Heinie Zimmerman

Henry Zimmerman (February 9, 1887 – March 14, 1969), known as "Heinie" or "The Great Zim", was a professional baseball infielder. Zimmerman played in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs and New York Giants from 1907 to 1919. During his playing career, Zimmerman was primarily a third baseman, although he also played extensively at second base. He was born and died in The Bronx, New York City, and was of German ancestry. He is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx, New York City.

Heinie Zimmerman
Heinie Zimmerman
Zimmerman in 1919
Third baseman / Second baseman
Born: February 9, 1887
New York City, New York
Died: March 14, 1969 (aged 82)
New York City, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 8, 1907, for the Chicago Cubs
Last MLB appearance
September 10, 1919, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.295
Home runs58
Runs batted in799
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

In 1912, Zimmerman led the National League in batting and in home runs, but failed to win the triple crown, as Honus Wagner was thought to have led the league in RBIs, though recent research[1] has suggested that in fact Zimmerman deserved the triple crown after all. He was also an important member of the 1908 Cubs, the last Cubs team to win the World Series prior to 2016. Zimmerman was #98 on the "Top 100 Cubs of All Time" list as compiled by the web site "Bleed Cubbie Blue".[2]

Zimmerman was suspended from the New York Giants in 1919, along with his friend Hal Chase, for allegedly attempting to convince other players to fix games. Based on testimony by Giants manager John McGraw during the Black Sox Scandal hearings, Zimmerman and Chase were both indicted for bribery. Zimmerman denied McGraw's accusations, and neither he nor Chase was ever proven to be directly connected to the Black Sox, but based on a long-term pattern of corruption both were permanently banned from baseball by Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Commissioner of Baseball. According to some historians, he had been informally banned after the Giants released him. Baseball statistician Bill James has suggested that the Giants' loss to the Chicago White Sox in the 1917 World Series may have been partial motivation for Zimmerman's suspension. Zimmerman batted .120 in the Series.

However, he is best known for an infamous rundown in the decisive game. In the fourth inning, the game was scoreless when Chicago's Eddie Collins was caught between third base and home plate. Catcher Bill Rariden ran up the line to start a rundown, expecting pitcher Rube Benton or first baseman Walter Holke to cover the plate. However, neither of them budged, and Collins blew past Rariden to score what turned out to be the Series-winning run (the White Sox won 4-2). With no one covering the plate, third baseman Zimmerman was forced to chase Collins, pawing helplessly in the air with the ball in a futile attempt to tag him. As pointed out by researcher Richard A. Smiley in SABR's 2006 edition of The National Pastime, Zimmerman was long blamed for losing the game, although McGraw blamed Benton and Holke for failing to cover the plate—a serious fundamental error in baseball. The play was actually quite close, as action photos show Zimmerman leaping over the sliding Collins. A quote often attributed to Zim, but actually invented by writer Ring Lardner some years later, was that when asked about the incident Zim replied, "Who the hell was I supposed to throw to, Klem (umpire Bill Klem, who was working the plate)?"

In 1,456 games played, Zimmerman batted .295 (1566-5304) with 695 runs scored, 275 doubles, 105 triples, 58 home runs, 799 RBI, 175 stolen bases, an on-base percentage of .331 and a slugging percentage of .419 in 13 seasons. In 12 World Series games, he hit .163 (7-43) with 2 RBI.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-03-06. Retrieved 2015-03-06.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ Yellon, Al (2006-11-12). "The Top 100 Cubs Of All Time – #98 Heinie Zimmerman". Bleed Cubbie Blue. Retrieved 2012-06-11.

Sources

  • James, Bill. The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. New York: The Free Press, 2001.

External links

1907 Chicago Cubs season

The 1907 Chicago Cubs season was the 36th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 32nd in the National League and the 15th at West Side Park. It was the first season that the Chicago Cubs became the franchise's name officially. The team finished in first place in the National League with a record of 107–45, 17 games ahead of the Pittsburgh Pirates. It was their second straight NL pennant. The Cubs faced the Detroit Tigers in the 1907 World Series, which they won four games to none (with one tie) for their first World Series victory.

1908 Chicago Cubs season

The 1908 Chicago Cubs season was the 37th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 33rd in the National League and the 16th at West Side Park. It involved the Cubs winning their third consecutive National League pennant, as well as the World Series.

This team included four future Hall of Famers: manager / first baseman Frank Chance, second baseman Johnny Evers, shortstop Joe Tinker, and pitcher Mordecai Brown. In 1908, Brown finished second in the NL in wins and ERA. This would be the last World Series victory for the Cubs until the 2016 World Series.

1909 Chicago Cubs season

The 1909 Chicago Cubs season was the 38th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 34th in the National League and the 17th at West Side Park. The Cubs won 104 games but finished second in the National League, 6½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Cubs had won the pennant the previous three years and would win it again in 1910. Of their 104 victories, 97 were wins for a Cubs starting pitcher; this was the most wins in a season by the starting staff of any major league team from 1908 to the present day.The legendary infield of Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, Frank Chance, and Harry Steinfeldt was still intact, but it was the pitching staff that excelled. The Cubs pitchers had a collective earned run average of 1.75, a microscopic figure even for the dead-ball era. Three Finger Brown was one of the top two pitchers in the league (with Christy Mathewson) again, going 27–9 with a 1.31 ERA.

1910 Chicago Cubs season

The 1910 Chicago Cubs season was the 39th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 35th in the National League and the 18th at West Side Park. The Cubs finished first in the National League with a record of 104–50, 13 games ahead of the second place New York Giants. The team was defeated four games to one by the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1910 World Series.

1911 Chicago Cubs season

The 1911 Chicago Cubs season was the 40th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 36th in the National League and the 19th at West Side Park. The Cubs finished second in the National League with a record of 92–62.

1912 Chicago Cubs season

The 1912 Chicago Cubs season was the 41st season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 37th in the National League and the 20th at West Side Park. The Cubs finished third in the National League with a record of 91–59. Third baseman Heinie Zimmerman led the circuit in home runs, batting average, and slugging percentage.

1912 Major League Baseball season

1912 Major League Baseball season. Harper's Weekly conducted a detailed accounting of the expenses of Major League clubs, and came up with a figure of around $175,000 to $200,000.

1913 Chicago Cubs season

The 1913 Chicago Cubs season was the 42nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 38th in the National League and the 21st at West Side Park. The Cubs finished third in the National League with a record of 88–65.

1914 Chicago Cubs season

The 1914 Chicago Cubs season was the 43rd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 39th in the National League and the 22nd at West Side Park. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 78–76.

1916 Chicago Cubs season

The 1916 Chicago Cubs season was the 45th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 41st in the National League and the 1st at Wrigley Field (then known as "Weeghman Park"). The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 67–86.

1916 Major League Baseball season

The 1916 Major League Baseball season.

1916 New York Giants season

The 1916 New York Giants season was the franchise's 34th season. The team finished in fourth place in the National League with an 86-66 record, 7 games behind the Brooklyn Robins. This season introduced a new uniform design.

1917 Major League Baseball season

The 1917 Major League Baseball season.

1917 New York Giants season

The 1917 New York Giants season was the franchise's 35th season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant for the first time in four years. The team went on to lose to the Chicago White Sox in the 1917 World Series, four games to two.

1917 World Series

In the 1917 World Series, the Chicago White Sox beat the New York Giants four games to two. The Series was played against the backdrop of World War I, which dominated the American newspapers that year and next.

The strong Chicago White Sox club had finished the 1917 season with a 100–54 record: their first and only one-hundred-win season in franchise history as of 2018. The Sox's next World Series winner in 2005 would finish the regular season with a 99–63 record.

The Sox won Game 1 of the Series in Chicago 2–1 behind a complete game by Eddie Cicotte. Happy Felsch hit a home run in the fourth inning that provided the winning margin. The Sox beat the Giants in Game 2 by a score of 7–2 behind another complete game effort by Red Faber to take a 2–0 lead in the Series.

Back in New York for Game 3, Cicotte again threw a complete game, but the Sox could not muster a single run against Giants starter Rube Benton and lost 2–0. In Game 4 the Sox were shut out again 5–0 by Ferdie Schupp. Faber threw another complete game, but the Series was even at 2–2 going back to Chicago.

Reb Russell started Game 5 in Chicago, but only faced three batters before giving way to Cicotte. Going into the bottom of the seventh inning, Chicago was down 5–2, but they rallied to score three in the seventh and three in the eighth to win 8–5. Faber pitched the final two innings for the win. In Game 6 the Sox took an early 3–0 lead and on the strength of another complete game victory from Faber (his third of the Series) won 4–2 and clinched the World Championship. Eddie Collins was the hitting hero, batting .409 over the six game series while Cicotte and Faber combined to pitch 50 out of a total 52 World Series innings to lead the staff.

The decisive game underscored the Giants' post-season frustrations, featuring a famous rundown in which Giants' third baseman Heinie Zimmerman futilely chased the speedy Eddie Collins toward home plate with what would be the Series-winning run. Catcher Bill Rariden had run up the third base line to start a rundown, expecting pitcher Rube Benton or first baseman Walter Holke to cover the plate. However, neither of them budged, forcing Zimmerman to chase Collins while pawing helplessly in the air with the ball in an attempt to tag him. Two years before the issue of baseball betting reached its peak, Zimmerman found himself having to publicly deny purposely allowing the run to score, i.e. to deny that he had "thrown" the game. In truth, McGraw blamed Benton and Holke for failing to cover the plate. A quote often attributed to Zim, but actually invented by writer Ring Lardner some years later, was that when asked about the incident Zim replied, "Who the hell was I supposed to throw to, Klem (umpire Bill Klem, who was working the plate)?" Conventional wisdom has it that Collins was much faster than Zimmerman, but existing photos of the play show that Zimmerman was only a step or two behind Collins, who actually slid across the plate while Zim jumped over him to avoid trampling him. Zimmerman would eventually be banned for life due to various accusations of corruption.

The great athlete Jim Thorpe, better known for football in general, made his only World Series "appearance" during Game 5, where he was listed in the lineup card as starting in right field; but for his turn at bat in the top of the first inning he was replaced by a left-handed hitting Dave Robertson.

The White Sox, who were essentially dismantled following the 1920 season by baseball commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis due to the Black Sox Scandal in the 1919 World Series, did not make it to another World Series until 1959, and did not win another World Series until 2005.

Heinie Berger

Charles Carl "Heinie" Berger (January 7, 1882 – February 10, 1954), was a Major League Baseball pitcher. Berger played for four seasons for the Cleveland Naps (1907–1910).

Berger, a native of Greenfield, Indiana, started his professional baseball career with the Spring Lake Park semi-pro team. Twice he won 20 games in the minors before coming to the majors.He made his major league debut May 6, 1907, and played his final game on July 22, 1910. His best years were 1908 and 1909, with Berger winning 13 games in each of those seasons. He started 68 games for the Naps and ended his career with a 32–29 win loss record and a 2.60 earned run average.

In 1909, he led all American League pitchers, striking out an average of 5.90 batters per 9-innings pitched. He struck out a total of 162 batters in 1909, 3rd in the American League. Berger also led the league in wild pitches in 1909 with 13.

"Heinie" was a popular nickname for German baseball players in the early part of the 20th century. Berger was one of 22 major league Heinie's in the first half of the century. Others include: Heinie Beckendorf (1909–1910); Heinie Groh (1912–1927); Heinie Manush (1923–1939) (the only Hall of Fame "Heinie"); Heinie Meine (1922–1934); Heinie Mueller (1920–1935); Heinie Mueller (1938–1941); Heinie Peitz (1892–1913); Heinie Reitz (1893–1899); Heinie Sand (1923–1928); Heinie Schuble (1927–1936); Heinie Smith (1897–1903); Heinie Stafford (1914); Heinie Wagner (1902–1918); and Heinie Zimmerman (1907–1919). No major league player has been known by the nickname "Heinie" since World War II.

Berger is buried at Lake View Cemetery Cuyahoga County, Ohio.

Heinie Kappel

Henry "Heinie" Kappel (September 1863 – August 27, 1905) was an American infielder in Major League Baseball who was born and died in Philadelphia. Kappel played three seasons in the major leagues with the Cincinnati Red Stockings (1887–1888) and the Columbus Solons (1889). Kappel played in 105 games: 49 games at shortstop, 33 at third base, and 16 at second base. As a batter, he had 54 hits, 51 runs batted in, and a .269 career batting average.

"Heinie" was a popular nickname for German baseball players in the early part of the 20th century; in fact, 22 Heinies have played in the major leagues, and Kappel was the first. The others are: Heinie Beckendorf, 1909–1910; Heinie Berger, 1907–1910; Heinie Elder, 1913–1913; Heinie Groh, 1912–1927, known for his use of the "bottle bat"; Heinie Heitmuller, 1909–1910; Heinie Heltzel, 1943–1944; Heinie Jantzen, 1912–1912; Heinie Manush, 1923–1939, the only Hall of Famer; Heinie Meine 1922–1934, also known as "The Count of Luxemburg"; Heinie Mueller, 1920–1935; Heinie Mueller, 1938–1941; Heinie Odom, 1925–1925; Heinie Peitz, 1892–1913; Heinie Reitz, 1893–1899; Heinie Sand, 1923–1928; Heinie Scheer, 1922–1923; Heinie Schuble, 1927–1936; Heinie Smith, 1897–1903; Heinie Stafford, 1916–1916; Heinie Wagner, 1902–1918; and Heinie Zimmerman, 1907–1919, implicated in the Chicago "Black Sox" scandal.

Heinie Mueller (outfielder)

Clarence Francis "Heinie" Mueller (September 16, 1899 – January 23, 1975) was an American center and right fielder in Major League Baseball. Born in Creve Coeur, Missouri, Mueller debuted September 25, 1920, and played his final game on June 15, 1935. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1920–1926), New York Giants (1926–1927), Boston Braves (1928–1929), and St. Louis Browns (1935). In 11 seasons, Mueller played in 693 games (368 as a center fielder) and had a batting average of .282. He died in DeSoto, Missouri, at age 75.

"Heinie" was a popular nickname for German baseball players in the early part of the 20th century. Mueller was one of 22 major league Heinies in the first half of the century. Others include: Heinie Beckendorf 1909–1910, Heinie Berger 1907–1910, Heinie Elder 1913–1913, Heinie Groh 1912–1927 – of "bottle bat" fame, Heinie Heitmuller 1909–1910, Heinie Heltzel 1943–1944, Heinie Jantzen 1912–1912, Heinie Kappel 1887–1889, Heinie Manush 1923–1939 – the only Hall of Fame "Heinie", Heinie Meine 1922–1934, Heinie Mueller 1938–1941, Heinie Odom 1925–1925, Heinie Peitz 1892–1913, Heinie Reitz 1893–1899, Heinie Sand 1923–1928, Heinie Scheer 1922–1923, Heinie Schuble 1927–1936, Heinie Smith 1897–1903, Heinie Stafford 1916–1916, Heinie Wagner 1902–1918, and Heinie Zimmerman 1907–1919 – implicated in the Black Sox scandal. There have been no Heinies in the major leagues since World War II.

Heinie was the brother of fellow MLB player Walter Mueller.

Rollie Zeider

Rollie Hubert Zeider (November 16, 1883 – September 12, 1967) was a professional baseball player. An infielder (playing over 100 games at all four infield positions in his career), he played nine seasons in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Sox (1910–13), New York Yankees (1913), Chicago Chi-Feds/Chicago Whales in the Federal League from 1914–15, and lastly the Chicago Cubs (1916–18). He is one of only a few players to play for three different Chicago teams in his career, and one of two to do it in the 20th century. He is the only player to hit home runs for all three Chicago major league teams in the twentieth century. Along with Dutch Zwilling he is the only 20th century player to play in the same city in three different major leagues: American League (White Sox), Federal League (Chi-Feds/Whales), and the National League (Cubs).

Strangely, Zeider contributed to another odd record along with Zwilling. The 1916 Cubs were one of the few teams in history, and the most recent until 1999, to have three players whose last names begin with "Z": Zeider, Zwilling, and Heinie Zimmerman. The 1999 Texas Rangers were the first and only since then with Jeff Zimmerman, Todd Zeile, and Gregg Zaun.

His nickname Bunion was the result of a spike wound when Detroit Tigers outfielder Sam Crawford spiked his "bunion" during a play. Zeider's bunion became a news item when he was traded after the injury and his new club, the New York Yankees, later protested that the White Sox had not informed them that Zeider was injured at the time of the trade.

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