born in Wheeling, West Virginia. The daughter of actor Milton Kibbee and the niece of actor Guy Kibbee, Kibbee played in a number of television and film roles.

On TV, Kibbee's most notable roles were on daytime soap operas. She had a long run as wealthy Geraldine Weldon Whitney Saxon on the CBS/ABC daytime soap opera The Edge of Night, where she appeared from 1970–71 and again from 1973 until the show's end in 1984. She also portrayed frosty matriarch Emily Moore Matson on NBC's Somerset from 1972–73, a character whose eccentric family was involved in a murder storyline centered on "Jingles the Clown". Later in her career she played powerful matriarch Elizabeth Sanders on ABC's One Life to Live (from 1986–88 and again in 1989).

In film, Kibbee may be best remembered for her role in the film Caddyshack as Mrs. Smails. Her character was involved in several of the film's jokes, including a scene where a candy bar in a swimming pool is mistakenly identified as human feces.

Kibbee died of a brain tumor on October 18, 1993, in New York City, New York.

One of Our Spies Is Missing

One of Our Spies Is Missing is the 1966 feature-length film version of The Man from U.N.C.L.E.'s second season two-part episode "The Bridge of Lions Affair". The episodes were originally broadcast in the United States on February 4, 1966 and February 11, 1966 on NBC. The film is directed by E. Darrell Hallenbeck and written by Howard Rodman. It, as does the television series, stars Robert Vaughn and David McCallum. It is the fourth such feature film that used as its basis a reedited version of one or more episodes from the series. However, this film, and the episodes it draws from, represents the only instance where a Man from U.N.C.L.E. story is derived from an existing novel: The Bridge of Lions (1963) by Henry Slesar.

Peggy O'Shea

Mary Margaret "Peggy" O'Shea (October 3, 1922 – May 1, 2014) was an American screenwriter for soap operas.

Born in Niagara Falls, New York, she began writing for television with her former husband Lou Shaw for such series as Dr. Kildare, Ben Casey, and Have Gun – Will Travel. She would later serve as head writer for One Life to Live from 1979 to 1983, Capitol from 1983 to 1984, and again for OLTL from 1984 to 1987. She also wrote for Peyton Place. She won a Writers Guild of America Award and a Daytime Emmy Award for her work on OLTL. She was also nominated for a total of four WGA Awards and five Daytime Emmys.While writing for OLTL, O'Shea lived in New York City, but she would move to live in Los Angeles. On May 1, 2014, she died of complications from a stroke. She was 91. She was survived by a son from her marriage to Shaw.

Sam Hall (writer)

Allison Samuel Hall (March 11, 1921 – September 26, 2014), known as Sam Hall, was a screenwriter known for his work in daytime soap operas, particularly Dark Shadows (from 1967 to 1971) and One Life to Live (from 1978 to 1984).

Terror from the Year 5000

Terror from the Year 5000 (also known as Cage of Doom in the UK) is a 1958 independently made American black-and-white science fiction film, produced by Robert J. Gurney Jr., Samuel Z. Arkoff, James H. Nicholson, and Gene Searchinger, directed by Robert J. Gurney Jr., and starring Ward Costello, Joyce Holden, John Stratton, Salome Jens, and Fred Herrick. The screenplay is based (uncredited) on the short story "Bottle Baby" by print/TV/film writer Henry Slesar, that was published in the science fiction magazine Fantastic (April 1957). American International Pictures released the film on a double bill with either The Screaming Skull or The Brain Eaters.

The Deadly Streets

The Deadly Streets is a collection of short stories published by author Harlan Ellison in 1958.

The stories explore the violent themes Ellison experienced as part of the street gang The Barons when he was researching Web of the City.

The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series, season 5)

The fifth and final season of The Twilight Zone aired Fridays at 9:30–10:00 pm (EST) on CBS from September 27, 1963 to June 19, 1964. It featured the same intro as the fourth season, but reverted to the original half-hour format. A color version of the opening was later used for Twilight Zone: The Movie.

Two on a Guillotine

Two on a Guillotine is a 1965 American horror film produced and directed by William Conrad and starring Connie Stevens. The screenplay by John Kneubuhl and Henry Slesar is based on a story by Slesar.It was the first in a series of low budget suspense dramas for Warner Bros, the others being My Blood Runs Cold and Brainstorm.(There was meant to be a fourth, The Thing at the Door, but it ended up not being made). These were inspired by the success of William Castle films.

Uncollected Stars

Uncollected Stars is an anthology of 16 science fiction themed short stories collected from other publications. It was published in 1986.

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