Heinie Wagner

Charles Francis "Heinie" Wagner (September 23, 1880 – March 20, 1943) was an American baseball player and manager. He played shortstop for the New York Giants (1902) and the Boston Red Sox (1906–1918). He was also the manager of the Red Sox during the 1930 baseball season.

Wagner was born in Harlem, New York, in September 1880. He began his baseball career playing for the Waverly Club in the New York State League in 1901. In 1902, he began the season playing for Columbus in the American Association,[1] and played briefly in 17 games for the New York Giants of the National League. He spent the remainder of the 1902 season with the Newark Sailors and continued to play for the Eastern League team through 1906.[2][3]

Heinie Wagner baseball card
Heinie Wagner baseball card

In 1906, Wagner joined the Boston Red Sox. He played for the Red Sox from 1906 to 1918, missing only the 1914 and 1917 seasons.[4] He was the captain of Boston's 1912 World Series championship team.[5] He also played for the Red Sox World Series championship teams in 1915, 1916 and 1918.[1] Wagner and Harry Hooper were the only players to play on all four of the Red Sox World Series championship teams of the era.[5]

Wagner was considered to be a valuable infielder while playing with the Red Sox and was reputed to have "an exceptionally powerful and accurate throw."[1] He was also known to block the basepaths with his "exceptionally big" feet.[6] With 141 career stolen bases for the Red Sox, Wagner ranked third in team history when he retired (trailing Hall of Famers Harry Hooper and Tris Speaker) and still ranks fifth on the all-time Red Sox stolen base list.[7]

After being released by the Red Sox in January 1916, Wagner served as the player-manager of the Hartford team in the Eastern League for the first part of the 1916 season.[8] He returned to the Red Sox in late June 1916.

In 1920, Wagner closed out his playing career as the player-manager of the Norfolk Mary Janes in the Virginia League.[9]

After seven years out of baseball, Wagner was hired as a coach for the Boston Red Sox under Bill Carrigan.[1] He was reported to be Carrigan's "right-hand man" during the 1928, 1929, and 1930 seasons. In 1930, he was hired as manager of the Red Sox after Carrigan retired.[10] In Wagner's sole season as manager, the Red Sox finished last in the American League with a 52–102 (.338) record.[11] On September 29, 1930, Wagner's resignation as manager of the Red Sox was accepted by team president Bob Quinn.[12] He never managed again.

After retiring from baseball, Wagner worked as the superintendent of a lumber yard in New Rochelle, New York. He also coached the baseball teams of the New Rochelle Police and Fire Departments and Elks Club.[1]

Wagner was married to Martha Hahn Wagner. They had two sons and four daughters. In March 1943, Wagner died of a heart ailment at his home on Van Guilder Avenue in New Rochelle at age 62.[1]

Heinie Wagner
-Heinie Wagner, Boston AL (baseball)- (LOC)
Shortstop / Manager
Born: September 23, 1880
New York, New York
Died: March 20, 1943 (aged 62)
New Rochelle, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 1, 1902, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
July 3, 1918, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.250
Hits834
Runs batted in343
Stolen bases144
Managerial record52–102
Winning %.338
Teams
As Player

As Manager

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Wagner, Ex-Pilot of Red Sox, Is Dead: Participant in Four World Series Stricken at 62 at His New Rochelle Home; Once a Member of Giants; Team-Mate of John McGraw and Christy Mathewson -- Began Career in 1901" (PDF). The New York Times. March 21, 1943.
  2. ^ "Heinie Wagner Minor League Statistics". baseball-reference.com.
  3. ^ "Captain Heinie Wagner of the Red Sox". The Hartford Courant. October 4, 1912.
  4. ^ "Heinie Wagner". Baseball-Reference.com.
  5. ^ a b Bill Littlefield, Richard Johnson (2004). Fall Classics: The Best Writing About the World Series' First 100 Years. Random House Digital, Inc. p. 308. ISBN 1-4000-4900-8.
  6. ^ The Ballplayers – Heinie Wagner | BaseballLibrary.com at www.baseballlibrary.com
  7. ^ "Boston Red Sox Top 10 Batting Leaders". baseball-reference.com.
  8. ^ "Charles "Heinie" Wagner Is Deposed as Manager: Old-Time Red Sox Star Released After Springfield Game--Fails to Come Through as Leader of Team--Hitting Is Also Very Weak". Hartford Courant. June 21, 1916.
  9. ^ "1920 Norfolk Mary Janes". baseball-reference.com.
  10. ^ "Heinie Wagner Named to Succeed Bill Carrigan". Reading Eagle. December 22, 1929.
  11. ^ "1930 Boston Red Sox". baseball-reference.com.
  12. ^ "Wagner Quits Post as red Sox Pilot: Carrigan's Successor and Once Famous Shortstop Resigns After One-Year Service" (PDF). The New York Times. September 30, 1930.

External links

1902 New York Giants season

The 1902 New York Giants season was the franchise's 20th season. The team finished in eighth place, last, in the National League with a 48–88 record, 53.5 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates. Their .353 winning percentage remains (as of 2016) the worst in franchise history.

1907 Boston Americans season

The 1907 Boston Americans season was the seventh season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 59 wins and 90 losses. Including spring training, the team had five different managers during the season. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1908 Boston Red Sox season

The 1908 Boston Red Sox season was the eighth season for the Major League Baseball franchise previously known as the Boston Americans. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1909 Boston Red Sox season

The 1909 Boston Red Sox season was the ninth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 88 wins and 63 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1910 Boston Red Sox season

The 1910 Boston Red Sox season was the tenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 81 wins and 72 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1911 Boston Red Sox season

The 1911 Boston Red Sox season was the eleventh season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 78 wins and 75 losses. This was the final season that the team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds, before moving to Fenway Park.

1912 Boston Red Sox season

The 1912 Boston Red Sox season was the twelfth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. This was the first year that the team played its home games at Fenway Park. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 105 wins and 47 losses. The team set the franchise record for highest winning percentage (.691) in a season, which still stands; tied the franchise record for fewest losses in a season, originally set by the 1903 club and not since equalled; and set a franchise record for most wins, which was not surpassed until the 2018 club.The team then faced the National League (NL) champion New York Giants in the 1912 World Series, which the Red Sox won in eight games to capture the franchise's second World Series. One of the deciding plays in the World Series was a muffed fly ball by Giants outfielder Fred Snodgrass, which became known as the "$30,000 muff" in reference to the prize money for the winning team.Behind center fielder Tris Speaker and pitcher Smoky Joe Wood, the Red Sox led the league in runs scored and fewest runs allowed. Speaker was third in batting and was voted league Most Valuable Player. Wood won 34 games, including a record 16 in a row. Although the pitching staff was satisfactory, the only star pitcher was Wood, while the only star in the starting lineup was Speaker. Little-known third baseman Larry Gardner was the next best hitter, while future Hall of Famer Harry Hooper had a poor offensive season.

1913 Boston Red Sox season

The 1913 Boston Red Sox season was the thirteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 79 wins and 71 losses.

1915 Boston Red Sox season

The 1915 Boston Red Sox season was the fifteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 101 wins and 50 losses. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Philadelphia Phillies in the 1915 World Series, which the Red Sox won in five games to capture the franchise's third World Series.

1916 Boston Red Sox season

The 1916 Boston Red Sox season was the sixteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 63 losses. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Brooklyn Robins in the 1916 World Series, which the Red Sox won in five games to capture the franchise's second consecutive and fourth overall World Series.

1918 Boston Red Sox season

The 1918 Boston Red Sox season was the eighteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 51 losses, in a season cut short due to World War I. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Chicago Cubs in the 1918 World Series, which the Red Sox won in six games to capture the franchise's fifth World Series. This would be the last World Series championship for the Red Sox until 2004.

The Red Sox' pitching staff, led by Carl Mays and Bullet Joe Bush, allowed the fewest runs in the league. Babe Ruth was the fourth starter and also spent significant time in the outfield, as he was the best hitter on the team, leading the AL in home runs and slugging percentage.

1929 Boston Red Sox season

The 1929 Boston Red Sox season was the 29th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 58 wins and 96 losses.

1930 Boston Red Sox season

The 1930 Boston Red Sox season was the 30th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 52 wins and 102 losses.

1930 Major League Baseball season

The 1930 Major League Baseball season.

Heinie Berger

Charles Carl "Heinie" Berger (January 7, 1882 – February 10, 1954), was a Major League Baseball pitcher. Berger played for four seasons for the Cleveland Naps (1907–1910).

Berger, a native of Greenfield, Indiana, started his professional baseball career with the Spring Lake Park semi-pro team. Twice he won 20 games in the minors before coming to the majors.He made his major league debut May 6, 1907, and played his final game on July 22, 1910. His best years were 1908 and 1909, with Berger winning 13 games in each of those seasons. He started 68 games for the Naps and ended his career with a 32–29 win loss record and a 2.60 earned run average.

In 1909, he led all American League pitchers, striking out an average of 5.90 batters per 9-innings pitched. He struck out a total of 162 batters in 1909, 3rd in the American League. Berger also led the league in wild pitches in 1909 with 13.

"Heinie" was a popular nickname for German baseball players in the early part of the 20th century. Berger was one of 22 major league Heinie's in the first half of the century. Others include: Heinie Beckendorf (1909–1910); Heinie Groh (1912–1927); Heinie Manush (1923–1939) (the only Hall of Fame "Heinie"); Heinie Meine (1922–1934); Heinie Mueller (1920–1935); Heinie Mueller (1938–1941); Heinie Peitz (1892–1913); Heinie Reitz (1893–1899); Heinie Sand (1923–1928); Heinie Schuble (1927–1936); Heinie Smith (1897–1903); Heinie Stafford (1914); Heinie Wagner (1902–1918); and Heinie Zimmerman (1907–1919). No major league player has been known by the nickname "Heinie" since World War II.

Berger is buried at Lake View Cemetery Cuyahoga County, Ohio.

Heinie Kappel

Henry "Heinie" Kappel (September 1863 – August 27, 1905) was an American infielder in Major League Baseball who was born and died in Philadelphia. Kappel played three seasons in the major leagues with the Cincinnati Red Stockings (1887–1888) and the Columbus Solons (1889). Kappel played in 105 games: 49 games at shortstop, 33 at third base, and 16 at second base. As a batter, he had 54 hits, 51 runs batted in, and a .269 career batting average.

"Heinie" was a popular nickname for German baseball players in the early part of the 20th century; in fact, 22 Heinies have played in the major leagues, and Kappel was the first. The others are: Heinie Beckendorf, 1909–1910; Heinie Berger, 1907–1910; Heinie Elder, 1913–1913; Heinie Groh, 1912–1927, known for his use of the "bottle bat"; Heinie Heitmuller, 1909–1910; Heinie Heltzel, 1943–1944; Heinie Jantzen, 1912–1912; Heinie Manush, 1923–1939, the only Hall of Famer; Heinie Meine 1922–1934, also known as "The Count of Luxemburg"; Heinie Mueller, 1920–1935; Heinie Mueller, 1938–1941; Heinie Odom, 1925–1925; Heinie Peitz, 1892–1913; Heinie Reitz, 1893–1899; Heinie Sand, 1923–1928; Heinie Scheer, 1922–1923; Heinie Schuble, 1927–1936; Heinie Smith, 1897–1903; Heinie Stafford, 1916–1916; Heinie Wagner, 1902–1918; and Heinie Zimmerman, 1907–1919, implicated in the Chicago "Black Sox" scandal.

Heinie Mueller (outfielder)

Clarence Francis "Heinie" Mueller (September 16, 1899 – January 23, 1975) was an American center and right fielder in Major League Baseball. Born in Creve Coeur, Missouri, Mueller debuted September 25, 1920, and played his final game on June 15, 1935. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1920–1926), New York Giants (1926–1927), Boston Braves (1928–1929), and St. Louis Browns (1935). In 11 seasons, Mueller played in 693 games (368 as a center fielder) and had a batting average of .282. He died in DeSoto, Missouri, at age 75.

"Heinie" was a popular nickname for German baseball players in the early part of the 20th century. Mueller was one of 22 major league Heinies in the first half of the century. Others include: Heinie Beckendorf 1909–1910, Heinie Berger 1907–1910, Heinie Elder 1913–1913, Heinie Groh 1912–1927 – of "bottle bat" fame, Heinie Heitmuller 1909–1910, Heinie Heltzel 1943–1944, Heinie Jantzen 1912–1912, Heinie Kappel 1887–1889, Heinie Manush 1923–1939 – the only Hall of Fame "Heinie", Heinie Meine 1922–1934, Heinie Mueller 1938–1941, Heinie Odom 1925–1925, Heinie Peitz 1892–1913, Heinie Reitz 1893–1899, Heinie Sand 1923–1928, Heinie Scheer 1922–1923, Heinie Schuble 1927–1936, Heinie Smith 1897–1903, Heinie Stafford 1916–1916, Heinie Wagner 1902–1918, and Heinie Zimmerman 1907–1919 – implicated in the Black Sox scandal. There have been no Heinies in the major leagues since World War II.

Heinie was the brother of fellow MLB player Walter Mueller.

List of Boston Red Sox captains

Eighteen different players have been full-time captains of the Boston Red Sox, an American professional baseball franchise also known previously as the Boston Americans. The list was created from scratch by baseball historian Howard W. Rosenberg in 2004. The Red Sox front office contacted Rosenberg in advance of Jason Varitek being named captain that year, after learning that Rosenberg, author of a 2003 book featuring captains in 19th-century baseball, had disputed the official count of captains in New York Yankees franchise history.In Major League Baseball, a captain is an honorary title given to the member of the team primarily responsible for strategy and teamwork while the game is in progress on the field. This role has been particularly important during eras and situations in which managers and coaches have been precluded by the rules from interacting with players on the field while the game is in progress. As is the case with the National Hockey League, then- and now-retired captain Varitek wore a distinctive "C" on the left side of his jersey.

Marty Krug

Martin John Krug (10 September 1888 – 27 June 1966) was a Koblenz, Germany-born major league infielder with the Boston Red Sox (1912) and Chicago Cubs (1922). He was a backup shortstop for the 1912 World Series champion Red Sox, but had little opportunity to play behind starter Heinie Wagner. He was primarily a third baseman for the 1922 Cubs.

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