Hawkvision

Hawkvision was a short-lived subscription TV service founded by Wirtz Corporation and Chicago Blackhawks owner Bill Wirtz.[1] The service broadcast Chicago Blackhawks games. It operated in conjunction with Chicago's local version of SportsChannel, and access cost $29.95 per month.

Hawkvision
TypePay television network (sports)
AvailabilityUnited States
HeadquartersChicago, IL
OwnerWirtz Corporation
Launch date
1992
Dissolved1993

Overview

In 1992, Wirtz, who had a reputation for stubbornness and frugality,[2] ended all Blackhawks broadcast agreements with network and cable television outlets. While vilified for this decision by many Blackhawks fans, he felt that broadcasting regular home games was unfair to the team's season-ticket holders.[3] Only Blackhawks games picked up by national broadcasters (which only happened when the Blackhawks made the playoffs) were shown on basic cable (complicated further by SportsChannel America having various issues with carriage).

Hawkvision only broadcast for a short time, ending after the 1992–93 season. However, regular Blackhawk home games would not resume airing on television until the 2007–08 season after Wirtz's death. His son Rocky took over the team's operations and agreed to allow WGN-TV and Comcast SportsNet Chicago to carry those games.

Similar subscription TV services were utilized for the Montreal Canadiens and Winnipeg Jets by rightsholder TSN from 2010 through 2014.

References

  1. ^ Wood, Matt (November 21, 2007). "Shooting The Hawks". Chicago Sports Weekly. Archived from the original on December 1, 2007. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  2. ^ Associated Press (September 26, 2007). "Blackhawks Owner William Wirtz Dies". Fox News. Retrieved 2007-09-29.
  3. ^ Ziehm, Len (February 27, 2002). "All playoff games will be televised". Chicago SunTimes. Archived from the original on December 10, 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-29.
Bill Wirtz

William Wadsworth "Bill" Wirtz (October 5, 1929 – September 26, 2007) was the chief executive officer and controlling shareholder of the family-owned Wirtz Corporation. He was best known as the owner of the Chicago Blackhawks of the National Hockey League, who are part of Wirtz Corp's holdings. Wirtz also served as the Blackhawks' team president for over four decades.

Fox Major League Baseball

Fox Major League Baseball (shortened to Fox MLB and also known as Major League Baseball on Fox, MLB on Fox, or MLB on FS1) is a presentation of Major League Baseball (MLB) games produced by Fox Sports, the sports division of the Fox Broadcasting Company (Fox), since June 1, 1996. The broadcaster has aired the World Series in 1996, 1998 and every edition since 2000, and the All-Star Game in 1997, 1999, and every year since 2001. It has also aired the National League Championship Series and American League Championship Series in alternate years from 1996 to 2000, both series from 2001 to 2006, and again in alternate years since 2007, with the NLCS in even years and the ALCS in odd years. Under its current contract with MLB, Fox Sports will continue to carry MLB telecasts through at least the 2021 season, with national broadcasts on FOX and cable sports network Fox Sports 1.

Fox Sports Networks

Fox Sports Networks (FSN), formerly known as Fox Sports Net, is the collective name for a group of regional sports channels in the United States. Formed in 1996 by News Corporation, the group was acquired by The Walt Disney Company in March 2019 following its acquisition of 21st Century Fox. A condition of that acquisition imposed by the U.S. Department of Justice required Disney to sell FSN by June 18, 2019, 90 days after the completion of its acquisition. Disney subsequently sold the networks (excluding the YES Network, being reacquired by Yankee Global Enterprises) to Sinclair Broadcast Group.Each of the channels in the group carries regional broadcasts of sporting events from various professional, collegiate and high school sports teams (with broadcasts typically exclusive to each individual channel, although some are shown on multiple FSN channels within a particular team's designated market area), along with regional and national sports discussion, documentary and analysis programs.

Depending on their individual team rights, some Fox Sports Networks maintain overflow feeds available via digital cable, telco and satellite providers in their home markets, which may provide alternate programming when not used to carry game broadcasts that the main feed cannot carry due to scheduling conflicts. Fox Sports Networks is headquartered in Houston, Texas, with master control facilities based in both Houston and Los Angeles; FSN also maintains production facilities at Stage 19 at Universal Studios Florida (which formerly served as home of Nickelodeon Studios until its closure in 2005).

NHL on Fox

NHL on Fox is the branding formerly used for broadcasts of National Hockey League games that were produced by Fox Sports, and televised on the Fox network from the 1994–1995 NHL season until the 1998–1999 NHL season. Although the Fox broadcast network no longer airs league telecasts, NHL games currently air on the Fox Sports Networks in the form of game telecasts that air on a regional basis, featuring local NHL teams that each of the regional networks have respective broadcast rights to air in their designated market.

NHL on SportsChannel America

NHL on SportsChannel America was the presentation of National Hockey League broadcasts on the now defunct SportsChannel America cable television network.

Regional sports network

In the United States and Canada, a regional sports network (RSN) is a cable television channel (many of which are also distributed on direct broadcast satellite services) that presents sports programming to a local market or geographical region.

Historically, some RSNs originated as premium channels; since the 1990s, however, they have commonly been distributed through the expanded basic-programming tiers of cable and IPTV services, packaged alongside other national basic cable networks, and local broadcast stations and public, educational, and government access channels. Satellite providers often require subscribers to purchase a higher programming tier or a specialized sports tier to receive local and out-of-market regional sports networks.

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