Harry Ebding

Harry Joseph Ebding (September 12, 1906 – September 11, 1980) was a professional American football End in the National Football League (NFL). He played seven seasons for the Portsmouth Spartans (1931–1933) and the Detroit Lions (1934–1937). He was named All-Pro in 1933.

Harry Ebding
Position:End
Personal information
Born:September 12, 1906
Walla Walla, Washington
Died:September 11, 1980 (aged 73)
Santa Clara County, California
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:199 lb (90 kg)
Career information
High school:Walla Walla (WA)
College:Saint Mary's (CA)
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
1930 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1930 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1930 college football season. The organizations selecting teams in 1934 included the Associated Press (AP), the Newspaper Enterprise Association, and the United Press (UP).

1930 College Football All-America Team

The 1930 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1930. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1930 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and (7) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA).

1930 Saint Mary's Gaels football team

The 1930 Saint Mary's Gaels football team was an American football team that represented Saint Mary's College of California during the 1930 college football season. In their tenth season under head coach Slip Madigan, the Gaels compiled an 8–1 record, shut out five of nine opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 168 to 31. The Gaels' victories included a 21–6 besting of UCLA, a 20–12 besting of Fordham, and a 7–6 victory over Oregon. The lone setback was a 7–6 loss to California.End Harry Ebding was selected by both the Associated Press and the United Press as first-team player on the 1930 All-Pacific Coast football team.

1933 All-Pro Team

The 1933 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1933 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press, Red Grange for Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB).

1934 All-Pro Team

The 1934 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1934 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB) based on the composite view of the coaches of 10 NFL teams and a half dozen NFL officials, Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Five players were selected as first-team All-Pro players by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears halfback Beattie Feathers; Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1934 Detroit Lions season

The 1934 Detroit Lions season was the fifth season in franchise history. It was the first season the team played in Detroit; the franchise had previously played as the Portsmouth Spartans in Portsmouth, Ohio, a city with a population of approximately 40,000. Under head coach Potsy Clark, the Lions won their first ten games (the first seven shut outs) before losing three straight games to end the season. They finished in second place in the NFL Western Division behind the undefeated Chicago Bears.

Three Lions ranked among the NFL leaders in rushing yardage: Dutch Clark with 763 yards (third), Ernie Caddel with 528 yards (fifth), and Ace Gutowsky with 517 yards (seventh). Two Lions also ranked among the league leaders in points scored: Dutch Clark with 73 points (second) and Glenn Presnell with 63 points (third). Clark also led the NFL with 1,146 yards of total offense and ranked among the league leaders with 13 extra points made (second) and 383 passing yards (fourth). Harry Ebding led the NFL with 264 receiving yards and 22.0 receiving yards per game.

1934 NFL season

The 1934 NFL season was the 15th regular season of the National Football League. Before the season, the Portsmouth Spartans moved from Ohio to Detroit, Michigan, and were renamed the Detroit Lions.

The Cincinnati Reds lost their first eight games, then were suspended for not paying league dues. The St. Louis Gunners, an independent team, played the last 3 games of the season for the Reds.

The Ed Thorp Memorial Trophy was established as the league's award for the NFL champion, and was awarded through 1969. The host team for the NFL Championship Game would now alternate between the two divisions, with the Eastern Division champion hosting in even-numbered years, and the Western champion hosting in odd-numbered years.The season ended with the NFL Championship Game when the New York Giants defeated the Chicago Bears at the Polo Grounds in what has become known as the "Sneakers Game".

1934 in Michigan

Events from the year 1934 in Michigan.

1935 Detroit Lions season

The 1935 Detroit Lions season resulted in the Lions winning their first National Football League (NFL) championship. In their second season in Detroit and fifth under head coach Potsy Clark, the Lions placed first in the NFL's Western Division and went on to defeat the New York Giants, 26–7, in the 1935 NFL Championship Game. The leading offensive players were Dutch Clark, who led the NFL with 55 points, and Ernie Caddel, who led the league with 621 yards from scrimmage and 6.4 yards per touch.

1936 in Michigan

Events from the year 1936 in Michigan.

List of Detroit Lions players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the Detroit Lions or for the Portsmouth Spartans (1930–33), in the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least five matches on the NFL regular season. The Detroit Lions franchise was founded in Portsmouth, Ohio as the Portsmouth Spartans. In 1934, the franchise moved to Detroit and changed their name to the Lions, which was a play on the name of the Detroit Tigers.

List of National Football League annual receiving yards leaders

In American football, passing, along with running (also referred to as rushing), is one of the two main methods of advancing the ball down the field. Passes are typically attempted by the quarterback, but any offensive player can attempt a pass provided they are behind the line of scrimmage. To qualify as a passing play, the ball must have initially moved forward after leaving the hands of the passer; if the ball initially moved laterally or backwards, the play would instead be considered a running play. A player who catches a forward pass is a receiver, and the number of receiving yards each player has recorded in each season is a recorded stat in football games. In addition to the overall National Football League (NFL) receiving champion, league record books recognize statistics from the American Football League (AFL), which operated from 1960 to 1969 before being absorbed into the NFL in 1970, Although league record books do not recognize stats from the All-America Football Conference, another league that merged with the NFL, these statistics are recognized by the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The NFL did not begin keeping official records until the 1932 season. The average the yards the leader has gained has increased over time – since the adoption of the 14-game season in 1961, all but one season saw the receiving leader record over 1,000 yards. No player has ever finished with over 2,000 receiving yards in a season; the current record is 1,964 yards, set by Calvin Johnson during the 2012 season. Wes Chandler, who led the league with 1,032 yards in the strike-shortened 1982 season, averaged 129 yards receiving per game, an NFL record.Don Hutson led the league in receiving yards seven times, the most of any player; Jerry Rice is second with six. Hutson also recorded the most consecutive seasons leading the league in receiving, doing so for five seasons from 1941 to 1945, while Jerry Rice ranks second with three consecutive league-leading seasons from 1993 to 1995. A Green Bay Packers player has led the league in receiving yards eleven times, the most in the NFL; the Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams rank second with nine league-leading seasons. The most recent receiving yards leader was Julio Jones of the Atlanta Falcons, who recorded 1,677 receiving yards over the 2018 season.

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