Harry Gilmer

Harry Vincent Gilmer Jr. (April 14, 1926 – August 20, 2016) was an American football halfback and quarterback in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins and Detroit Lions. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1993.

Harry Gilmer
refer to caption
Gilmer on a 1948 Bowman football card
No. 12, 52
Position:Quarterback
Halfback
Defensive back
Personal information
Born:April 14, 1926
Birmingham, Alabama
Died:August 20, 2016 (aged 90)
near St. Louis, Missouri
Career information
College:Alabama
NFL Draft:1948 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Passing yards:3,786
Rushing yards:923
Interceptions:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life

Gilmer was born in Birmingham, Alabama, where he attended and played high school football at Woodlawn High School.[2] Gilmer often utilized the technique of leaping high into the air to pass the ball because, as a child, he often played pickup games with teammates who were much older and thus taller than he was; Gilmer was then one of the first players to popularize the "jump pass" when he continued using the technique at the collegiate level.[3]

College career

After high school, Gilmer played college football at the University of Alabama, where he was the left halfback from 1944 to 1947. As a freshman, he was 8 for 8 in passing attempts during a loss against Duke University in the Sugar Bowl.[2] Gilmer's best year was his sophomore season, when he led the nation in touchdown passes–thirteen–and he ran for nine touchdowns. He had 79 rushing attempts with an average gain of 7.0 yards and a passing percentage of .648 on 88 attempts. His total offense, 1,457 yards, was second in the nation.[2] Gilmer also spent time as a punter and kickoff returner and, in his junior year, he returned 37 punts; his average, 14.5 yards, led the nation.[2] During that season, Gilmer led Alabama to the 1946 Rose Bowl, where they beat the University of Southern California 34–14. In his career Gilmer passed for 26 touchdowns and ran for 24. He passed for 2,894 yards and rushed for 1,673. His punting average was 36.4 yards. He averaged 28.7 yards on kickoff returns, 13.5 on punt returns.[2]

Professional career

Gilmer was drafted as the first overall pick in the 1948 NFL Draft by the Washington Redskins, where he played from 1948 to 1954. He then was traded to the Detroit Lions for Bert Zagers and Bob Trout, where he played in 1955 and 1956.

Later life and death

After retiring from football, Gilmer began coaching, and was the head coach of the Lions from 1965 to 1966.[2] Gilmer was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1973[1] and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1993. In 1999, Sports Illustrated named him the 37th greatest Alabama sports figure.[4] Gilmer died on August 20, 2016, at the age of 90.[5] Until his death, he lived in St. Louis[1] along with his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Harry Gilmer's Alabama Sports HOF Profile". Alabama Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved August 15, 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Harry Gilmer". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved August 14, 2008.
  3. ^ Groom, 2000, p. 79.
  4. ^ "The 50 Greatest Alabama Sports Figures". Sports Illustrated. December 27, 1999. Archived from the original on July 18, 2003. Retrieved August 15, 2008.
  5. ^ Hurt, Cecil (August 20, 2016). "Harry Gilmer was a Tide superstar". Tuscaloosa News. Retrieved April 8, 2017.

Sources

  • Groom, Winston. The Crimson Tide – An Illustrated History. Tuscaloosa: The University of Alabama Press, 2000. ISBN 0-8173-1051-7.

External links

1944 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1944 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1944 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 50th overall and 11th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his 13th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery. They finished the season with a record of five wins, two losses and two ties (5–2–2 overall, 3–1–2 in the SEC) and with a loss in the Sugar Bowl against Duke.

After a tie against LSU to open the season, Alabama then defeated both Howard and Millsaps before they dueled Tennessee to a scoreless tie in the fourth week. The Crimson Tide then defeated Kentucky before they suffered their only regular season loss against Georgia. Alabama then closed the season with wins over both Ole Miss and Mississippi State and secured a position in the Sugar Bowl where they lost to Duke.

The 1944 squad marked the return of football at Alabama after a one-year hiatus for the 1943 season due to the effects of World War II. However as the war effort was ongoing at that time, the 1944 team was composed of players who were either too young and/or physically unable to enlist in the military. As the squad was generally smaller than both previous Alabama squads and than many they competed against, coach Thomas called this and the 1945 team the "War Babies."

1945 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1945 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1945 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 51st overall and 12th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his 14th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery. They finished with a perfect season (10–0 overall, 6–0 in the SEC) and with a victory in the Rose Bowl over USC. This team was the second season of the "War Babies" as coined by head coach Thomas.The Crimson Tide opened the season on the road with a victory over Keesler AAF after Jackson Army Air Base canceled their game at Denny Stadium. Alabama then defeated LSU in Baton Rouge before their first home win of the season at the Cramton Bowl over South Carolina. After victories over both Tennessee and Georgia at Legion Field, the Crimson Tide routed both Kentucky and Vanderbilt on the road to extend their record to 7–0. They then closed the season with a pair of games at Denny Stadium where they defeated the Pensacola NAS and Mississippi State to complete an undefeated regular season. One month later, Alabama won the Rose Bowl over USC to finish the season undefeated.

The 1945 season was the fourth perfect season in Alabama history, following the perfect seasons of 1925, 1930 and 1934. However, Alabama did not win the national championship in 1945; that honor went to the Army Cadets team that went 9–0 and outscored its opponents by a 412–46 margin. The Crimson Tide finished second in the AP poll behind the Cadets.

1945 All-SEC football team

The 1945 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1945 college football season. Alabama won the conference title.

1945 College Football All-America Team

The 1945 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1945. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1945 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (6) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (7) the International News Service (INS), (8) Look magazine, (9) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA) and (10) the Sporting News.

1945 Sugar Bowl

The 1945 Sugar Bowl, part of the 1944 bowl game season, took place on January 1, 1945, at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. The competing teams were the Alabama Crimson Tide, representing the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and the Duke Blue Devils, representing the Southern Conference (SoCon). Duke won the game 29–26.

1946 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1946 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1946 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 52nd overall and 13th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his 15th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery. They finished with a record of seven wins and four losses (7–4 overall, 4–3 in the SEC).

After the Crimson Tide opened the season with four consecutive victories over Furman, Tulane, South Carolina and Southwestern Louisiana, Alabama's 14-game winning streak was snapped when they lost to Tennessee 12–0. One week later, the Crimson Tide faced off against Kentucky and their young new coach, Bear Bryant, and won by a score of 21–7, before they lost consecutive games to Georgia and LSU. Alabama then closed the season with a victory over Vanderbilt, a loss to Boston College in their first game ever played in New England, and an upset victory over Mississippi State on homecoming in the season finale.

Over the course of the season, Frank Thomas was riddled with health issues that ultimately led to his resignation as head coach. In January 1947, Harold Drew was named as the 17th head coach of the Crimson Tide.

1946 All-SEC football team

The 1946 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1946 college football season. Georgia and Tennessee shared the conference title.

1946 Rose Bowl

The 1946 Rose Bowl, played on January 1, 1946, was a college football bowl game, the 32nd Rose Bowl Game, between the Crimson Tide of the University of Alabama and the Trojans of the University of Southern California. The Tide defeated the underdog Trojans 34–14. It was Alabama’s sixth and final trip to the Rose Bowl and Coach Thomas' final bowl trip as a coach.

1947 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1947 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1947 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 53rd overall and 14th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished with a record of eight wins and three losses (8–3 overall, 5–2 in the SEC) and with a loss in the Sugar Bowl.

After the Crimson Tide opened the season with a victory over Mississippi Southern, Alabama lost consecutive. games against Tulane and Vanderbilt to open the season 1–2. However, the Crimson Tide rebounded to win their final seven games against Duquesne, Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Georgia Tech, LSU and Miami. Alabama then lost to Texas in the Sugar Bowl to finish the season 8–3.

The 1947 season also marked the first for Harold Drew as head coach for the Crimson Tide. Drew was hired as the replacement for long-time head coach Frank Thomas after he resigned his post due to personal health conditions in January 1947.

1947 All-SEC football team

The 1947 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1947 college football season. Ole Miss won the conference.

1965 Detroit Lions season

The 1965 Detroit Lions season was the 36th season in franchise history. Harry Gilmer replaced George Wilson as the Lions head coach. The Lions failed to improve on their 1964 record of 7–5–2, finishing at 6–7–1.

Gilmer (surname)

Gilmer is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Alexander Gilmer (1829–1906), sawmill owner

Dixie Gilmer (1901–1954), U.S. Representative from Oklahoma

Elizabeth Gilmer (1880–1960), New Zealand social worker, educationist and horticulturist

Elizabeth Meriwether Gilmer (1861—1951), American columnist better known as Dorothy Dix

Dr. George Gilmer, Sr. (1700–1757), mayor of Williamsburg, Virginia

George Rockingham Gilmer (1790–1859), American politician

Harry Gilmer (born 1926), College Football Hall of Fame member and National Football League player

Jeremy Francis Gilmer, (1818–83), American soldier, Chief Engineer of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War

John Adams Gilmer (1805–1868), American politician and brother of Jeremy Gilmer

Thomas Walker Gilmer (1802–1844), American statesman

William Gilmer (died 1955), American Naval officer and Governor of Guam

List of Alabama Crimson Tide players in the College Football Hall of Fame

The Alabama Crimson Tide college football team competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and represents the University of Alabama in the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The College Football Hall of Fame was established in 1951 to honor the careers of selected student-athletes who have competed in college football as either a player or coach. Since its inaugural class that year, Alabama has had 23 persons elected to the Hall of Fame as either a player or coach of the Crimson Tide.The first Alabama inductees into the Hall of Fame were Don Hutson and Frank Thomas as part of the inaugural class in 1951. The most recent inductee was Derrick Thomas as part of the 2014 class.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide players in the NFL draft

The University of Alabama Crimson Tide football team has had 355 players drafted into the National Football League (NFL) since the league began holding drafts in 1936. This includes 61 players taken in the first round and two overall number one picks, Harry Gilmer in the 1948 NFL draft and Joe Namath in the 1965 AFL draft. 29former Alabama players have been selected to a Pro Bowl, 31 have won a championship with their respective teams and eight have been elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL draft. The draft rules were last updated in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl). Prior to the merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues held a multiple-round "common draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the common draft became the NFL draft.

List of Detroit Lions head coaches

The Detroit Lions are a professional American football team based in Detroit, Michigan. They are currently a member of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The franchise has had a total of 27 head coaches in team history, which includes its existence as the Portsmouth (Ohio) Spartans (1930–1933). In the 1934 NFL season, the franchise moved to Detroit and changed their name to the Lions.

George "Potsy" Clark is the only coach to have more than one tenure. Three different coaches have won NFL championships with the team: Potsy Clark in 1935, Buddy Parker in 1952 and 1953, and George Wilson in 1957. Wayne Fontes is the all-time leader in games coached and wins, and Clark leads all coaches in winning percentage with .679 (with at least one full season coached). John Karcis is statistically the worst coach the Lions have had as he never won a game. Karcis is followed by Marty Mornhinweg with a winning percentage of .156.

Of the 27 Lions coaches, two have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame: Dutch Clark and Joe Schmidt. Gus Dorais was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1954. Several former players have been head coach for the Lions, including Dutch Edwards, Buddy Parker, Harry Gilmer, Joe Schmidt, and Dick Jauron. The current head coach of the Lions is Matt Patricia, who was hired on February 5, 2018.

List of Detroit Lions starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Lions.

List of Washington Redskins first-round draft picks

In American football, the Washington Redskins joined the National Football League in 1932 as the Boston Braves. In 1933, the name was changed to the Boston Redskins, and finally, in 1937 the Redskins moved to Washington, D.C. The Redskins' first selection as an NFL team was Riley Smith, a blocking back from Alabama. The team's most-recent first-round selection was Jonathan Allen, a defensive lineman from Alabama.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as the "NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.The Redskins have selected number one overall twice: Harry Gilmer and Ernie Davis. The team has also selected number two overall three times and number three overall five times. The Redskins have selected players from the University of Alabama four times, the University of Miami three times, and Penn State University three times. Four eventual Hall of Famers were selected by the Redskins in the first round: Sammy Baugh, Darrell Green, Art Monk, and Charley Taylor.Two Washington Redskins first-round draft picks have died during their football careers. The first was Ernie Davis, who was chosen as the first overall pick in 1962. After being traded to the Cleveland Browns for Bobby Mitchell and Leroy Jackson, Davis was diagnosed with leukemia and died before playing a game with the Browns. The other was Sean Taylor, the Redskins' first round pick in 2004, who was fatally shot in November 2007 during his fourth season with the team.

List of Washington Redskins starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League, and its predecessors the Boston Braves (1932) and Boston Redskins (1933–1936). The Washington Redskins franchise was founded in Boston, Massachusetts as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The name was changed the following year to the Redskins. For the 1937 NFL season, the franchise moved to Washington, D.C., where it remains based.Of the 50 Redskins starting quarterbacks, two have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame: Sammy Baugh and Sonny Jurgensen.

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