Harry Schafer

Harry C. Schafer (August 14, 1846 – February 28, 1935) was a professional baseball player who played for eight seasons in Major League Baseball. He played for the Boston Red Stockings in the National Association for five seasons, and remained with the franchise for three additional years when it joined the National League in 1876 as the Boston Red Caps. He played third base for much of his career.

Harry Schafer
Harry Schafer
Third baseman
Born: August 14, 1846
Philadelphia
Died: February 28, 1935 (aged 88)
Philadelphia
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 5, 1871, for the Boston Red Stockings
Last MLB appearance
August 31, 1878, for the Boston Red Caps
MLB statistics
Batting average.271
Hits449
Runs batted in215
Teams
  National Association of Base Ball Players
Philadelphia Athletics (1868–1870)
  League Player
Boston Red Stockings / Red Caps (1871–1878)
Career highlights and awards

Career

In the National Association, Schafer was a durable player who played in every game in the Red Stockings' first four seasons, earning at least a share of the league lead in games played in 1873 and 1874.[1] Schafer hit .288 in 1872, and had an above average fielding percentage.[1] He was a member of the Red Stockings teams that won four consecutive National Association championships from 1872 to 1875.[2]

While playing for the renamed Red Caps in 1876, the first year of the National League, Schafer again led the league in games played.[1] He played in only half of the Red Caps' games in 1877, and was moved to right field for the season, but was nevertheless part of a team that won the National League championship.[3] In his final season, 1878, he played in only two games for a Red Caps team that won a second consecutive league championship.[4] Schafer had a career batting average of .271,[1] and was a part of six championship teams in his eight seasons in the majors.[2][3][4]

According to the Sporting News's 2008 Complete Baseball Record Book, he is credited with recording four outfield assists in an 1877 game, a National League record.[5] The accuracy of this record has been called into question by statisticians.[6] Modern sources, including those on the official website of Major League Baseball, only credit Schafer with a single outfield assist for the 1877 season and four outfield assists for his entire career.[7]

Schafer died on February 28, 1935 at the age of 88 in Philadelphia.

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Harry Schafer Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com . Sports Reference, LLC. Retrieved September 10, 2011.
  2. ^ a b "Boston Red Stockings Team History & Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference.com . Sports Reference, LLC. Retrieved 2008-10-19.
  3. ^ a b "1877 Boston Red Caps Statistics and Roster". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference, LLC. Retrieved 2008-10-19.
  4. ^ a b "1878 Boston Red Caps Statistics and Roster". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference, LLC. Retrieved 2008-10-19.
  5. ^ "The 2008 Complete Baseball Record Book — Regular Season" (PDF). Sporting News. 2008-03-05. p. 77. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 29, 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-19.
  6. ^ "Harry Schafer from the Chronology". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on 2011-06-04. Retrieved 2008-10-19.
  7. ^ "Harry Schafer". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media, L.P. Retrieved 2008-10-19.

External links

Records
Preceded by
Phonney Martin
Oldest recognized verified living baseball player
May 24, 1933 – February 28, 1935
Succeeded by
George Wright
1871 Boston Red Stockings season

The 1871 Boston Red Stockings season was the inaugural season of the franchise. They were formed in 1871 by Boston businessman and Ashburnham native Ivers Whitney Adams. The team was composed of former players of the defunct Cincinnati Red Stockings franchise, who were brought to Boston and kept the name with them. Led and managed by baseball pioneer Harry Wright, the new Boston team would join the newly formed National Association of Professional Base Ball Players for the 1871 season and finish the year in third place with a record of 20–10.

Pitcher Al Spalding started all 31 of the Red Stockings' games and led the NA with 19 wins. Catcher Cal McVey finished second in the league batting race with a .431 average. From this team, Harry Wright, Al Spalding, and shortstop George Wright have all been elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

1872 Boston Red Stockings season

The 1872 Boston Red Stockings season was the second season of the franchise. They won the National Association championship.

Managed by Harry Wright, Boston finished with a record of 39–8 to win the pennant by 7.5 games. Pitcher Al Spalding started all 48 of the Red Stockings' games and led the NA with 38 wins. Second baseman Ross Barnes won the league batting title with a .430 batting average. Harry Wright, Al Spalding, and shortstop George Wright have all been elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

1873 Boston Red Stockings season

The 1873 Boston Red Stockings season was the third season of the franchise. They won their second consecutive National Association championship.

Managed by Harry Wright, Boston finished with a record of 43–16 to win the pennant by 4 games. Pitcher Al Spalding started 54 of the Red Stockings' games and led the NA with 41 wins. Second baseman Ross Barnes won the league batting title with a .431 batting average, and catcher Deacon White topped the circuit with 77 runs batted in.

Harry Wright, Al Spalding, first baseman Jim O'Rourke, and shortstop George Wright have all been elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

1874 Boston Red Stockings season

The 1874 Boston Red Stockings season was the fourth season of the franchise. They won their third consecutive National Association championship.

Managed by Harry Wright, Boston finished with a record of 52–18 to win the pennant by 7.5 games. Pitcher Al Spalding started 69 of the Red Stockings' games and led the NA with 52 wins. Outfielder Cal McVey led the league with 71 runs batted in, and he paced the Boston offense which scored more runs than any other team.

Harry Wright, Al Spalding, first baseman Jim O'Rourke, catcher Deacon White, and shortstop George Wright have all been elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

1875 Boston Red Stockings season

The 1875 Boston Red Stockings season was the fifth season of the Boston Red Stockings franchise. They won their fourth consecutive National Association championship.

Managed by Harry Wright, Boston finished with a record of 71–8 to win the pennant by 15 games. Pitcher Al Spalding started 62 of the Red Stockings' games and led the NA with 54 wins. Catcher Deacon White (.367), second baseman Ross Barnes (.364), and first baseman Cal McVey (.355) finished 1–2–3 in the league's batting race. McVey paced the circuit with 87 runs batted in, and outfielder Jim O'Rourke had the most home runs, with 6. The Boston offense scored more runs than any other team in the NA. According to the FiveThirtyEight ELO rating system, they are the greatest team of all time. [1]

Harry Wright, Al Spalding, Jim O'Rourke, and shortstop George Wright have all been elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

This was the last season of the Association, which dissolved at the end of the year. The Red Stockings club would join the new National League in 1876.

1876 Boston Red Caps season

The 1876 Boston Red Caps season was the sixth season of the franchise. With the dissolution of the National Association, the Boston team joined the brand new National League. The team name was changed to the Boston Red Caps to avoid confusion with the new Cincinnati Red Stockings team. Some of the players from the previous year's team defected to other ballclubs, so the team finished further down in the standings this season.

1877 Boston Red Caps season

The 1877 Boston Red Caps season was the seventh season of the franchise. Arthur Soden became the new owner of the franchise, who won their first ever National League pennant.

1878 Boston Red Caps season

The 1878 Boston Red Caps season was the eighth season of the franchise. The Red Caps won their second straight National League pennant.

1935 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1935 throughout the world.

Atlanta Braves all-time roster

The Atlanta Braves are a National League ballclub (1966–present) previously located in Milwaukee 1953–1965 (Milwaukee Braves) and in Boston 1871–1952. The Boston teams are sometimes called Boston Red Stockings 1871–1876, Boston Red Caps 1876–1882, Boston Beaneaters 1883–1906, Boston Doves 1907–1910, Boston Rustlers 1911, Boston Braves 1912–1935, Boston Bees 1936–1940, Boston Braves 1941–1952. Here is a list of all their players in regular season games beginning 1871.

Bold identifies members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Italics identify players with uniform numbers retired by the team (Atlanta).

Bill Nicholson (baseball)

William Beck "Swish" Nicholson (December 11, 1914 – March 8, 1996) was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1936), Chicago Cubs (1939–1948) and Philadelphia Phillies (1949–1953). A native of Chestertown, Maryland, where he attended Washington College, he batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

In 1944, Nicholson received an intentional walk with the bases loaded. He is listed as one of only six players in major league history to do it. The others are Abner Dalrymple (1881), Nap Lajoie (1901), Del Bissonette (1928), Barry Bonds (1998) and Josh Hamilton (2008).

George Wright (sportsman)

George Wright (January 28, 1847 – August 21, 1937) was an American shortstop in professional baseball. He played for the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings, the first fully professional team, when he was the game's best player. He then played for the Boston Red Stockings, helping the team win six league championships from 1871 to 1878. His older brother Harry Wright managed both Red Stockings teams and made George his cornerstone. George was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1937. After arriving in Boston, he also entered the sporting goods business. There he continued in the industry, assisting in the development of golf.

List of 19th-century baseball players

This is a list of 19th-century baseball players who have a biographic article.

List of Major League Baseball annual fielding errors leaders

The following is a list of annual leaders in fielding errors in Major League Baseball (MLB), with separate lists for the American League and the National League. The list also includes several professional leagues and associations that were never part of MLB.

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

Herman Long is the all-time leader in errors, committing 1,096 in his career. Long and Billy Shindle hold the record for most fielding errors in a season, with Long committing 122 errors in 1889, and Shindle committing 122 errors the following year in 1890. Adrián Beltré is the active leader in fielding errors, leading the league once in 1999.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a third baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base — the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in succession to score a run. In the scoring system used to record defensive plays, the third baseman is assigned the number '5'.

The third baseman requires good reflexes in reacting to batted balls, as he or she is often the closest infielder (roughly 90–120 feet) to the batter. The third base position requires a strong and accurate arm, as the third baseman often makes long throws to first base. The third baseman sometimes must throw quickly to second base in time to start a double play. The third baseman must also field fly balls in fair and foul territory.

Arlie Latham is the all-time leader in errors committed as a third baseman with 822 career. Latham is the only third baseman to commit more than 700 or 800 career errors. Billy Nash is second all-time and the only other third baseman to commit more than 600 errors.

List of Major League Baseball players (Sa–Se)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active.

List of Major League Baseball umpires

The following is a list of major league baseball umpires. The list includes umpires who worked in any of four 19th century major leagues (American Association, National Association, Players' League, Union Association), one defunct 20th century major league (Federal League), the currently active Major League Baseball, or either of its leagues (American League, National League) when they maintained separate umpiring staffs.

Phonney Martin

Alphonse Case "Phonney" Martin (August 4, 1845 – May 24, 1933) was an American Major League Baseball baseball player who played two seasons in the National Association from 1872 to 1873.

Trace (band)

Trace was a Dutch progressive rock trio founded by Rick van der Linden in 1974 after leaving Ekseption. They released three albums before merging back into Ekseption.

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