Henry J. McGlew

Henry J. "Fuzzy" McGlew of Chelsea, Massachusetts was a quarterback and head coach of the Notre Dame college football program.

In his two years as a starting quarterback from 1901 to 1902, the team achieved a combined record of 14–3–2. His best game came against the American College of Medicine and Surgery in 1902, when he made runs of 80, 65 and 40 yards and scored one touchdown. In 1903, he moved to left end, and helped the team to achieve their first undefeated season. McGlew never once fumbled the ball during his playing career.

McGlew was a teammate of College Football Hall of Famer Red Salmon, and succeeded him as head coach of the Irish in 1905. His lone season as coach included a record-setting 142–0 victory over American Medical, but the team finished a disappointing 5–4, and McGlew retired from the coaching ranks.

Henry J. McGlew
Biographical details
BornSeptember 26, 1879
Navan, Meath, Ireland
Playing career
1901–1903Notre Dame
Position(s)Quarterback, end
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1905Notre Dame
Head coaching record
Overall5–4

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Notre Dame (Independent) (1905)
1905 Notre Dame 5–4
Notre Dame: 5–4
Total: 5–4

References

  • Steele, Michael R. The Fighting Irish Football Encyclopedia. Champaign, IL: Sports Publishing LLC (1996). p. 25-26, 406
  • "Henry J. McGlew Records by Year". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved 2007-12-01.
1901 Notre Dame football team

The 1901 Notre Dame football team was an American football team that represented the University of Notre Dame in the 1901 college football season. In its second season with Pat O'Dea as coach, the team compiled an 8–1–1 record, shut out six opponents, and outscored all opponents by a total of 145 to 19. Al Fortin was the team captain.With victories over Purdue and Indiana, Notre Dame was declared to be the Indiana state champion. Only four of the games played were deemed "championship games": Northwestern, Beloit, Indiana, and Purdue.Fullback Louis J. Salmon starred on the 1901 team. At a post-season meeting on November 29, 1901, Salmon was unanimously elected as captain of the 1902 Notre Dame football team. At the same meeting, varsity letters were presented to 14 players for their participation on the 1901 team: Lonergan, Lins and Nyere, ends; Faragher and Fortin, tackles; Gillen, Winters, Piele, O'Malley, guards; Pick, center; Henry J. McGlew, quarterback; Doran and Kirby, halfbacks; and Salmon, fullback.

1905 Notre Dame football team

The 1905 Notre Dame football team was an American football team that represented the University of Notre Dame in the 1905 college football season. In its first season with Henry J. McGlew as coach, the team compiled a 5–4 record and outscored its opponents by a combined total of 312 to 80.

The Wabash Little Giants traveled to South Bend on October 21 that year, and defeated Notre Dame 5–0. The upset is the Fighting Irish's only home-field loss in 125 games between 1899 and 1928. The very next game, Notre Dame scored its most points ever against American Medical, winning 142 to 0.

Bob Davie (American football)

Robert Edwin Davie Jr. (born September 30, 1954) is an American football college coach and former player, currently the head football coach at New Mexico. He previously served as the head football coach at Notre Dame from 1997 to 2001, compiling a record of 35–25. He also served as an ESPN college football color commentator from 2002 to 2011.

Edward McKeever

Edward Clark Timothy McKeever (August 25, 1910 – September 13, 1974) was an American football player, coach, and executive. He served as the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame (1944) and Cornell University (1945–1946) and the University of San Francisco (1947), compiling a career college football record of 25–12–1. From 1960 to 1961, McKeever was the general manager of the American Football League's Boston Patriots

A native of Texas, McKeever originally attended Notre Dame in 1930 and 1931 and transferred to Texas Tech University, where he played football from 1932 to 1934. He launched his coaching career in 1935 as backfield coach at Texas Tech, where he remained through 1938. In 1939 and 1940, McKeever was on Frank Leahy's staff at Boston College. He came to Notre Dame along with Leahy in 1941 and served as an assistant through 1943, and was named interim head coach in 1944 when Leahy entered the United States Navy. McKeever gained a spot in the Notre Dame record books by presiding over the worst defeat in school history, a 59–0 rout by Army. in 1945, McKeever moved on to Cornell as head coach, where he remained for two seasons. In 1947, he became head coach at the University of San Francisco and the following season served as head coach of the Chicago Rockets of the All-America Football Conference. In 1949, he joined the staff at Louisiana State University and in 1960 became general manager of the Boston Patriots.

McKeever died on September 13, 1974.

Frank E. Hering

Frank Earl Hering (April 30, 1874 – July 11, 1943) was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame from 1896 to 1898, compiling a record of 12–6–1. Hering was also the first basketball coach at Notre Dame, coaching one season in 1897–1898, and helmed the school's baseball team for three seasons from 1897 to 1899.

Hering was born in Sunbury, Pennsylvania and played quarterback for the Chicago Maroons in 1893 and 1894. His first head coaching job was with the Bucknell Bison in 1895. The next year, he arrived at Notre Dame to play quarterback for the football team; but by 1898 he had taken on the additional responsibility of directing the entire athletic department, including coaching the football and baseball teams, and introducing basketball to the university. He earned the title of "Father of Notre Dame Football" for his success in expanding the football program from an intramural activity to a full-fledged intercollegiate sport. Hering officially dedicated the new Notre Dame Stadium in 1930.

Hering is also recognized by the Fraternal Order of Eagles as the "Father of Mother's Day" for his work in promoting the establishment of a national holiday, having given public speeches supporting the idea as early as 1904. Hering was a member of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity.While a member of the Notre Dame faculty in his later years, Hering was known for his outreach programs in South Bend, Indiana, including the establishment of "Hering House"—a civic center for the African-American community.

H. G. Hadden

Harry Graydon Hadden (August 30, 1874 – October 13, 1945) was an American football player and coach. Hadden was born in 1874 and raised in the Englewood section of Chicago. He graduated from the University of Michigan Law Department with an LLB degree in 1895. While attending law school, Hadden played tackle for the 1894 Michigan Wolverines football team. Following a tour with the Chicago Athletic Club, he transferred to Notre Dame, where he not only coached the football team in 1895, but also inserted himself into the lineup during a loss to Indianapolis Artillery. He served as the head coach at the University of Notre Dame in 1895, tallying a mark of 3–1. He returned to Michigan as an assistant coach in 1899. In 1902, he was employed by the Knickerbocker Ice Company in Chicago. As of 1912, he was employed as a sales agent in Kenilworth, Illinois. At the time of his registration for the draft in 1918, Hadden was living and working in Washington, D.C., as Assistant Supervisor of the U.S. Shipping Board, Emergency Fleet Corp. He suffered burns on his face and hands in a fire at a two-story building in Washington, D.C., in November 1918. As of 1941, he was retired and living in New York City.

James Farragher

James Francis Farragher (September 10, 1873 – February 22, 1949) was an American football player and coach. He played left tackle at the University of Notre Dame in the early 1900s. He is often identified in official university histories as the team's head coach for the 1902–1903 season. This claim remains controversial among sports historians, some of whom assign this honor to Farragher's teammate, All-American Louis "Red" Salmon, who served as team captain during the 1902–1903 season. Both men are routinely credited as acting coaches in official histories of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team.

James L. Morison

James L. D. Morison was an American football coach. He served as the first part-time head coach at the University of Notre Dame and Hillsdale College in 1894, tallying a mark of 1–1–1.

Notre Dame took a significant step toward respectability, prominence, and stability when they hired a part-time coach, bearded James L. Morison. He wrote an acquaintance after his first day on the job: "I arrived here [Notre Dame] this morning and found about as green a set of football players that ever donned a uniform…They want to smoke, and when I told them that they would have to run and get up some wind, they thought I was rubbing it in on them. "One big, strong cuss remarked that it was too much like work. Well, maybe you think I didn't give him hell! I bet you a hundred no one ever makes a remark like that again." ... Morrison had been hired for $40 plus expenses for two weeks.Morison had once played tackle for the University of Michigan. He stressed conditioning, speed, and an abundance of end runs and convinced his players that conditioning and speed would lead them to victory. Such tactics led to an opening 14–0 win over Hillsdale. Next came Albion, fresh from a 26–12 loss to Michigan, who proved to be tough. The game ended in a 6–6 tie when substitute fullback John Studebaker fell on a fumble for the only Fighting Irish touchdown.

At the conclusion of the two-week contract Morrison left campus to take the head coaching job at Hillsdale College. His Irish charges finished the year 3–1–1, losing only to Albion in the season finale. At Hillsdale, Morrison spent just one week. His Hillsdale team was shut out 12–0 on the road at Albion College.

In the spring of 1895, James L. Morrison received his law degree from the University of Michigan.

James McWeeney

James L. McWeeney (October 8, 1866, Glencoe, WI, USA - December 11, 1940) was an American football coach. He was the son of James and Catherine (Scanlon) McWeeney. He served as the head coach at the University of Notre Dame in 1899, tallying a mark of 6–3–1.

James left home at an early age and sold farm machinery in Montana and the Dakota Territories. He went to Chicago in 1885 and worked for the West Division Railway Co. for several years. On June 21, 1890 he joined the Chicago police force. On March 14, 1898 he became a patrol sergeant (History of St Joseph County and the Chicago Police Register 1897-1904). While in Chicago he lived at 1400 Warren Ave. and then at 6551 Lexington Ave.

He was an amateur and professional wrestler and won contest in Greco-Roman wrestling. He traveled to many cities and was regarded as among the best wrestlers in the country. He played football for the Chicago Athletic Club. He was a left guard and was one of the first westerners to show cleverness and originality in the game. McWeeney may not have been a college football player, but was a remarkable athlete in both football and wrestling. He was a lineman (guard) on the Chicago Athletic Association's team that played games across the country, some of them against teams of former Yale, Harvard and other Eastern players.

On August 12, 1899 he resigned from the police force and went to Notre Dame to become football coach and wrestling coach in order to attend the law school. He graduated in 1901. McWeeney's brothers, Patrick and John, also were Chicago policemen. John later became Chicago police superintendent. McWeeney's 1899 team posted a 6-3-1 record, including losses to Chicago and Michigan.

McWeeney succeeded Frank Hering, Notre Dame's first regular coach, but in 1900, McWeeney continued in law school and Australian and former Wisconsin player Pat O'Dea took over as coach.

Football coach McWeeney had a long career as a Greco-Roman wrestler and competed in bouts across the country, including a well-reported exhibition match at Notre Dame against champion John J. Rooney.

In 1902 he became chief of police for South Bend, Indiana after two years on the force. He lived in Chicago for a few years and in 1917 he moved to Gillespie, Illinois where he was a mine inspector.

He married Elizabeth Ganey. They had three sons named James, Edward, and Frank. They also adopted a daughter named Agnes.

James McWeeney died at age 74 from complications after an automobile accident in 1940.

From "T h e N o t r e D a m e A l u m n u s" VoL 19. FEBRUARY, 1941 No. 4., page 19:

"James L. McWeeny, 68 years old, Gillespie,

I11., football and wrestling coach at Notre Dame

in 1890-00, died on Dec. 23 as the result of severe

injuries suffered in an automobile accident on

Dec. 11. Upon leaving Notre Dame Mr. McWeeny joined the South Bend police department,

serving as police chief from 1902 to 1910. He

had been a wrestler of national reputation."

Jesse Harper

Jesse Clair Harper (December 10, 1883 – July 31, 1961) was an American football and baseball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Alma College (1906–1907), Wabash College (1909–1912), and the University of Notre Dame (1913–1917), compiling a career college football record of 57–17–7. Harper was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1971.

Joe Kuharich

Joseph Lawrence Kuharich (April 14, 1917 – January 25, 1981) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of San Francisco from 1948 to 1951 and at the University of Notre Dame from 1959 to 1962, compiling a career college football record of 42–37. Kuharich was also the head coach of the Chicago Cardinals in 1952, the Washington Redskins from 1954 to 1958, and the Philadelphia Eagles from 1964 to 1968, amassing a career coaching record of 58–81–3 in the National Football League (NFL). He played football as a guard at Notre Dame from 1935 to 1937 and with the Chicago Cardinals in 1940, 1941 and 1945. Kuharich's death fell on the day the Eagles lost Super Bowl XV to the Oakland Raiders.

John L. Marks

John L. "Jack" Marks was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame from 1911 to 1912, compiling a record of 13–0–2. Marks played college football at Dartmouth College.On October 5, 1912, in one of the easiest victories in Notre Dame history, junior quarterback Gus Dorais led the Irish to a 116–7 rout of St. Viator in the season-opener.

Kent Baer

Kent Lex Baer (born May 2, 1951) is an American college football coach. He is the defensive coordinator at the University of Montana, a position he had held since 2018. Baer served as the interim head football coach at the University of Notre Dame for one game in 2005 and at San Jose State University for one game in 2012.

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football seasons

This is a list of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football season records. The Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team is the football team of the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, United States. The team competes as an Independent at the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision level.

Notre Dame has the most consensus national championships and has produced more All-Americans than any other Football Bowl Subdivision school. Additionally, seven Fighting Irish football players have won the Heisman Trophy.

Notre Dame is one of only two Catholic universities that field a team in the Football Bowl Subdivision, the other being Boston College, and one of a handful of programs independent of a football conference. The team plays its home games on Notre Dame's campus at Notre Dame Stadium, also known as the "House that Rockne Built," which has a capacity of 80,795.

Notre Dame claims national championships in an additional three seasons, for a total of 11 consensus national championships. Notre Dame, however, is often credited with 13 national championships in total. The 1938 and 1953 seasons are the reason for the discrepancy. In 1938, 8-1 Notre Dame was awarded the national championship by the Dickinson System, while Texas Christian (which finished 11-0) was awarded the championship by the Associated Press. In the 1953 season, an undefeated Notre Dame team (9-0-1) was named national champion by every major selector except the AP and UPI (Coaches) polls, where the Irish finished second in both to 10-1 Maryland. As Notre Dame has a policy of only recognizing AP and Coaches Poll national championships post-1936, the school does not officially recognize the 1938 and 1953 national championships.

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish head football coaches

This is a list of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football head coaches. The Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team is the football team of the University of Notre Dame, located in South Bend, Indiana, United States. The team competes as an Independent at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision level. Notre Dame has produced more All-Americans than any other Football Bowl Subdivision school. Additionally, seven Fighting Irish football players have won the Heisman Trophy. Notre Dame is one of only two Catholic universities that field a team in the Football Bowl Subdivision, the other being Boston College, and one of a handful of programs independent of a football conference. The team plays its home games on Notre Dame's campus at Notre Dame Stadium, also known as the "House that Rockne Built", which has a capacity of 80,795. The head coach is Brian Kelly.

Louis J. Salmon

Louis J. "Red" Salmon (June 10, 1880 – September 27, 1965) is considered to be the first outstanding fullback for the University of Notre Dame football team. He was the first "Fighting Irish" player to win an All-American mention, and some sports historians argue that he served as the team's de facto coach during the 1902–1903 season. This honor, however, is often accorded to teammate James Farragher. Both men are widely credited as acting head coaches in official histories of the "Fighting Irish" football team, and Salmon is recognized as head coach during the 1903–1904 season.

Pat O'Dea

Patrick John "Kangaroo Kicker" O'Dea (17 March 1872 – 5 April 1962) was an Australian rules and American football player and coach. An Australian by birth, O'Dea played Australian rules football for the Melbourne Football Club in the Victorian Football Association (VFA). In 1898 and 1899, O'Dea played American football at the University of Wisconsin–Madison in the United States, where he excelled in the kicking game. He then served as the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame from 1900 to 1901 and at the University of Missouri in 1902, compiling a career college football record of 19–7–2. O'Dea was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1962.

Terry Brennan

Terence Patrick Brennan (born June 11, 1928) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame from 1954 to 1958, compiling a record of 32–18.

Victor M. Place

Victor Morton Place (November 26, 1876 – June 16, 1923) was an American football player, coach, and lawyer. He played college football at Dartmouth College from 1900 to 1902, serving as the team captain in 1902. He served as the head football coach at Ohio Wesleyan University from 1903 to 1905, at the University of Washington from 1906 to 1907, and at the University of Notre Dame in 1908, compiling a career record of 30–24–6. His single loss as Notre Dame's head coach was at an away game against the Michigan Wolverines, a significant football rival since 1887.The following is a description of the 1909 Notre Dame team from Michael Steele's The Fighting Irish Football Encyclopedia:

"Victor Place [Notre Dame's coach in 1908] was replaced by Frank Longman, a former fullback for Yost from 1903 to 1905. He had coached at Arkansas and Wooster; at Wooster he had beaten Ohio State, the first time in 18 tries for the small school. In picking Longman, Notre Dame signalled [sic] the end of the domination of eastern personnel and methods."

Place died at Brookings, Oregon in a logging accident in 1923.

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