Harry Stuhldreher

Harry Augustus Stuhldreher (October 14, 1901 – January 26, 1965) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He played quarterback at University of Notre Dame from 1922 to 1924, where he was a three-time All-American and member of the legendary "Four Horsemen" backfield. After graduating from Notre Dame, Stuhldreher played professional football briefly with the Brooklyn Horsemen/Lions in 1926. He served as the head football coach at Villanova College—now known as Villanova University—from 1925 to 1935 and at the University of Wisconsin–Madison from 1936 to 1948, compiling a career college football record of 110–87–15. Stuhldreher was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1958.

Harry Stuhldreher
Harry Stuhldreher
Biographical details
BornOctober 14, 1901
Massillon, Ohio
DiedJanuary 26, 1965 (aged 63)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1922–1924Notre Dame
1925–1926Waterbury Blues
1926Brooklyn Horsemen/Lions
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1925–1935Villanova
1936–1948Wisconsin
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1936–1950Wisconsin
Head coaching record
Overall110–87–15
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
Amos Alonzo Stagg Award (1965)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1958 (profile)

Early years and playing career

Stuhldreher was born in Massillon, Ohio, home of the Massillon Tigers professional football team. There is a story, likely apocryphal, that as a boy Stuhldreher carried gear for future University of Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne when the latter was a Tigers star.

Stuhldreher played football for both Massillon Washington High School and The Kiski School in Saltsburg, Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in 1921. At Notre Dame, he became quarterback in 1922 and in 1924 led the team to a 10–0 record, culminating in 27–10 win over Stanford in the 1925 Rose Bowl, and a national championship. He was one of the smallest quarterbacks in Notre Dame football history, standing 5' 7" tall and weighing just 151 pounds.

After graduating, Stuhldreher joined fellow member of the Four Horsemen Elmer Layden on the roster of the Brooklyn Horsemen of the first American Football League. After playing only six games of the 1926 season, the Horsemen merged with the National Football League's Brooklyn Lions franchise, which then was renamed the Horsemen. The AFL, the Brooklyn NFL franchise, and Stuhldreher's major league football career all ended with the last game of the season.

Coaching career

Stuhldreher turned to college coaching, initially also moonlighting for independent pro teams on weekends. He served for 11 years (1925–1935) as head coach at Villanova University, compiling a 65–25–9 record, and 13 years (1936–1948) as head coach and athletic director at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. During his tenure at Wisconsin, he compiled a 45–62–6 (.425) record, and the Badgers were twice the Big Ten Conference runner-up under his guidance.

Later life and honors

Leaving Wisconsin, Stuhldreher joined U.S. Steel in Pittsburgh in 1950. He died in Pittsburgh of acute pancreatitis and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Stuhldreher wrote two books, "Quarterback Play" and "Knute Rockne, Man Builder." The latter was a source for the movie Knute Rockne, All American, starring Ronald Reagan as George Gipp. Former Notre Dame star Nick Lukats played the part of Stuhldreher in this movie. Stuhldreher's wife Mary was also a writer. The couple had four sons.

Stuhldreher was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1958.

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs AP#
Villanova Wildcats (Independent) (1925–1935)
1925 Villanova 6–2–1
1926 Villanova 6–2–1
1927 Villanova 6–1
1928 Villanova 7–0–1
1929 Villanova 7–2–1
1930 Villanova 5–5
1931 Villanova 4–3–2
1932 Villanova 7–2
1933 Villanova 7–2–1
1934 Villanova 3–4–2
1935 Villanova 7–2
Villanova: 65–25–9
Wisconsin Badgers (Big Ten Conference) (1936–1948)
1936 Wisconsin 2–6 0–4 9th
1937 Wisconsin 4–3–1 2–2–1 T–4th
1938 Wisconsin 5–3 3–2 T–4th
1939 Wisconsin 1–6–1 0–5–1 9th
1940 Wisconsin 4–4 3–3 T–4th
1941 Wisconsin 3–5 3–3 5th
1942 Wisconsin 8–1–1 4–1 2nd 3
1943 Wisconsin 1–9 1–6 8th
1944 Wisconsin 3–6 2–4 7th
1945 Wisconsin 3–4–2 2–3–1 6th
1946 Wisconsin 4–5 2–5 8th
1947 Wisconsin 5–3–1 3–2–1 2nd
1948 Wisconsin 2–7 1–5 9th
Wisconsin: 45–62–6 26–45–4
Total: 110–87–15

External links

  • Harry Stuhldreher at the College Football Hall of Fame
  • Harry Stuhldreher at Pro-Football-Reference.com
  • Hogrogian, John (1982). "The Hartford Blues Part I" (PDF). Coffin Corner. Professional Football Researchers Association. 4 (8): 1–5. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-11-27.
  • Harry Stuhldreher at Find a Grave Edit this at Wikidata
1924 College Football All-America Team

The 1924 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1924. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1924 season are (1) Walter Camp, whose selections were published in Collier's Weekly, (2) Football World magazine (FW), (3) the All-America Board (AAB), (4) the International News Service (INS), (5) Liberty magazine, and (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA).

The only unanimous All-American in 1924 was halfback Red Grange of Illinois, known as "The Galloping Ghost" and who in 2008 was named by ESPN as the best college football player of all time. The consensus All-Americans recognized by the NCAA for 1924 also include tackle Ed Weir, who was later named the 19th best athlete in Nebraska history, and three of Notre Dame's legendary Four Horseman (halfback Jim Crowley, quarterback Harry Stuhldreher, and fullback Elmer Layden).

1924 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1924 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame in the 1924 college football season. Coached by Knute Rockne and featuring the "Four Horsemen" backfield of Harry Stuhldreher, Don Miller, Jim Crowley, and Elmer Layden, Notre Dame won all ten games, including a victory over Stanford in the Rose Bowl.

The team was recognized as the consensus national champion, receiving retroactive national championship honors from the Berryman QPRS system, Billingsley Report, Boand System, Dickinson System, College Football Researchers Association, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, Poling System, and Jeff Sagarin.The 1925 Rose Bowl was Notre Dame's last bowl appearance until the 1969 season; the Fighting Irish played their home games at Cartier Field.

1927 Villanova Wildcats football team

The 1927 Villanova Wildcats football team represented the Villanova University during the 1927 college football season. The head coach was Harry Stuhldreher, coaching his third season with the Wildcats. The team played their home games at Villanova Stadium in Villanova, Pennsylvania.

1928 Villanova Wildcats football team

The 1928 Villanova Wildcats football team represented the Villanova University during the 1928 college football season. The head coach was Harry Stuhldreher, coaching his fourth season with the Wildcats. The team played their home games at Villanova Stadium in Villanova, Pennsylvania.

1929 Villanova Wildcats football team

The 1929 Villanova Wildcats football team represented the Villanova University during the 1929 college football season. The head coach was Harry Stuhldreher, coaching his fifth season with the Wildcats. The team played their home games at Villanova Stadium in Villanova, Pennsylvania.

1930 Villanova Wildcats football team

The 1930 Villanova Wildcats football team represented the Villanova University during the 1930 college football season. The head coach was Harry Stuhldreher, coaching his sixth season with the Wildcats. The team played their home games at Villanova Stadium in Villanova, Pennsylvania.

1931 Villanova Wildcats football team

The 1931 Villanova Wildcats football team represented the Villanova University during the 1931 college football season. The head coach was Harry Stuhldreher, coaching his seventh season with the Wildcats. The team played their home games at Villanova Stadium in Villanova, Pennsylvania.

1932 Villanova Wildcats football team

The 1932 Villanova Wildcats football team represented the Villanova University during the 1932 college football season. The head coach was Harry Stuhldreher, coaching his seventh season with the Wildcats. The team played their home games at Villanova Stadium in Villanova, Pennsylvania.

1933 Villanova Wildcats football team

The 1933 Villanova Wildcats football team represented the Villanova University during the 1933 college football season. The head coach was Harry Stuhldreher, coaching his ninth season with the Wildcats. The team played their home games at Villanova Stadium in Villanova, Pennsylvania.

1934 Villanova Wildcats football team

The 1934 Villanova Wildcats football team represented the Villanova University during the 1934 college football season. The head coach was Harry Stuhldreher, coaching his tenth season with the Wildcats. The team played their home games at Villanova Stadium in Villanova, Pennsylvania.

1935 Villanova Wildcats football team

The 1935 Villanova Wildcats football team represented the Villanova University during the 1935 college football season. The head coach was Harry Stuhldreher, coaching his eleventh season with the Wildcats. The team played their home games at Villanova Stadium in Villanova, Pennsylvania.

1936 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1936 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1936 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 2–6 record (0–4 against conference opponents) and finished in ninth place in the Big Ten Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his first year as Wisconsin's head coach.Fullback Eddie Jankowski was selected as the team's most valuable player. John Golemgeske was the team captain.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium, which had a capacity of 32,700. During the 1936 season, the average attendance at home games was 19,117.

1938 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1938 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1938 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 5–3 record (3–2 against conference opponents) and finished in fifth place in the Big Ten Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his third year as Wisconsin's head coach.Fullback Howard Weiss was selected by the International News Service as a first-team player on the 1938 College Football All-America Team. He also won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the most valuable player in the Big Ten. He also finished sixth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy and was also selected as Wisconsin's most valuable player. Ralph Moeller was the team captain. Howard Weiss and center Jack Murray were selected by the Associated Press and United Press as first-team players on the 1938 All-Big Ten Conference football team.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium, which had a capacity of 36,000. During the 1938 season, the average attendance at home games was 31,731.

1939 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1939 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1939 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 1–6–1 record (0–5–1 against conference opponents) and finished in ninth place in the Big Ten Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his fourth year as Wisconsin's head coach.Fullback George Paskvan was selected by the Associated Press and United Press as a first-team player on the 1939 All-Big Ten Conference football team. He was also selected as Wisconsin's most valuable player. Ralph Moeller was the team captain.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium, which had a capacity of 36,000. During the 1939 season, the average attendance at home games was 23,726.

1941 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1941 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1941 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 3–5 record (3–3 against conference opponents) and finished in fifth place in the Big Ten Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his sixth year as Wisconsin's head coach.Wisconsin players led the Big Ten in rushing (Pat Harder, 443 rushing yards), passing (Len Seelinger, 419 passing yards), receiving (Dave Schreiner, 249 receiving yards), and scoring (Harder, 58 points). Schreiner was selected by the Associated Press (AP) as a first-team All-American. Schreiner and Harder both received first-team All-Big Ten honors. Harder received the team's most valuable player award. Quarterback Tom Farris was the team captain.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1941 season, the average attendance at home games was 26,212.

1943 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1943 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1943 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 1–9 record (1–6 against conference opponents) and finished in eighth place in the Big Ten Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his eighth year as Wisconsin's head coach.Center Joe Keenan received the team's most valuable player award. Keenan was also the team captain. Ray Dooney led the Big Ten with an average of 39.0 yards per punt.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1943 season, the average attendance at home games was 14,374.

1945 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1945 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1945 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 3–4–2 record (2–3–1 against conference opponents) and finished in sixth place in the Big Ten Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his 10th year as Wisconsin's head coach. The team led the Big Ten with an average of 310 yards of total offense per game.Don Kindt tied for the lead in the Big Ten with 36 points scored, and Rex Johns led the conference with an average of 40.8 yards per punt. Tackle Clarence Esser received the team's most valuable player award. Esser also received first-team honors from the Associated Press on the 1945 All-Big Ten Conference football team. Jack Mead was the team captain.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1945 season, the average attendance at home games was 32,666.

1948 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1948 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1948 Big Nine Conference football season. The team compiled a 2–7 record (1–5 against conference opponents) and finished in last place in the Big Nine Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his 13th and final year as Wisconsin's head coach. The team averaged 258.6 yards per game of total offense, 200.6 yards per game by rushing, and 58.0 yards by passing.The team's statistical leaders included Ben Bendrick with 327 rushing yards, Bob Petruska with 125 passing yards, Jim Embach with 92 receiving yards, and Wally Dreyer with 24 points scored. Center Red Wilson received the team's most valuable player award for the second consecutive year. Wilson also received second-team honors from the International News Service on the 1948 All-Big Nine Conference football team. Wally Dreyer was the team captain.At the annual Minnesota–Wisconsin football rivalry game held on November 20, 1948, Paul Bunyan's Axe was introduced as a trophy to be awarded to the winner. Minnesota won the 1948 game, 16-0.On December 11, 1948, four days before a student referendum on whether he should keep his job, and in the face of "Goodbye Harry" signs, Harry Stuhldreher resigned as Wisconsin's head football coach, though he retained his job as athletic director.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1948 season, the average attendance at home games was 44,167.

Four Horsemen (American football)

The Four Horsemen of Notre Dame comprised a group of American football players at the University of Notre Dame under coach Knute Rockne. They were the backfield of Notre Dame's 1924 football team. The players that made up this group were Harry Stuhldreher, Don Miller, Jim Crowley, and Elmer Layden.In 1924, a nickname coined by sportswriter Grantland Rice and the actions of a student publicity aide transformed the Notre Dame backfield of Stuhldreher, Crowley, Miller, and Layden into one of the most noted groups of collegiate athletes in football history, the Four Horsemen of Notre Dame.Quarterback Harry Stuhldreher, left halfback Jim Crowley, right halfback Don Miller, and fullback Elmer Layden had run rampant through Irish opponents' defenses since coach Knute Rockne devised the lineup in 1922 during their sophomore season. During the three-year tenure of the Four Horsemen, Notre Dame lost only two games; one each in 1922 and 1923, both to Nebraska in Lincoln before packed houses.

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