Henry Ellard

Henry Austin Ellard (born July 21, 1961) is a former American football wide receiver who played for the Los Angeles Rams (1983–1993), Washington Redskins (1994–1998), and the New England Patriots (1998) of the National Football League (NFL). Ellard also qualified for the Olympic trials in 1992 in the triple jump, although he injured his hamstring during the Trials and did not make the team.[1]

Henry Ellard
No. 80, 85, 17
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:July 21, 1961 (age 57)
Fresno, California
Career information
High school:Herbert Hoover
(Fresno, California)
College:Fresno State
NFL Draft:1983 / Round: 2 / Pick: 32
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:814
Receiving yards:13,777
Touchdowns:65
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school and college

Ellard attended Hoover High School in Fresno, California. He won the CIF California State Championships in the triple jump in 1979[2] For college, Ellard stayed in town and attended Fresno State University from 1979 to 1982 where he set an NCAA record with 1,510 receiving yards in his final season. In Fresno State history, Ellard is tied for third in touchdown catches (25), fifth in receiving yards (2,947) and 11th in receptions (138). [3]

  • 1979: 9 catches for 136 yards with 3 TD
  • 1980: 28 catches for 493 yards with 3 TD.[4]
  • 1981: 39 catches for 808 yards with 4 TD.[5]
  • 1982: 61 catches for 1510 yards with 15 TD.[6]

Ellard still holds the NCAA record for yards per catch in a season, 24.4, set while playing for Fresno State in 1982. His Quarterback was current Fresno State head coach Jeff Tedford.

Professional career

Ellard was drafted in the second round (32nd overall) of the 1983 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams. In his eleven seasons with Los Angeles he went to three Pro Bowls, first selected as a punt returner in 1984, then as a wide receiver in 1988 and 1989. At the time of his retirement, Ellard held Rams' team records for career receptions (593), receiving yards (9,761), 100-yard games (26), punt return average (11.3), and total offense (11,663).[7]

Upon joining the Redskins, Ellard set off on a blistering pace for the 1994 season, ending it with 1,397 yards, 102 behind league-leader Jerry Rice. He had three consecutive 1,000 yard seasons, giving him seven for his career (his 799 yards in the strike-shortened 1987 season was on pace for an eighth). His final 1,000 yard season came in 1996 and required a 155-yard performance against the Dallas Cowboys second-ranked defense to push him to 1,014 yards for the season.

As his production declined, Ellard became expendable, and found himself as a member of the Patriots in 1998. He retired after the 1998 season with 814 receptions for 13,777 yards, which placed him third on the all-time list, and 65 touchdowns. He also gained 1,527 yards returning punts, 364 yard returning kickoffs, 50 rushing yards, and 4 punts returned for a touchdown. Overall, he gained 15,718 total yards.[8]

NFL statistics

Receiving Stats
Year
Team
Rec
Yards
AVG
LG
TD
1983 Los Angeles Rams 16 268 16.8 44 0
1984 Los Angeles Rams 34 622 18.3 63t 6
1985 Los Angeles Rams 54 811 15.0 64t 5
1986 Los Angeles Rams 34 447 13.1 34t 4
1987 Los Angeles Rams 51 799 15.7 81t 3
1988 Los Angeles Rams 86 1,414 16.4 68 10
1989 Los Angeles Rams 70 1,382 19.7 53 8
1990 Los Angeles Rams 76 1,294 17.0 50t 4
1991 Los Angeles Rams 64 1,052 16.4 38 3
1992 Los Angeles Rams 47 727 15.5 33t 3
1993 Los Angeles Rams 61 945 15.5 54 2
1994 Washington Redskins 74 1,397 18.9 73t 6
1995 Washington Redskins 56 1,005 17.9 59 5
1996 Washington Redskins 52 1,014 19.4 51 2
1997 Washington Redskins 32 485 15.2 27 4
1998 Washington Redskins 2 29 14.5 19 0
1998 New England Patriots 5 86 17.2 19 0
TOTAL 814 13,777 16.9 81t 65

Coaching career

After his retirement, Ellard became an assistant coach at Southern California Christian High School, then became an assistant track-and-field coach at Villa Park High School. In 2000, he was a coach at Fresno State before taking the receivers coaching job for the St. Louis Rams in 2001. On January 25, 2009 Ellard came to the New York Jets as the wide receivers coach.[9][10] He was named the wide receivers coach for the New Orleans Saints on March 14, 2012,[11] and spent three seasons with the club before leaving after the 2014 season.[12] He now is the head football coach at San Antonio Christian High School. The most notable players he coached were Tory Holt, Issac Bruce, Parker Johnson, Brandon Trevino, and[13]Drew Brees.

References

  1. ^ Weyler, John (September 13, 1993). "The Ellard of Old Shows Up for This One". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 12, 2010.
  2. ^ "California State Meet Results - 1915 to present". Hank Lawson. Retrieved December 25, 2012.
  3. ^ http://www.gobulldogs.com/sports/m-footbl/mtt/ellard_henry00.html Fresno State Bio
  4. ^ http://www.totalfootballstats.com/Team_College.asp?id=80&Season=1980
  5. ^ http://www.totalfootballstats.com/Team_College.asp?id=80&Season=1981
  6. ^ http://www.totalfootballstats.com/Team_College.asp?id=80&Season=1982
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on January 8, 2011. Retrieved March 2, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) Planet Rams
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 9, 2010. Retrieved March 2, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) Sports Focus
  9. ^ Thomas, Jim (January 24, 2009). "Ellard to Jets, Baggett in as WRs coach with St. Louis Rams". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Archived from the original on February 26, 2009. Retrieved October 3, 2009.
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on February 19, 2010. Retrieved March 2, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) NY Jets
  11. ^ http://www.neworleanssaints.com/news-and-events/article-1/Saints-Name-Henry-Ellard-as-Wide-Receivers-Coach/3554d4ee-4016-4cd5-b682-a3d2e1054160
  12. ^ https://www.si.com/nfl/2015/01/02/new-orleans-saints-coaches-henry-ellard-terry-malone
  13. ^ Drew Brees

External links

1982 Fresno State Bulldogs football team

The 1982 Fresno State Bulldogs football team represented California State University, Fresno during the 1982 NCAA Division I-A football season as a member of the Pacific Coast Athletic Association. The team was led by head coach Jim Sweeney, in his fifth year, and played their home games at Bulldog Stadium in Fresno, California. They finished the 1982 season as champions of the PCAA with a record of ten wins and one loss (10–1, 6–0 PCAA).

Fresno State earned their first Division I-A postseason bowl game after the 1982 season. They played the Bowling Green Falcons in the second annual California Bowl in their own stadium on December 18. The Bulldogs beat Bowling Green 29–28.

1984 All-Pro Team

The 1984 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News in 1984. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1984 the Pro Football Writers Association chose only one defensive tackle and two inside linebackers in a pure 3-4 format. Pro Football Weekly added a "Special Teams" player, a non-returner who excelled in special teams play.

1984 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1984 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 47th season in the National Football League, their 48th overall, and their 39th in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Rams looked to improve on their 9–7 record from 1983 and make the playoffs for the second consecutive season and 10th in the last 12. They improved on their record by one game, going 10–6, good enough for second place in the NFC West behind the 15–1 San Francisco 49ers. In the playoffs, the Rams lost a low-scoring game to the New York Giants at home, 16–13. During this season, second-year running back Eric Dickerson set the NFL record for most rushing yards in a season, with 2,105 yards.

1985 All-Pro Team

The 1985 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News in 1985. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

Pro Football Weekly, which suspended operations in 1985, did not choose an All-Pro team.

1985 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1985 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 48th season in the National Football League, their 38th overall, and their 40th in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Rams played in the NFC Championship Game, but were shutout by the eventual Super Bowl champion Chicago Bears. Eric Dickerson rushed for 1,234 yards in 1985 while missing the first two games while in a contract dispute. He missed the Pro Bowl for the first time in his short NFL career. He did, however, go on to rush for a playoff record 248 yards against the Dallas Cowboys in post-season play. It was also the last time the Rams would win an NFC West divisional title for Los Angeles until 2017, and the last NFC West title until 1999 while they were in St. Louis.

1988 All-Pro Team

The 1988 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1988. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1988 the Associated Press did not choose a kick returner.

1988 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1988 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 51st season in the National Football League, their 41st overall, and their 43rd in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The team improved on a disappointing 6–9 record the previous year, going 10–6 and qualifying as a Wild Card before losing to the Minnesota Vikings in the NFC Wild Card game.

1989 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1989 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 52nd season in the National Football League, their 42nd overall, and their 44th in the Greater Los Angeles Area. It constituted their last postseason appearance in Los Angeles before owner Georgia Frontiere, who would eventually move the team to St. Louis six seasons later, sold many top players, and in the playoffs, they were defeated by the eventual Super Bowl champion San Francisco 49ers.

It also constituted their last winning season until 1999 in St. Louis, and last in Los Angeles until 2017.

1995 Washington Redskins season

The 1995 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 64th season in the National Football League. The team improved on their 3–13 record from 1994, but missed the playoffs for the third consecutive season.

Bern Brostek

Bern Orion Brostek (born September 11, 1966) is a former American football offensive lineman in the National Football League for the Los Angeles and St. Louis Rams from 1990 to 1997.

Damone Johnson

Damone Johnson (born March 2, 1962) is a former professional American football tight end in the National Football League. He played seven seasons for the Los Angeles Rams.

Henry Ellard and Damone Johnson were the top two leading receivers for the Los Angeles Rams football team in the year 1987.

Ellard

Ellard is a surname and given name. The surname is found in Ireland among other places. Notable people with the name include:

Surname:

Brian Ellard (born 1940), Canadian educator, musicologist, arranger, and conductor

David Ellard (born 1989), Australian rules footballer

Henry Ellard (born 1961), former American football wide receiver

Kelly Ellard, murderer of Reena Virk in Saanich, British Columbia, Canada

Tom Ellard (born 1962), Australian electronic musicianGiven name:

Ellard O'Brien (born 1930), retired Canadian professional ice hockey player

Ellard A. Walsh (1887–1975), U.S. National Guard and Army officer

Fresno State Bulldogs football statistical leaders

The Fresno State Bulldogs football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Fresno State Bulldogs football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Bulldogs represent California State University, Fresno in the NCAA's Mountain West Conference (MW).

Fresno State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1921, but these lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1979, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Bulldogs have played in 11 bowl games since this decision, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.

Similarly, the Bulldogs have appeared in the Mountain West Conference Football Championship Game twice since it began in 2013.

Additionally, Fresno State has been grouped in the same MW football division as Hawaii since divisional play began in 2013, meaning that it plays at Hawaii every other year (currently in even-numbered years). This is relevant because the NCAA allows teams that play at Hawaii in a given season to schedule 13 regular-season games instead of the normal 12. The Bulldogs have played a 13-game regular season once since divisional play began, in 2014.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

Isaac Bruce

Isaac Isidore Bruce (born November 10, 1972) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams in the second round of the 1994 NFL Draft. He played college football for the University of Memphis.

An All-Pro and four-time Pro Bowl selection, Bruce amassed 15,208 receiving yards in his career (fifth all-time). He played the first 14 years with the Rams and won a Super Bowl ring with the team in Super Bowl XXXIV over the Tennessee Titans. He also played for the San Francisco 49ers. During his time with the Rams, he was the leading wide receiver of “The Greatest Show on Turf”.

List of Washington Redskins receiving leaders

The list of Washington Redskins receiving leaders includes single-season and career records for each of three statistics: yardage, number of receptions, and receiving touchdowns, as well as single-game records for receptions and receiving yards. The Redskins compete in the East Division of the National Football Conference. The franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.The Redskins have played over one thousand games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl XVII, XXII and XXVI. They also played in and lost the 1936, 1940, 1943 and 1945 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl VII and XVIII. They have made 22 postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 23 wins and 17 losses. Only five teams have appeared in more Super Bowls than the Redskins: the Pittsburgh Steelers (eight), Dallas Cowboys (eight), Denver Broncos (eight), New England Patriots (eight) and San Francisco 49ers (six); the Redskins' five appearances are tied with the Oakland Raiders and Miami Dolphins.

Los Angeles Rams awards

This page details awards won by the Los Angeles Rams American football team. The Rams were formerly based in St. Louis (1995–2015) and Cleveland (1936–1942, 1944–1945), as well as Los Angeles (1946–1994, 2016–present).

Los Angeles Rams statistics

This page details statistics about the Los Angeles Rams American football franchise, formerly the St. Louis Rams and the Cleveland Rams.

Marcus Riley

Marcus Riley (born April 14, 1984) is a former American football linebacker. He was signed by the Green Bay Packers as an undrafted free agent in 2008. He played college football at Fresno State.

Riley has also been a member of the St. Louis Rams and Chicago Bears.

West Coast Relays

Started April 30, 1927, the West Coast Relays grew to one of the premier track and field events in the United States. Held in Fresno's Ratcliffe Stadium, it was the site of thirty-six world records and many national and collegiate records. It became the home of the debut of some of the Central Valley's best known athletes; Bob Mathias, Dutch Warmerdam, Rafer Johnson, Tommie Smith and Henry Ellard. Participants included future stars of other sports; Jackie Robinson, O.J. Simpson, Willie Gault, and Bill Russell.The delay in replacing the outdated clay track at Ratcliffe Stadium damaged the meet and the event was discontinued after the 1982 edition. The meet was revived in 1991 as the Bob Mathias Fresno Relays and was held at Warmerdam Field at Fresno State.By 2006 the meet moved again to Buchanan High School in Clovis, California. The revived West Coast Relays since then has been an annual high school-only track and field meet.

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