Harold Drew

Harold D. "Red" Drew (November 9, 1894 – October 20, 1979) was an American football, basketball, and track and field coach for over 40 years. He was the head coach of the Alabama Crimson Tide football team from 1947 to 1954, compiling a 54–28–7 record and leading the team to appearances in the Sugar, Orange and Cotton Bowls. He also served as an assistant football coach at Alabama from 1931 to 1941, including the undefeated 1934 team that won the national championship and played in the 1935 Rose Bowl. Drew also served as Alabama's track and field coach for 23 seasons continuing into the mid-1960s. He was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1971.

A native of Maine, Drew received degrees from Bates College in Maine and Springfield College in Massachusetts. He played football for both schools. He also played baseball and also competed as a pole vaulter at Bates College. His athletic career was interrupted by service as a naval aviator during World War I.

Drew began his coaching career as an athletic director, football coach, and basketball coach at Trinity College (1920–1924), Birmingham–Southern College (1924–1927) and the University of Chattanooga, now known as the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (1927–1931). In 1931, he began his long association with the University of Alabama, serving as the head track coach and assistant football coach through the 1930s. He spent three years in the United States Navy during World War II and was placed in charge of "fleet recreation" on the island of Saipan. After the war, he served as the head coach of the Ole Miss Rebels football team in 1946.

Harold Drew
Harold D. Drew
Drew from the 1949 "Corolla"
Biographical details
BornNovember 9, 1894
Dyer Brook, Maine
DiedOctober 20, 1979 (aged 84)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama
Playing career
Football
1915Bates
1916–1917Springfield (MA)
1919Springfield (MA)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1921–1923Trinity (CT)
1924–1927Birmingham–Southern
1928Chattanooga (assistant)
1929–1930Chattanooga
1931–1941Alabama (assistant)
1945Alabama (assistant)
1946Ole Miss
1947–1954Alabama
Basketball
1920–1924Trinity (CT)
1924–1928Birmingham–Southern
1928–1931Chattanooga
Head coaching record
Overall96–68–14 (football)
77–86 (basketball)
Bowls1–2
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 SIAA (1929)
1 SEC (1953)
Awards
Football
SEC Coach of the Year (1952)

Early years

Drew was born in 1894 in Dyer Brook, Maine,[1] and raised in Patten, Maine.[2] He attended Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, where he was played for the school's football and baseball teams and competed in the pole vault for the track team. Known as "Spud" Drew during his college years, Drew received his degree from Bates in 1916.[2][3][4]

In 1916, Drew enrolled for graduate studies at Springfield College in Springfield, Massachusetts.[2][4] While attending Springfield College, he played football and was the captain of the school's 1917 football team.[3]

In November 1917, Drew joined the United States Navy, serving in the Canal Zone as an ensign and a naval aviator during World War I from 1917 to 1918.[2][3][4][5] After the war, Drew returned to Springfield where he played for the school's 1919 football team. He received a B.P.E. degree from Springfield in 1920.[3]

Coaching career

Trinity and Birmingham–Southern

Drew began his coaching career as the athletic director and head football and basketball coach at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut from 1920 to 1924.[3][6][7] Drew left Trinity to accept a position as the athletic director and head football coach at Birmingham–Southern College.[8] He was the football coach at Birmingham–Southern from 1924 to 1927. Drew also coached basketball at Trinity (1920–1924) and Birmingham–Southern (1924–1928).

Chattanooga

In 1928, Drew accepted a position as an assistant football coach at the University of Chattanooga, now known as the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. He was hired at Chattanooga by athletic director and football coach Frank Thomas, with whom Drew would remain associated for most of the following 25 years. When Thomas accepted a coaching position at the University of Georgia in 1929, Drew took over as Chattanooga's athletic director and head coach of the football and basketball teams.[3][9] Drew coached Chattanooga's football team to Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association championships in 1929 and 1930.[3] He also coached Chattanooga's basketball team from 1928 to 1931.

Assistant at Alabama

In January 1931, Drew was hired as an assistant coach under the Alabama Crimson Tide's newly appointed head coach Frank Thomas.[10] This began Drew's long association with the University of Alabama. He served as an assistant football coach for the Crimson Tide from 1931 to 1945, with the exceptions of the 1942, 1943 and 1944 seasons. As an assistant coach at Alabama, Drew was responsible for coaching the ends. He was the position coach for Don Hutson, who went on to become the first star wide receiver in the National Football League. The ends mentored by Drew also included Holt Rast and Bear Bryant.[3][4] The undefeated 1934 Alabama Crimson Tide football team won the national championship with ends Hutson and Bryant as key players. In addition to his duties as an assistant football coach, Drew also coached Alabama's track team.[4]

World War II

Drew missed the 1942, 1943 and 1944 seasons at Alabama while serving in the United States Navy.[11] With the United States entering World War II, Drew enlisted in the Navy in May 1942 and held the rank of lieutenant commander.[4] In the summer of 1942, he completed a course at the U.S. Naval Academy designed for athletic directors, coaches and physical training experts. He was thereafter assigned as the athletic director at the Naval Air Station in Miami, Florida.[12][13] He ultimately deployed to the Pacific Ocean theater where he was placed in charge of "fleet recreation" on the island of Saipan.[5] He was discharged from the Navy and returned to Alabama in May 1945.[14]

Ole Miss

On January 14, 1946, the University of Mississippi announced that it had signed Drew to a three-year contract to succeed Harry Mehre as the head football coach for the Ole Miss Rebels.[15] Drew led Ole Miss to a 2–7 record in his one year as head coach.

Alabama

In January 1947, Drew was hired to succeed Frank Thomas as the head football coach of the Alabama Crimson Tide. In his first year, he led the 1947 Alabama team to an 8–3 record, a berth in the 1948 Sugar Bowl,[16] and a number eight ranking in the final AP poll. In November 1948, he led Alabama to a victory over Georgia Tech that The Tuscaloosa News called "the upset of the season."[17] The following month, he led the Crimson Tide to a 55–0 victory over Auburn,[18] a score which remains the most lopsided in the history of the Alabama–Auburn football rivalry. In August 1951, Drew led the East team to a 15–6 victory in the Third Annual All-American High School game in Memphis.[19] He also led the 1952 team to a 10–2 record and a 61–6 victory over Syracuse in the 1953 Orange Bowl.[20][21][22] Alabama's 55-point margin of victory remains the largest in the history of the Orange Bowl; it was also the highest point total in Orange Bowl history until West Virginia scored 70 points in the 2012 Orange Bowl. When the Orange Bowl bid was announced in November 1952, former Alabama athletes organized to urge the University to sign Drew to a long-term contract, and The Tuscaloosa News reported:

"The invitation also is a fine tribute to Coach Harold (Red) Drew and his staff. We doubt if there is a coaching staff in the country that has done a better job than the one done by the Crimson Tide staff in getting Alabama ready for the Georgia Tech and Maryland games."[23]

Drew was selected as the SEC Coach of the Year in 1952, and he was given a two-year contract extension in December 1952.[24] The following year, he led the 1953 team to a Southeastern Conference (SEC) championship and a berth in the 1954 Cotton Bowl Classic.[25] However, the 1954 team finished in sixth place in the SEC with a 4–5–2 record. With the poor showing of the 1954 team, rumors spread that Drew would not return as the head coach. On December 2, 1954, Drew was removed as the head coach and replaced with J. B. Whitworth. Drew was retained as Alabama's head track coach and associate professor of physical education.[11] Drew was Alabama's track coach for 23 seasons and through at least 1964.[1][26][27][28]

At the end of his tenure as Alabama's head football coach, Drew's salary was reported to have been $12,000 per year.[11] In eight years as Alabama's head football coach, Drew compiled a 54–28–7 record.[29]

Drew was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1970.[1][30]

Personal

Drew was married to Marion Darney in 1922. They had three children: Polly, Harold, Jr., and Bobbie.[3] Drew remained in Tuscaloosa, Alabama after retiring. He died there in 1979 at age 84.

Head coaching record

Football

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Trinity Bantams () (1921–1923)
1921 Trinity 2–4–1
1922 Trinity 4–3
1923 Trinity 2–5
Trinity: 8–12–1
Birmingham–Southern Panthers (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1924–1927)
1924 Birmingham–Southern 4–4–1
1925 Birmingham–Southern 7–3–1
1926 Birmingham–Southern 5–3–2
1927 Birmingham–Southern 3–6
Birmingham–Southern: 19–16–4
Chattanooga Moccasins (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1929–1930)
1929 Chattanooga 8–2 7–0 1st
1930 Chattanooga 5–3–2
Chattanooga: 13–5–2
Ole Miss Rebels (Southeastern Conference) (1946)
1946 Ole Miss 2–7 1–6 11th
Ole Miss: 2–7 1–6
Alabama Crimson Tide (Southeastern Conference) (1947–1954)
1947 Alabama 8–3 5–2 3rd L Sugar 6
1948 Alabama 6–4–1 4–4–1 6th
1949 Alabama 6–3–1 4–3–1 6th
1950 Alabama 9–2 6–2 3rd 17 16
1951 Alabama 5–6 3–5 T–7th
1952 Alabama 10–2 4–2 4th W Orange 9 9
1953 Alabama 6–3–3 4–0–3 1st L Cotton 11 13
1954 Alabama 4–5–2 3–3–2 6th
Alabama: 54–28–7 33–21–7
Total: 96–68–14
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References

  1. ^ a b c "Harold D. 'Red' Drew". Alabama Sports Hall of Fame.
  2. ^ a b c d "Bates Man Signs A New 'Bama' Contract". Lewiston Evening Journal. March 27, 1935.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Bama Football Is Well Known To Coach Drew". The Tuscaloosa News. May 19, 1948.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Reports Of Coach Drew Coming Here 'Indefinite': Oxford Dispatch Quotes Him Offered Post, Adams, Thomas Say No Action". The Tuscaloosa News. January 13, 1947.
  5. ^ a b Norman S. Thomas (January 6, 1950). "Port Sandwich". Lewiston Evening Journal.
  6. ^ "Trinity Coach on Modern Football". The Hartford Courant: Drew Heard At 'Courant' Radio Station. October 6, 1922.
  7. ^ "Spud Drew Quits Post As Trinity Grid Coach". Meriden Morning Record. January 2, 1924.
  8. ^ "'Spud' Drew Gets Away To Brilliant Start Even Though His Charges Lose". The Hartford Courant. October 13, 1924.
  9. ^ "Drew May Be Assistant Grid Coach at U. of A.: Chattanooga Reports Declare Thomas Asks Former Mate To Be Aide Here". The Tuscaloosa News. August 7, 1930.
  10. ^ "Bates Graduate On Alabama Grid Staff". Daily Boston Globe. January 28, 1931.
  11. ^ a b c "Drew Steps Down: Ears Whitworth New 'Bama Coach; Assistants To Stay". Tri-Cities Daily and Florence Times (AP story). December 3, 1954.
  12. ^ "Coaches Drew, Campbell Given Assignments". The Tuscaloosa News. June 17, 1942.
  13. ^ "Navy Claims Majority Of SEC Coaches in Service". St. Petersburg Times. August 30, 1942.
  14. ^ "Sports Shorts". The Florence Times. May 31, 1945.
  15. ^ "Harold Drew Chosen Mentor at Ole Miss" (PDF). The New York Times. January 15, 1946.
  16. ^ "14th Annual Sugar Bowl Classic ~ January 1, 1948". Allstate Sugar Bowl.
  17. ^ "Our Tide And Your Tide". The Tuscaloosa News. November 15, 1948.
  18. ^ "'Tide Drubs Rival, 55–0: Alabama Register Easy Triumph over Auburn Footballers". Youngstown Vindicator. December 4, 1948.
  19. ^ "East Tops West At Memphis". The Tuscaloosa News. August 11, 1951.
  20. ^ "Alabama routs Syracuse in 'Worst mismatch,' 61–6". The Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press. January 2, 1953. p. Section 2, Page 4. Retrieved January 4, 2011.
  21. ^ "Alabama eleven wins greatest bowl mismatch". Ellensburg Daily Record. Associated Press. January 2, 1953. p. 8. Retrieved January 4, 2011.
  22. ^ "Bama gains most lop-sided win in bowl history, 61–6". The Pittsburgh Press. United Press Associations. January 2, 1953. p. 25. Retrieved January 4, 2011.
  23. ^ "Bowl Bid Fitting Tribute For Tide". The Tuscaloosa News. November 25, 1952.
  24. ^ "Drew Gets 2-Year Pact: Dr. Gallalee 'Very Pleased' By Agreement". The Tuscaloosa News. December 10, 1952. p. 1.
  25. ^ Watkins, Ed (January 2, 1954). "Rice beats Alabama 28–6, Moegle is Star". The Tuscaloosa News. p. 1. Retrieved January 3, 2011.
  26. ^ "Tide Trackmen In Indoor Meet". The Tuscaloosa News. March 16, 1961.
  27. ^ "Tide Track Team Debuts At Coliseum". Times Daily. February 7, 1963.
  28. ^ "It's Work Time Again, Says Bear". The Tuscaloosa News. December 4, 1964.
  29. ^ "Alabama Coaching Records". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on 2013-10-13.(confirming Drew's 54–28–7 record at Alabama)
  30. ^ "New Hall of Fame Honorees Lauded". The Tuscaloosa News. August 18, 1970.
1946 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1946 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1946 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 52nd overall and 13th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his 15th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery. They finished with a record of seven wins and four losses (7–4 overall, 4–3 in the SEC).

After the Crimson Tide opened the season with four consecutive victories over Furman, Tulane, South Carolina and Southwestern Louisiana, Alabama's 14-game winning streak was snapped when they lost to Tennessee 12–0. One week later, the Crimson Tide faced off against Kentucky and their young new coach, Bear Bryant, and won by a score of 21–7, before they lost consecutive games to Georgia and LSU. Alabama then closed the season with a victory over Vanderbilt, a loss to Boston College in their first game ever played in New England, and an upset victory over Mississippi State on homecoming in the season finale.

Over the course of the season, Frank Thomas was riddled with health issues that ultimately led to his resignation as head coach. In January 1947, Harold Drew was named as the 17th head coach of the Crimson Tide.

1947 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1947 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1947 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 53rd overall and 14th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished with a record of eight wins and three losses (8–3 overall, 5–2 in the SEC) and with a loss in the Sugar Bowl.

After the Crimson Tide opened the season with a victory over Mississippi Southern, Alabama lost consecutive. games against Tulane and Vanderbilt to open the season 1–2. However, the Crimson Tide rebounded to win their final seven games against Duquesne, Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Georgia Tech, LSU and Miami. Alabama then lost to Texas in the Sugar Bowl to finish the season 8–3.

The 1947 season also marked the first for Harold Drew as head coach for the Crimson Tide. Drew was hired as the replacement for long-time head coach Frank Thomas after he resigned his post due to personal health conditions in January 1947.

1948 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1948 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1948 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 54th overall and 15th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his second year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of six wins, four losses and one tie (6–4–1 overall, 4–4–1 in the SEC).

Alabama opened the season with a loss to Tulane, the first for Alabama to open a season since 1903. The next week the Crimson Tide had to score a touchdown with ten seconds left to salvage a tie with Vanderbilt in the first game ever played at Ladd Stadium. Alabama then defeated Duquesne at home, lost at Tennessee and won at Mississippi State before their 35–0 loss to eventual SEC Champion Georgia. The Crimson Tide then rebounded with victories over Mississippi Southern and Georgia Tech before they lost at LSU. Alabama then closed their season with a homecoming victory over Florida and a 55–0 win over Auburn in the renewal of their rivalry.

1948 Sugar Bowl

The 1948 Sugar Bowl featured the fifth ranked Texas Longhorns and the sixth ranked Alabama Crimson Tide.

In the first quarter, Texas scored on a 99-yard touchdown pass form Bobby Layne to Blount, as Texas opened a 7-0 lead. In the second quarter, Alabama tied the game on an 8-yard touchdown pass from Gilmer to White. In the third quarter, Texas's Vic Vasicek recovered a fumble in the end zone as Texas took a 14-7 lead. Holder later returned an interception 18 yards for a touchdown making it 21-7. Bobby Layne scored on a 1-yard touchdown run making the final score 27-7.

Bobby Layne was named Sugar Bowl MVP.

1949 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1949 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1949 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 55th overall and 16th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his third year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of six wins, three losses and one tie (6–3–1 overall, 4–3–1 in the SEC).

Alabama opened the season with losses against Tulane and at Vanderbilt before they notched their first win of the season against Duquesne at Denny Stadium. A week later, the Crimson Tide played Tennessee to a tie before they won five consecutive games over Mississippi State, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Mississippi Southern and Florida. Alabama then closed their season with a 14–13 loss to Auburn in the Iron Bowl after Ed Salem missed an extra point that would have tied the game with less than two minutes left in the game.

1950 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1950 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1950 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 56th overall and 17th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his fourth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of nine wins and two losses (9–2 overall, 6–2 in the SEC).

Alabama opened the season with victories over Chattanooga and Tulane before they lost their first game of the season against Vanderbilt at Ladd Stadium. The Crimson Tide rebounded the next week with a win over Furman at Denny Stadium, but lost against Tennessee at Shields-Watkins Field in week five. Alabama ten went on to win their final six games over Mississippi State, Georgia, Mississippi Southern, Georgia Tech, Florida and Auburn. Although they finished ranked in the top 20 of both major polls, the Crimson Tide did not receive a bid to play in a bowl game at the conclusion of the season.

1951 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1951 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1951 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 57th overall and 18th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his fifth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham, Ladd Stadium in Mobile and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished with a record of five wins and six losses (5–6 overall, 3–5 in the SEC).

The Crimson Tide opened the season with an 89–0 victory over Delta State, and the 89 points were the most scored by an Alabama team since the 1922 squad defeated Marion Military Institute 110–0. However, the Tide followed the victory up with a four-game losing streak that included losses against LSU, Vanderbilt, Villanova and Tennessee. Alabama then evened its record at 4–4 with victories over Mississippi State, Georgia and Mississippi Southern, but then lost to Georgia Tech and Florida to secure their first losing season since 1903. The Crimson Tide then closed the season with a 25–7 victory over Auburn.

The game against Delta State at Cramton Bowl in Montgomery marked the first year of a four-year period in which Alabama, which was already regularly playing games in Mobile and Birmingham as well as Tuscaloosa, began playing "home" games in four different cities.

1952 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1952 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1952 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 58th overall and 19th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his sixth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham, Ladd Stadium in Mobile and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished with a record of ten wins and two losses (10–2 overall, 4–2 in the SEC) and with a victory over Syracuse in the Orange Bowl.

After a 5–6 campaign for the 1951 season, Alabama bounced back in 1952 to have its best season of the decade and finished 10–2. However, losses to Tennessee, for the fifth consecutive year without a victory, and Georgia Tech cost Alabama the SEC title. The Crimson Tide ended the season in its first bowl game in five years, against Syracuse in the Orange Bowl. The 61–6 Alabama victory set a school record for most points scored in a bowl game and an Orange Bowl record for points scored until the 2012 Orange Bowl. The 55-point margin of victory stood as the all-time record for margin of victory in a bowl game through the 2008 GMAC Bowl.

Freshman quarterback Bart Starr, playing with the varsity, appeared in seven games as the backup to Clell Hobson. Starr went on to have a legendary Hall of Fame career as quarterback of the Green Bay Packers.

1953 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1953 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1953 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 59th overall and 20th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his seventh year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham, Ladd Stadium in Mobile and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished with a record of six wins, three losses and three ties (6–3–3 overall, 4–0–3 in the SEC), as SEC Champions and with a loss against Rice in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

1953 was one of the more unusual seasons in Alabama history. After they opened the season as the preseason No. 5 team, the Crimson Tide lost to Mississippi Southern and tied LSU before they had their first win of the season against Vanderbilt in week three. Alabama won only six games all year, and only four of seven conference games. However, the other three conference games were ties, and a 4–0–3 record was good enough to win Alabama the SEC title. It was Bama's first conference championship since 1945 and last until 1961. For their championship, Alabama accepted an invitation to play in the Cotton Bowl Classic.

In their matchup against Rice one of the strangest plays in the history of college football occurred. In the second quarter, the Owls had the ball on its own five-yard line up 7–6 after they recovered an Alabama fumble. On their first play of the drive, Rice running back Dicky Moegle swept around the right side, broke free, and appeared to be on his way to a 95-yard touchdown run—until Tommy Lewis of Alabama, who was on the sideline, ran into the field of play and tackled Moegle at the Alabama 40. Officials awarded Moegle a 95-yard touchdown run, and Rice won the game 28–6.

1954 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1954 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1954 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 60th overall and 21st season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham, Ladd Stadium in Mobile and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished with a record of four wins, five losses and two ties (4–5–2 overall, 3–3–2 in the SEC).

After a second consecutive season-opening loss to Mississippi Southern, Alabama reeled off a four-game winning streak that included shutout victories over LSU, Tulsa and Tennessee. However, the Crimson Tide followed their streak by scoring only 14 points over the final six games of the 1954 season. After their win over Tennessee, Alabama lost to Mississippi State, and in the loss began a streak of 16 consecutive scoreless quarters that tied the all-time school record. Consecutive scoreless ties against Georgia and Tulane followed, despite quarterback Bart Starr's attempted comeback from a brutal pre-season hazing injury. The season ended with losses to Georgia Tech, Miami and Auburn by a combined score of 71–7. Their record of 4–5–2 was only Alabama's second losing season in 50 years.

After the conclusion of the season, on December 2, Harold Drew resigned as head coach of the Crimson Tide. During his tenure as head coach, Drew had a winning record going 54–28–7 in seven years. Drew's teams won one conference title and played in three bowl games in eight years. On the day of Drew's resignation, Jennings B. Whitworth was introduced as his successor as head coach after he served in the same capacity at Oklahoma A&M.

1955 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1955 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1955 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 61st overall and 22nd season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Jennings B. Whitworth, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of zero wins and ten losses (0–10 overall, 0–7 in the SEC).

On December 2, 1954, Harold Drew resigned as head coach of the Crimson Tide, and Jennings B. Whitworth was introduced as his successor. Whitworth brought a new system that was more oriented towards the running game. As a result, senior quarterback Bart Starr and the other Tide seniors saw little playing time. Whitworth, for his part, was only allowed to hire two assistants and required to retain the rest of Coach Drew's staff.Alabama football hit rock bottom in 1955, going 0–10, the worst season in school history. It was only the third winless season in the history of the Crimson Tide, the others being the 0–4 teams in 1893 and 1895 when the program was just starting. For the season, Alabama only averaged 4.8 points per game and the opposition averaged 25.6. The Tide was shut out four times, the opposition never scored fewer than 20 points, and the smallest margin of defeat was 15 points in a 21–6 loss to Vanderbilt.

Birmingham–Southern Panthers football

The Birmingham–Southern Panthers football team represents Birmingham–Southern College (BSC) in the NCAA Division III, competing as part of the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference. BSC plays its home games at the 1,600 seat Panther Stadium, which is located on-campus in Birmingham, Alabama and opened in November 2008. Although only fielding a team since the 2007 season, Birmingham–Southern previously fielded a team from the 1918 season that was later disbanded following the 1939 season.

Frank Thomas (American football)

Frank William Thomas (November 15, 1898 – May 10, 1954) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Chattanooga from 1925 to 1928 and at the University of Alabama from 1931 to 1946, compiling a career college football record of 141–33–9. During his tenure at Alabama, Thomas amassed a record of 115–24–7 and won four Southeastern Conference titles while his teams allowed an average of just 6.3 points per game. Thomas's 1934 Alabama team completed a 10–0 season with a victory over Stanford in the Rose Bowl and was named national champion by a number of selectors.

Thomas's total wins and winning percentage at Alabama rank third all-time among Crimson Tide football coaches, behind only Nick Saban & Paul "Bear" Bryant, whom Thomas coached in the mid-1930s. Thomas never coached a losing season, and twice his teams had undefeated, 10-win campaigns. Thomas was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

Harold Rowe (cricketer)

Samuel Harold Drew Rowe (5 November 1883 – 29 October 1968) was one of Western Australia's leading cricketers in the years before Western Australia competed in the Sheffield Shield interstate competition. He was later Western Australia's leading cricket administrator and was instrumental in gaining the state team's entry into the Sheffield Shield in 1947.

Johnny Spiegel

John E. Spiegel was an American football player, coach of football and basketball, and college athletics administrator. A native of Detroit, Michigan, Spiegel played at the halfback position for Washington & Jefferson College from 1913 to 1914. He was selected as a second-team All-American in 1913 and was the leading scorer in college football. In 1914, he was a consensus first-team All-American. From 1915 to 1916, Spiegel was the football coach, basketball coach, and athletic director at the University of Chattanooga. After World War I, Spiegel coached at Muhlenberg College from 1921 to 1922.

Johnny Vaught

John Howard Vaught (May 6, 1909 – February 3, 2006) was an American college football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) from 1947 to 1970 and again in 1973.

Born in Olney, Texas, Vaught graduated as valedictorian from Polytechnic High School in Fort Worth, Texas and attended Texas Christian University (TCU), where he was an honor student and was named an All-American in 1932. Vaught served as a line coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill under head coach Raymond Wolf from 1936 until 1941. In 1942, Vaught served as an assistant coach with the North Carolina Pre-Flight School.After serving in World War II as a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy, he took a job as an assistant coach at Ole Miss in 1946 under Harold Drew, and replaced Drew as head coach a year later. He did not take long to make an impact, taking a team that had finished 2–7 and leading it to the first conference title in school history. He led the Rebels to additional Southeastern Conference titles in 1954, 1955, 1960, 1962, and 1963. To date, Vaught is the only coach in Ole Miss history to win an SEC football championship. He also dominated the Egg Bowl rivalry with Mississippi State, going 19–2–4 against the Bulldogs.

His 1960 team finished 10–0–1 and was the only major-conference team to go undefeated on the field that year. As a result, it won a share of the national championship; it was awarded the Grantland Rice Award from the Football Writers Association of America after the bowl games. In those days, the wire services crowned their national champion before the bowl games. It is very likely that Ole Miss would have finished atop one poll, if not both, had they been taken after the bowl games as they are today. His 1962 team finished 10-0 and finished third in both polls; to date, it is the only undefeated and untied season in school history.

Vaught took Ole Miss to 18 bowl games, winning 10 times including five victories in the Sugar Bowl. Only two coaches held a winning record against Vaught: Paul "Bear" Bryant, with a record of 7–6–1 against Vaught, and Robert Neyland, with a record of 3–2.

Vaught suffered a mild heart attack on October 20, 1970. His longtime line coach, Bruiser Kinard, served as interim head coach for the remainder of the season, though Ole Miss credits the entire season to Vaught.

Vaught formally retired after the season. Billy Kinard, Bruiser's younger brother, succeeded him; he was appointed by his older brother, who had become athletic director. However, after a lackluster start to the 1973 season, Ole Miss fired Billy Kinaird and demoted Bruiser Kinaird. Vaught was named athletic director, and also served as interim head coach for the remainder of the 1973 season.Vaught's overall record at Ole Miss was 190–61–12. His 190 wins are far and away the most in school history. When Vaught arrived, Ole Miss ranked 9th in all-time SEC football standings. When he retired in 1970, Ole Miss had moved up to third, behind only Alabama and Tennessee. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1979. In 1982, Ole Miss honored Vaught by adding his name to Hemingway Stadium. On February 3, 2006, Vaught died at the age of 96 in Oxford, Mississippi.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide bowl games

The Alabama Crimson Tide football team competes as part of the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), representing the University of Alabama in the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). Since the establishment of the team in 1892, Alabama has appeared in 69 bowl games. Included in these games are 39 combined appearances in the traditional "big four" bowl games (the Rose, Sugar, Cotton, and Orange), 6 Bowl Championship Series (BCS) game appearances (including three victories in the BCS National Championship Game) and four appearances in the College Football Playoff, and two victories in the College Football Playoff National Championship Game.Alabama's first bowl game was in 1926, when Wallace Wade led them to the first of three Rose Bowls during his tenure and defeated Washington 20–19. Taking over for Wade following the 1930 season, between 1931 and 1946 Frank Thomas led Alabama to six bowl appearances including three Rose, and one trip each to the Cotton, Orange and Sugar Bowls. After Thomas, Harold Drew led Alabama to the Sugar, Orange and Cotton Bowls between 1947 and 1954. After a five-year bowl absence, Alabama made the first of 24 consecutive bowl appearances under Paul "Bear" Bryant in the 1959 Liberty Bowl. From 1959 to 1982, Bryant led the Crimson Tide to eight Sugar, five Orange, four Cotton, four Liberty, two Bluebonnet and one Gator Bowls.After Bryant retired, Ray Perkins extended Alabama's consecutive bowl game streak to 25 years with a victory in the 1983 Sun Bowl. However, the streak ended when the 1984 team finished the season with a record of five wins and six losses and failed to qualify for a bowl for the first time in 26 years. The bowl absence lasted only one season as Perkins led the Crimson Tide to wins in both the Aloha and Sun Bowls before he resigned as head coach following the 1986 season. Bill Curry continued the bowl tradition and led the Crimson Tide to Hall of Fame, Sun and Sugar Bowl appearances in his three seasons as head coach. After Curry, Gene Stallings took Alabama to the Fiesta, Blockbuster, Gator, Citrus and Outback Bowls. Stallings also led the Crimson Tide to victory in the first Bowl Coalition national championship game with a 34–13 victory over Miami in the Sugar Bowl. In August 1995, as part of the penalty imposed by the NCAA for rules violations, Alabama was ruled ineligible to participate in the 1995 bowl season.Following the retirement of Stallings, Mike DuBose was hired as head coach. After failing to qualify for a bowl game in 1997, DuBose led the Crimson Tide to the inaugural Music City Bowl and Alabama's first BCS bowl berth in the Orange Bowl. After again failing to qualify for a bowl in 2000, DuBose was fired and Dennis Franchione was hired as head coach. In his first season, Franchione led Alabama to the Independence Bowl. In February 2002, the NCAA found Alabama violated multiple rules, and as part of its penalty a two-year bowl ban was imposed to include both the 2002 and 2003 seasons. Eligible again to compete in bowl games, Mike Shula led Alabama to the Music City Bowl and a victory in the Cotton Bowl. However, in 2009, Alabama was again found to have violated NCAA rules between 2005 and 2007 and as part of their penalty, the 2006 Cotton Bowl Classic victory was officially vacated. In the week following the 2006 loss to Auburn, Shula was fired and Joe Kines served as interim head coach for the Independence Bowl loss.In January 2007, Nick Saban was hired as head coach, and has led the Crimson Tide to 15 bowl appearances in his twelve seasons at Alabama. After defeating Colorado in the Independence Bowl, Saban led Alabama to their second BCS bowl against Utah in the Sugar Bowl. In 2009, Saban led the Crimson Tide to the BCS National Championship Game, and defeated Texas 37–21 to clinch the program's first national title of the BCS era. A year after Alabama defeated Michigan State in the 2011 Capital One Bowl, the Crimson Tide defeated LSU in the BCS National Championship Game to clinch the program's second national title of the BCS era. The following season, the Crimson Tide won their second consecutive BCS National Championship Game by a final score of 42–14 over Notre Dame. In their latest bowl appearance, Alabama beat Oklahoma in the 2018 Orange Bowl, thereby advancing to the College Football Playoff National Championship against Clemson. The win brings Alabama's overall bowl record to 41 wins, 25 losses, and 3 ties, placing the Crimson Tide in first place among all FBS schools for both bowl appearances and victories.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide head football coaches

The Alabama Crimson Tide college football team represents the University of Alabama in the West Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Crimson Tide competes as part of the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 27 head coaches, and 1 interim head coach, since it began play during the 1892 season. Since January 2007, Nick Saban has served as Alabama's head coach.Adopting the nickname of the Crimson Tide after the 1907 season, the team has played more than 1,100 games over 119 seasons. In that time, 12 coaches have led the Crimson Tide in postseason bowl games: Wallace Wade, Frank Thomas, Harold Drew, Paul "Bear" Bryant, Ray Perkins, Bill Curry, Gene Stallings, Mike DuBose, Dennis Franchione, Mike Shula, Joe Kines, and Saban. Eight of those coaches also won conference championships: Wade captured four as a member of the Southern Conference and Thomas, Drew, Bryant, Curry, Stallings, DuBose, and Saban won a combined 25 as a member of the SEC. During their tenures, Wade, Thomas, Bryant, Stallings, and Saban each won national championships with the Crimson Tide.Bryant is the leader in seasons coached and games won, with 232 victories during his 25 years with the program. Saban has the highest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .866. Jennings B. Whitworth has the lowest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .166. Mike Price, who was hired in 2003, was fired prior to coaching a game. Of the 28 different head coaches who have led the Crimson Tide, Wade, Thomas, Bryant, and Stallings have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

M. S. Harvey

Michael Smith Harvey (February 9, 1881 – June 3, 1958) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Alabama in 1901, at Auburn University in 1902, and at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) from 1903 to 1904, and compiling a career college football record of 8–7–3. In 1900, Harvey played tackle at Auburn.

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