Hawaii's 2nd congressional district

Hawaii's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Hawaii. The district encompasses all rural and most suburban areas of Oahu/Honolulu County, as well as the entire state outside of Oahu. Besides Honolulu, the district includes the counties of Kauai, Maui, Kalawao and Hawaii ("the Big Island"). The district spans 331 miles. The most populous community entirely within the district is Hilo. Major segments of the economy include tourism, ranching and agriculture, especially pineapple and sugarcane cultivation.

The district is represented by Democrat Tulsi Gabbard.

Hawaii's 2nd congressional district
Hawaii Congressional Districts, 113th Congress
Hawaii's 2nd congressional district – since January 3, 2013
(all but the green-shaded portion of Oahu)
Representative
  Tulsi Gabbard
DHonolulu
Distribution
  • 83.65% urban
  • 16.35% rural
Population (2010)699,332[1]
Median income$75,289[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+19[3]

History

When Hawaii and Alaska were admitted to the Union in 1959, both new states were granted one at-large Representative to Congress pending the next United States Census. In the reapportionment following the 1960 U.S. Census, Hawaii was entitled to a second U.S. Representative. Instead of creating two congressional districts, the state continued to elect its U.S. Representatives at-large. Two representatives were first elected in 1962 and Hawaii was first represented by two U.S. Representatives on January 2, 1963 upon the convening of the 88th Congress.

The 2nd Congressional District was created in 1971 when Hawaii began electing its representatives from districts instead of electing an at-large U.S. Representative statewide.

Political profile

Historically, the 2nd Congressional District has been the more Democratic of the state's two districts, with a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+19.

In 2004, President George W. Bush received 44 percent of the vote in this district to 56 percent for Democrat John Kerry.

In 2008, Democrat and Hawaii native Barack Obama carried this district overwhelmingly with 73 percent of the vote.[4]

In 2012, President Barack Obama carried this district by a similarly large 71 percent of the vote.[4]

In 2016, President Donald Trump received 30 percent of the vote, while his Democratic opponent and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton carried the district with 61 percent of the vote.[4]

Recent election results in presidential races

Year Office Result[5]
2000 President Al Gore 56% – George W. Bush 36%
2004 President John Kerry 56% – George W. Bush 44%
2008 President Barack Obama 73% – John McCain 25%
2012 President Barack Obama 71% – Mitt Romney 27%
2016 President Hillary Clinton 61% – Donald Trump 30%

Residency requirement

Under the U.S. Constitution, a candidate for this district only has to be a resident of Hawaii, but does not have to live in the district itself. The first non-resident to be elected to this U.S. House seat was Ed Case, a Honolulu attorney, though Case was born and raised on the Big Island of Hawaii. The home state office of the Second Congressional District is at the Prince Kuhio Federal Building near Honolulu Harbor.

List of members representing the district

Member Party Years Cong
ress(es)
Electoral history
Patsy Mink 1970s
Patsy Mink
Democratic January 3, 1971 —
January 3, 1977
92nd
93rd
94th
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Daniel Akaka as Representative
Daniel Akaka
Democratic January 3, 1977 —
May 15, 1990
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
Elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Resigned when appointed U.S. Senator.
Vacant May 15, 1990 —
September 22, 1990
101st
Patsymink
Patsy Mink
Democratic September 22, 1990 —
September 28, 2002
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
Elected to finish Akaka's term.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Died.
Re-elected posthumously in 2002.
Vacant September 28, 2002 —
November 30, 2002
Ed Case, official photo portrait color
Ed Case
Democratic November 30, 2002 —
January 3, 2003
107th Elected to finish Mink's term in the 107th Congress.
Term ended.
Vacant January 3, 2003 —
January 4, 2003
Ed Case, official photo portrait color
Ed Case
Democratic January 4, 2003 —
January 3, 2007
108th
109th
Elected to finish Mink's term in the 108th Congress.
Re-elected in 2004.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Mazie Hirono, official portrait, 112th Congress
Mazie Hirono
Democratic January 3, 2007 —
January 3, 2013
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Tulsi Gabbard, official portrait, 113th Congress
Tulsi Gabbard
Democratic January 3, 2013 —
present
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.

Election results

1970

1970 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink 91,038 100.00%
Total votes 91,038 100.0%
Democratic win (new seat)

1972

1972 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink (Incumbent) 79,856 57.08%
Republican Diana Hansen-Young 60,043 42.92%
Total votes 139,899 100.0%
Democratic hold

1974

1974 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink (Incumbent) 86,916 62.58%
Republican Carla W. Coray 51,984 37.42%
Total votes 138,900 100.0%
Democratic hold

1976

1976 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Akaka 124,116 79.51%
Republican Hank Inouye 23,917 15.32%
Independents for Godly Government Bill Penaroza 3,461 2.22%
People's Party Dexter Cate 2,408 1.54%
Libertarian Don Smith 2,197 1.41%
Total votes 156,099 100.0%
Democratic hold

1978

1978 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Akaka (Incumbent) 118,272 85.73%
Republican Charlie Isaak 15,697 11.38%
Libertarian Amelia L. Fritts 3,988 2.89%
Total votes 137,957 100.0%
Democratic hold

1980

1980 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Akaka (Incumbent) 141,477 89.90%
Libertarian Don Smith 15,903 10.10%
Total votes 157,380 100.0%
Democratic hold

1982

1982 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Akaka (Incumbent) 132,072 89.23%
Nonpartisan Gregory B. Mills 9,080 6.14%
Libertarian Amelia L. Fritts 6,856 4.63%
Total votes 148,008 100.0%
Democratic hold

1984

1984 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Akaka (Incumbent) 112,377 82.18%
Republican A.D. (Al) Shipley 20,000 14.63%
Libertarian Amelia L. Fritts 4,364 3.19%
Total votes 136,741 100.0%
Democratic hold

1986

1986 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Akaka (Incumbent) 123,830 76.05%
Republican Maria M. Hustace 35,371 21.73%
Libertarian Ken Schoolland 3,618 2.22%
Total votes 162,819 100.0%
Democratic hold

1988

1988 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Akaka (Incumbent) 144,802 88.94%
Libertarian Lloyd Jeffrey Mallan 18,006 11.06%
Total votes 162,808 100.0%
Democratic hold

1990 (Special)

1990 Hawaii's 2nd congressional district special election[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink 51,841 37.35%
Democratic Mufi Hannemann 50,164 36.14%
Democratic Ron Menor 23,629 17.02%
Republican Andy Poepoe 8,872 6.39%
Republican Stanley Monsef 2,264 1.63%
Democratic Duane A. Black 1,242 0.90%
Libertarian Lloyd Jeffrey Mallan 791 0.57%
Total votes 138,803 100.0%
Democratic hold

1990

1990 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink (Incumbent) 118,155 66.27%
Republican Andy Poepoe 54,625 30.64%
Libertarian Lloyd Jeffrey Mallan 5,508 3.09%
Total votes 178,288 100.0%
Democratic hold

1992

1992 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink (Incumbent) 131,454 72.65%
Republican Kamuela Price 40,070 22.14%
Libertarian Lloyd Jeffrey Mallan 9,431 5.21%
Total votes 180,955 100.0%
Democratic hold

1994

1994 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink (Incumbent) 124,431 70.14%
Republican Robert H. (Lopaka) Garner 42,891 24.18%
Libertarian Larry Bartley 10,074 5.68%
Total votes 177,396 100.0%
Democratic hold

1996

1996 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink (Incumbent) 109,178 60.33%
Republican Tom Pico Jr. 55,729 30.80%
Nonpartisan Nolan Crabbe 7,723 4.27%
Libertarian James M. Keefe 4,769 2.64%
Natural Law Amanda (Mandy) Toulon 3,564 1.97%
Total votes 180,963 100.0%
Democratic hold

1998

1998 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink (Incumbent) 144,254 69.40%
Republican Carol J. Douglass 50,423 24.25%
Libertarian Noreen Leilehua Chun 13,194 6.35%
Total votes 207,871 100.0%
Democratic hold

2000

2000 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink (Incumbent) 112,856 61.59%
Republican Russ Francis 65,906 35.97%
Libertarian Lawrence G.K. Duquesne 4,468 2.44%
Total votes 183,230 100.0%
Democratic hold

2002

2002 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patsy Mink (Incumbent) 100,671 56.16%
Republican Bob McDermott 71,661 39.98%
Libertarian Lloyd Jeffrey Mallan 4,719 2.63%
Natural Law Nick Bedworth 2,200 1.23%
Total votes 179,251 100.0%
Democratic hold

2002 (Special)

Hawaii's 2nd congressional district special election, November 30, 2002[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ed Case 23,576 51.44%
Democratic John Mink 16,624 36.27%
Republican John Carroll 1,933 4.22%
Republican Whitney Anderson 942 2.06%
No party 34 others 2,754 5.96%%
Total votes 46,216 100.0%
Democratic hold

2003 (Special)

Hawaii's 2nd congressional district special election, January 4, 2003[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ed Case (Incumbent) 33,002 43.24%
Democratic Matt Matsunaga 23,050 30.20%
Democratic Colleen Hanabusa 6,046 7.92%
Republican Barbara Marumoto 4,497 5.89%
Republican Bob McDermott 4,298 5.63%
No party 39 others 5,435 7.12%%
Total votes 76,328 100.0%
Democratic hold

2004

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ed Case (Incumbent) 133,317 62.77%
Republican Mike Gabbard 79,072 37.23%
Total votes 212,389 100.0%
Democratic hold

2006

2006 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mazie Hirono 106,906 61.04%
Republican Bob Hogue 68,244 38.96%
Total votes 175,150 100.0%
Democratic hold

2008

2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mazie Hirono (Incumbent) 165,748 76.06%
Republican Roger B. Evans 44,425 20.39%
Independent Shaun Stenshol 4,042 1.86%
Libertarian Lloyd Jeffrey Mallan 3,699 1.70%
Total votes 217,914 100.0%
Democratic hold

2010

2010 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[29]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mazie Hirono (Incumbent) 132,290 72.19%
Republican John W. Willoughby 46,404 25.32%
Libertarian Pat Brock 3,254 1.78%
Nonpartisan Andrew V. Von Sonn 1,310 0.72%
Total votes 183,258 100.0%
Democratic hold

2012

2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii[30]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tulsi Gabbard 168,466 80.54%
Republican Kawika Crowley 40,697 19.45%
Blank Votes 5,631 N/A
Over Votes 73 N/A
Total votes 214,867 100%
Democratic hold

2014

Hawaii's 2nd Congressional District, 2014[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tulsi Gabbard (Incumbent) 142,010 78.7%
Republican Kawika Crowley 33,630 18.6%
Libertarian Joe Kent 4,693 2.6%
Total votes 180,333 100%
Democratic hold

2016

Hawaii's 2nd Congressional District, 2016 [32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tulsi Gabbard (Incumbent) 170,848 76.23%
Republican Angela Aulani Kaaihue 39,668 17.70%
Blank votes 13,483 6.02%
Over votes 134 0.05%
Total votes 224,133 100%

Living former members from the district

As of April 2018, there are two living former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from the district. The most recent representative to die was Daniel Akaka (served 1977–1990), who died on April 6, 2018. The most recently serving representative to die was Patsy Mink (served 1971–1977, 1990–2002), who died in office on September 28, 2002.

Representative Term in office Date of birth (and age)
Ed Case 2002–2007 September 27, 1952 (age 67)
Mazie Hirono 2007–2013 November 3, 1947 (age 71)

Historical district boundaries

HI district 2-108th
2003–2013

See also

References

  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present
  1. ^ "United States Census". Retrieved 22 July 2014.
  2. ^ "My Congressional District". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  3. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c "Daily Kos Elections' presidential results by congressional district for 2016, 2012, and 2008". Daily Kos.
  5. ^ Hawaii Office of Elections: Election results separated by year. Accessed February 11, 2015.
  6. ^ 1970 Election Results
  7. ^ 1972 Election Results
  8. ^ 1974 Election Results
  9. ^ 1976 Election Results
  10. ^ 1978 Election Results
  11. ^ 1980 Election Results
  12. ^ 1982 Election Results
  13. ^ 1984 Election Results
  14. ^ 1986 Election Results
  15. ^ 1988 Election Results
  16. ^ 1990 Special Election Results
  17. ^ 1990 Election Results
  18. ^ 1992 Election Results
  19. ^ 1994 Election Results
  20. ^ 1996 Election Results
  21. ^ 1998 Election Results
  22. ^ 2000 Election Results
  23. ^ 2002 Election Results
  24. ^ 2002 Special Election Results
  25. ^ 2003 Special Election Results
  26. ^ 2004 Election Results
  27. ^ 2006 Election Results
  28. ^ 2008 Election Results
  29. ^ 2010 Election Results
  30. ^ 2012 Election Results
  31. ^ "Hawaii General Election 2014" (PDF). Hawaii Office of Elections. 2014-11-04. Retrieved 2014-12-18.
  32. ^ "PRIMARY ELECTION 2016 – State of Hawaii – Statewide". State of Hawaii Office of Elections. August 16, 2016. p. 1. Retrieved November 18, 2016.

Coordinates: 19°48′35″N 155°30′22″W / 19.80972°N 155.50611°W

1990 United States House of Representatives elections

The 1990 United States House of Representatives elections was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1990 which occurred in the middle of President George H. W. Bush's term. As in most midterm elections, the President's Republican Party lost seats to the Democratic Party, slightly increasing the Democratic majority in the chamber. It was a rare instance, however, in which both major parties lost votes to third parties such as the Libertarian Party as well as independent candidates.

2002–2003 Hawaii's 2nd congressional district special elections

There were two United States House of Representatives special elections in Hawaii's 2nd congressional district within 35 days of each other to select the successor to Democrat Patsy Mink who had died from pneumonia. The elections, held November 30, 2002 and January 4, 2003, were officially nonpartisan and each held as general elections without primaries to pick a successor for the remainder of her term in the 107th Congress and for the next term in the 108th Congress, to which Mink was posthumously re-elected. Both elections were won by Democrat Ed Case.

2003 United States House of Representatives special elections

In 2003, two special elections to fill vacancies in the House of Representatives were held. They were for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district (on January 4) and Texas's 19th congressional district (June 3). None of these congressional seats changed party hands

2003 United States elections

The 2003 United States elections, most of which were held on Tuesday, November 4, were off-year elections in which no members of the Congress were standing for election. However, there were three gubernatorial races, state legislative elections in four states, numerous citizen initiatives, mayoral races in several major cities, and a variety of local offices on the ballot.

The most high-profile race during this year was the California gubernatorial recall election: California voters replaced incumbent Governor Gray Davis with actor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

2006 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii

The 2006 congressional elections in Hawaii were held on November 4, 2006 to determine who was to represent the state of Hawaii in the United States House of Representatives for the 111th Congress. Hawaii has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii

The 2008 congressional elections in Hawaii were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who was to represent the state of Hawaii in the United States House of Representatives for the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009, until their terms of office expire on January 3, 2011. Incumbent Neil Abercrombie (D) was reelected in Hawaii's 1st congressional district. Incumbent Mazie Hirono (D) was reelected in Hawaii's 2nd congressional district.

Hawaii has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms. The election coincided with the 2008 U.S. presidential election.

2010 United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii

The 2010 congressional elections in Hawaii was held on November 4, 2010 to determine who was to represent the state of Hawaii in the United States House of Representatives for the 112th Congress from January 2011, until their terms of office expire in January 2013.

Hawaii has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms. The election coincided with the 2010 gubernatorial election.

2020 United States presidential election in Hawaii

The 2020 United States presidential election in Hawaii is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States elections in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate. Hawaii voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of Hawaii has 4 electoral votes in the Electoral College.As of September 2019, Donald Trump, Joe Walsh, Bill Weld, and Mark Sanford are the declared Republican candidates for 2020. Tulsi Gabbard, the U.S. Representative for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district, is running. A number of other Democrats are running or have expressed interest in running, and Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, Beto O’Rourke and former Vice President Joe Biden are the major declared candidates.

Bob Hogue

Robert Charles Hogue (born September 7, 1953) is an American athletic conference commissioner, author and columnist, sportscaster, and a former Republican member of the Hawaii State Senate representing the 24th district (Kailua-Kaneohe) for six years (2000–2006). He was the Republican nominee for U.S. Congress in Hawaii's 2nd congressional district, to replace Ed Case, but lost in the 2006 general election to former Lieutenant Governor Mazie Hirono. Hogue is currently the commissioner of the Pacific West Conference, a position he has held since 2007.

Bob McDermott

Bob McDermott (born August 5, 1963) is an American politician and a Republican member of the Hawaii House of Representatives since January 16, 2013 representing District 40. McDermott previously served three terms in the Hawaii House

of Representatives from 1997 until 2003, but left to run to represent Hawaii's 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives.

Brian Evans (singer)

Brian K. Evans (born May 3, 1970) is an American actor, writer, and big band singer known mostly as a crooner. He was the 2018 Republican nominee for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district.Evans' singing career began in the late 1980s and later included extended performances in Vancouver, Las Vegas, and Hawaii. After a role in a television commercial, he was hired in other acting roles in the 1990s. Evans ran for the U.S. Senate in 2004 and 2014 from Hawaii as a Democrat, before running as a Republican for the U.S. House in 2018.

Ed Case

Edward Espenett Case (born September 27, 1952) is an American Democratic politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Hawaii's 1st congressional district, which covers the urban core of Honolulu. He represented the 2nd district, which covers the rest of the state, from 2002 to 2007.

Case, a Blue Dog Democrat, first came to prominence in Hawaii as majority leader of the Hawaii State Legislature and in his 2002 campaign for governor of Hawaii.

First elected to the House of Representatives in 2002 in a special election to fill the seat of Patsy Mink, who died of pneumonia, Case represented Hawaii's 2nd congressional district until 2006, when he unsuccessfully challenged Daniel Akaka in the Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate.

In 2010 Case was one of two Democratic candidates in the special election for Hawaii's 1st congressional district. With the Democratic vote split, Republican Councilman Charles Djou's 39% of the vote earned him the seat. Case ran again in the Democratic primary for the November general election, but suspended his campaign in May. Colleen Hanabusa, Case's fellow Democrat in the special election, went on to win the primary and the general election against Djou. Case again ran for the Senate in 2012 after Daniel Akaka announced his retirement, but lost to Mazie Hirono.In July 2013 Case announced that he was joining Outrigger Enterprises Group and that his political career was "likely" over. In June 2018, Case reversed his decision and announced he would run again in Hawaii's 1st congressional district. Case won the crowded Democratic primary election in August 2018, and went on to win the general election. He took office in January 2019.

Kai Kahele

Kaiali‘i Kahele (born March 28, 1974) is an American politician and son of Gil Kahele. He is a member of the Hawaii Senate from the 1st district, serving since 2016. Kahele has sponsored 203 bills. He is a member of the Democratic Party.He is currently running for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district in 2020 against incumbent Democratic U.S. Representative and 2020 presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard.

Mazie Hirono

Mazie Keiko Hirono (; Japanese name: 広野 慶子, Hirono Keiko; born November 3, 1947) is a Japanese-born American politician serving since 2013 as the junior United States Senator from Hawaii. She is a member of the Democratic Party. Hirono served as a member of the Hawaii House of Representatives from 1981 to 1995 and as Hawaii's ninth lieutenant governor from 1994 to 2002, under Ben Cayetano. The Democratic nominee for governor of Hawaii in 2002, Hirono was defeated by Republican Linda Lingle. From 2007 to 2013, she served as a member of the United States House of Representatives for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district.

Hirono is the first elected female senator from Hawaii, the first Asian-American woman elected to the Senate, the first U.S. senator born in Japan, and the nation's first Buddhist senator. She considers herself a non-practicing Buddhist and is often cited with Hank Johnson as the first Buddhist to serve in the United States Congress. She is the third woman to be elected to Congress from Hawaii (after Patsy Mink and Pat Saiki). In 2012, Hirono was the Democratic nominee for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by the retirement of Daniel Akaka. Hirono won the election, defeating Lingle in landslide, 63% to 37%. She was sworn in on January 3, 2013, by Vice President Joe Biden. Hirono was the only person of Asian ancestry serving in the U.S. Senate from 2013 until 2017, when senators Tammy Duckworth and Kamala Harris were sworn in, representing Illinois and California, respectively. Although Brian Schatz joined the Senate a week before Hirono, following the death of Daniel Inouye, making him Hawaii's senior senator, her six years in the House of Representatives makes her the dean, or longest-serving member overall, of Hawaii's congressional delegation.

Prince Kuhio Federal Building

The Prince Kūhiō Federal Building, formally the Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole Federal Building and United States Courthouse, is the official seat of the United States federal government and its local branches of various agencies and departments in the state of Hawaiʻi. Its address is 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Honolulu, Hawaii 96850.The building was completed in 1977 with a total of 929,857 square feet (86,386.5 m2) of working space.

It houses the United States District Court for the District of Hawaii. the United States Attorney for the District of Hawaii, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (Honolulu Division), the offices of Hawaii's U.S. Senators, the offices of Hawaii's U.S. Representatives for Hawaii's 1st congressional district and Hawaii's 2nd congressional district, and branch offices of the United States Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, United States Department of Justice, Central Intelligence Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Internal Revenue Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, among other entities.The building was named after Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole, heir to the throne of the overthrown Kingdom of Hawaiʻi, who served as Republican territorial delegate to the United States Congress from 1903 through 1922.

It was built on part of the former US Army Fort Armstrong, which was named for Samuel C. Armstrong (1839–1893), son of Hawaiian missionaries.

Across Ala Moana Boulevard is the Aloha Tower at the Honolulu harbor. Other parts of Fort Armstrong became a container terminal for military supplies.The Prince Kūhiō Building was constructed to replace the aging Federal Court, Customs House and Post Office building fronting ʻIolani Palace and adjacent to Aliʻiōlani Hale which had been built in 1922 and expanded in 1931. After being mostly vacant, the old building was renovated and put up for sale. The old building was given back to the state of Hawaiʻi and was renamed the King David Kalākaua Building in December 2003.Construction of the Prince Kūhiō Federal Building was not without controversy. The General Services Administration wanted a simple tall office tower, while local architects argued for a building more appropriate to Hawaii.

Statutes provided that all buildings between the shoreline and the foot of Punchbowl Crater could not be taller than the Hawaiʻi State Capitol. The federal government, not legally limited by local statutes, defied the statutes and constructed the building as the tallest structure in the path of the capitol building's view of the shoreline. The complex includes ten stories of offices (including a penthouse level), connected by an enclosed bridge to a six-story courthouse building (including basement).The Prince Kūhiō Federal Building was designed by Joseph G.F. Farrell's firm Architects Hawaii. Other government buildings designed by the firm include the capitol building of Palau, which opened in 2006.

The building was selected for $121 million of renovations as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The plan is to make the building more efficient by upgrading its mechanical, electrical, fire-safety, and plumbing systems.

It had already been cited as an efficient building by the Energy Star program.

Traces of asbestos were discovered during the first phase.

The second phase of construction was approved in March 2011.

Special elections to the 108th United States Congress

There were two special elections to the United States House of Representatives during 2003.

On January 4, 2003, Ed Case (D) was re-elected to Hawaii's 2nd congressional district. His predecessor, Patsy Mink (D) had died September 28, 2002 and was posthumously re-elected in November. Case was elected in a November 30, 2002 special election to finish the term that ended January 3, 2003. Case was then re-elected on January 4, 2003 to the new term.

On June 3, 2003, Randy Neugebauer (R) was elected to Texas's 19th congressional district. His predecessor, Larry Combest (R) had resigned May 31, 2003 after deaths in his family.

Stop Arming Terrorists Act

The Stop Arming Terrorists Act is a proposed Act of Congress that was originally sponsored by United States Representative for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district Tulsi Gabbard and United States Senator for Kentucky Rand Paul in early 2017 to prohibit the use of United States Government funds to provide assistance to Al Qaeda, Jabhat Fateh al-Sham, and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) and to countries supporting those organizations, and for other purposes.

As November 2017, 14 other lawmakers out of 435 United States House of Representatives have co-sponsored Gabbard’s House bill. Paul’s Senate version of the bill, on the other hand, has zero cosponsors.

Tulsi Gabbard

Tulsi Gabbard (; born April 12, 1981) is an American politician and military veteran serving as the U.S. Representative for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district since 2013. A member of the Democratic Party, she became the first Samoan American and the first practicing Hindu member of Congress upon her election.

Gabbard served in the Hawaii House of Representatives from 2002 to 2004. She was the youngest woman to be elected to a state legislature when she was elected at age 21. Gabbard served in a field medical unit of the Hawaii Army National Guard in a combat zone in Iraq from 2004 to 2005 and was deployed to Kuwait from 2008 to 2009.

Gabbard was a vice chair of the Democratic National Committee from 2013 to 2016, when she resigned to endorse Senator Bernie Sanders for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination.

Gabbard is a candidate for the Democratic nomination for president of the United States in 2020. Her domestic policy platform is economically and socially progressive and has been described as "similar to Bernie Sanders … in many respects". She supports abortion rights and Medicare for All. She voted and lobbied against LGBT rights in Hawaii prior to her first tour of duty, but since 2011 Gabbard has repeatedly apologized for her earlier positions and now supports LGBT rights. Gabbard opposes military interventionism, but has called herself a "hawk" on terrorism. Her decision to meet Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and expressions of skepticism about his use of chemical weapons in the Syrian Civil War attracted controversy.

Tulsi Gabbard 2020 presidential campaign

The 2020 presidential campaign of Tulsi Gabbard, the U.S. Representative for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district, began on January 11, 2019. If Gabbard were to win, she would become the first female, Hindu, and Samoan president in American history, and would be the youngest person to ever hold the office (at the age of 39).

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.