Heini Becker

Heinrich Thomas "Heini" Becker AM (born 18 January 1935) is a former South Australian politician who represented the South Australian House of Assembly seats of Hanson from 1970 to 1993 and Peake from 1993 to 1997 for the Liberal Party. He was on the Public Accounts Committee and the Economic and Finance Committee.[1]

Becker's father was Dr. Johannes Heinrich Becker, who was interred during World War II for having Nazi connections, and was deported to West Germany in 1947.[2]

Heinrich Thomas Becker

Member of the South Australian Parliament
for Hanson
In office
30 May 1970 – 10 Dec 1993
Preceded byNew District
Succeeded byStewart Leggett
Member of the South Australian Parliament
for Peake
In office
11 Dec 1993 – 10 Oct 1997
Preceded byVic Heron
Succeeded byTom Koutsantonis
Personal details
Born18 January 1935 (age 84)
NationalityAustralian
Political partyLCL (1970-1974)
Liberal (1974-1997)

References

  1. ^ Heini Becker: SA Parliament
  2. ^ Biography - Johannes Heinrich Becker, Australian Dictionary of Biography
South Australian House of Assembly
New seat Member for Hanson
1970–1993
Succeeded by
Stewart Leggett
Preceded by
Vic Heron
Member for Peake
1993–1997
Succeeded by
Tom Koutsantonis
1985 South Australian state election

State elections were held in South Australia on 7 December 1985. All 47 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Premier of South Australia John Bannon increased its majority, and defeated the Liberal Party of Australia led by Leader of the Opposition John Olsen.

Candidates of the 1993 South Australian state election

This article provides information on candidates who stood for the 1993 South Australian state election, held on 11 December 1993.

Electoral district of Ashford

Ashford is a former electorate for the South Australian Legislative Assembly which included many of Adelaide's inner south western suburbs. The district formed part of three federal electorates: the Division of Hindmarsh, the Division of Boothby, and the Division of Adelaide. The former electorate included the suburbs of Ashford, Black Forest, Camden Park, Clarence Gardens, Clarence Park, Cumberland Park, Everard Park, Forestville, Glandore, Keswick, Kings Park, Novar Gardens and Plympton as well as parts of Edwardstown, Goodwood, Millswood, Plympton Park, South Plympton and Wayville. The former electorate covered an area of approximately 14.6 square kilometres (5.6 sq mi).

The electorate's name derives from the name given by early settler Charles George Everard to his property 'Ashford' in 1838 that was thought to have the best orchard in the colony. The name was also given to a suburb within the electorate. The district of Hanson was renamed to Ashford at the 2002 election. Hanson was re-drawn from a marginal Liberal to a marginal Labor electorate at the 1993 election. Often redistributed in all directions, particularly north and east, the only constant suburb in Ashford and Hanson has been the western half of Plympton. Incumbent Liberal MP Heini Becker moved to Peake, now West Torrens, however Ashford was still narrowly won by Liberal candidate Stewart Leggett. Up until its abolition, the seat was held by Labor member Steph Key who defeated Leggett at the 1997 election. A redistribution prior to the 2014 election saw Labor's margin significantly reduced from 4.8 percent to 0.6 percent however Labor retained the seat with an increased margin of 1.9 percent.

Ashford was replaced by Badcoe at the 2018 election; with a significant increase to the Labor margin in the seat resulting from the 2016 electoral redistribution. Key announced in February 2017 that she would retire from parliament as of the 2018 election.

Electoral district of Hanson

Hanson was an electoral district of the House of Assembly in the Australian state of South Australia from 1970 to 2002. The district was based in the western suburbs of Adelaide.

First won at the 1970 election by the Liberal and Country League on a two-party margin of just 0.4 percent, it bounced between a marginal to safe Liberal seat, held by Heini Becker, until it was transformed into a marginal Labor seat by the redistribution ahead of the 1993 election, but was retained by Liberal Stewart Leggett before being won by Labor for the first time at the 1997 election as a marginal Labor seat represented by Steph Key. Hanson was abolished and renamed to Ashford ahead of the 2002 election which Labor and Key have retained since.

Electoral district of Peake

Peake was an electoral district of the House of Assembly in the Australian state of South Australia from 1970 to 2002. The district was based in the western suburbs of Adelaide.

Typically a Labor seat, it was lost to the Liberal Party at the landslide 1993 state election. Peake was superseded by West Torrens at the 2002 state election.

Electoral results for the district of Hanson

This is a list of election results for the Electoral district of Hanson in South Australian elections.

Electoral results for the district of Peake

This is a list of electoral results for the Electoral district of Peake in South Australian elections.

Johannes Heinrich Becker

Dr. Johannes Heinrich Becker (27 September 1898 – 21 February 1961) was a German immigrant to Australia and member of the German Nazi Party. He immigrated to Australia in 1927. In 1933 he was appointed as the Nazi state trustee for Australia. He was later the state leader of the Nazi Party of Australia, but his leadership approach failed to impress the Nazi leadership in Berlin and he was removed as state leader in late 1936. During the World War II Becker was interned by the Australian authorities and after the war, in 1947, he was deported to West Germany, where he lived until his death in 1961.Becker's son, Heini Becker (born in 1935), served as a member of the South Australian Parliament from 1970 until 1997.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1970–1973

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1970 to 1973, as elected at the 1970 state election:

1 The Labor member for Adelaide, Sam Lawn, died on 25 May 1971. Labor candidate Jack Wright won the resulting by-election on 3 July 1971.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1973–1975

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1973 to 1975, as elected at the 1973 state election:

1 The LCL members for Goyder and Mitcham, Steele Hall and Robin Millhouse, resigned from the party in March 1973 and formed the Liberal Movement.

2 The Labor member for Semaphore, Reg Hurst, died on 31 March 1973. Labor candidate Jack Olson won the resulting by-election on 2 June 1973.

3 The Liberal Movement member for Goyder, Steele Hall, resigned on 11 April 1974 in order to run for the Australian Senate at the 1974 federal election. Liberal Movement candidate David Boundy won the resulting by-election on 8 June 1974.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1975–1977

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1975 to 1977, as elected at the 1975 state election:

1 The Country Party renamed itself to the National Country Party during the course of this term..

2 The Liberal Movement voted to rejoin the Liberal Party in May 1976, with one of its two MHAs, David Boundy, following suit. The second MHA, Robin Millhouse, who had fiercely opposed the merger, immediately founded a new party, the New LM, and served as its sole representative in the House of Assembly.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1977–1979

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1977 to 1979, as elected at the 1977 state election:

1 The Labor member for Norwood and outgoing Premier of South Australia, Don Dunstan, resigned due to ill health on 15 February 1979. Labor candidate Greg Crafter won the resulting by-election on 10 March 1979.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1979–1982

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1979 to 1982, as elected at the 1979 state election:

1 The election of the Liberal member for Norwood, Frank Webster was overturned by the Court of Disputed Returns on 22 January 1980. Labor candidate and former member Greg Crafter won the resulting by-election on 16 February 1980.

2 The Democrat member for Mitcham, Robin Millhouse, resigned on 7 April 1982 on his appointment to the Supreme Court of South Australia. Democrat candidate Heather Southcott won the resulting by-election on 8 May 1982.

3 The Labor member for Florey, Harold O'Neill, resigned on 11 August 1982. Labor candidate Bob Gregory won the resulting by-election on 4 September 1982.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1982–1985

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1982 to 1985, as elected at the 1982 state election:

1 The Liberal member for Bragg, David Tonkin, resigned on 10 April 1983. Liberal candidate Graham Ingerson won the resulting by-election on 14 May 1983.

2 The Labor member for Elizabeth, Peter Duncan, resigned on 25 October 1984 in order to contest the federal seat of Makin at the 1984 election. Independent candidate Martyn Evans won the resulting by-election on 1 December 1984.

3 The National Country Party changed its name to the National Party during the course of this term.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1985–1989

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1986 to 1989, as elected at the 1985 state election:

1 Stan Evans, the MLA for Davenport and former Liberal MLA for Fisher, had been re-elected as an independent in 1985 after losing a preselection battle against incumbent Liberal and factional opponent Dean Brown. Evans subsequently rejoined the Liberal Party in 1986.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1989–1993

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1989 to 1993, as elected at the 1989 state election:

1 The Liberal member for Custance, John Olsen, resigned on 6 May 1990 to take up a casual vacancy in the Australian Senate. Liberal candidate Ivan Venning won the resulting by-election on 23 June.

2 The member for Hartley, Terry Groom, was elected as a Labor member, but resigned from the party in 1991 after losing preselection to recontest his seat at the 1993 election.

3 The Liberal member for Alexandra, Ted Chapman, resigned on 11 March 1992. Liberal candidate Dean Brown won the resulting by-election on 9 May.

4 The Liberal member for Kavel, Roger Goldsworthy, resigned on 8 April 1992. Liberal candidate John Olsen won the resulting by-election on 9 May.

5 The member for Elizabeth, Martyn Evans, was elected as an independent, but joined the Labor Party in late 1993.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1993–1997

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1993 to 1997, as elected at the 1993 state election:

1 The Labor member for Elizabeth, Martyn Evans, resigned in early 1994 to contest a by-election for the federal seat of Bonython. Labor candidate Lea Stevens won the resulting by-election on 9 April 1994.

2 The Liberal member for Torrens, Joe Tiernan, died on 31 March 1994. Labor candidate Robyn Geraghty won the resulting by-election on 7 May 1994.

3 The Labor member for Taylor and former Premier of South Australia, Lynn Arnold, resigned in late 1994. Labor candidate Trish White won the resulting by-election on 5 November 1994.

South Australian House of Assembly

The House of Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the Parliament of South Australia. The other is the Legislative Council. It sits in Parliament House in the state capital, Adelaide.

Tom Koutsantonis

Anastasious "Tom" Koutsantonis (born 23 August 1971) is an Australian politician in the South Australian Branch of the Australian Labor Party, representing the seats of West Torrens (2002−current) and Peake (1997−2002) as a Labor member in the South Australian House of Assembly. He formerly served as Treasurer of South Australia in the Weatherill cabinet.

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