Harold Baines

Harold Douglas Baines (born March 15, 1959) is an American former professional baseball right fielder who played in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Sox, Texas Rangers, Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles and Cleveland Indians between 1980 and 2001. Baines batted and threw left-handed. He is best known for his three stints with the Chicago White Sox, a team he coached with until 2015, before moving into a role of team ambassador and spring training instructor.[1] Baines, a Maryland native, played seven years with his hometown team, the Orioles, over three separate stints.

Upon his retirement, Baines ranked seventh in American League (AL) history in games played (2,830) and tenth in runs batted in (RBIs; 1,628). Noted as well for his power hitting in clutch situations, he is tied for seventh in AL history in grand slams (13),[2] fourth in three home run games (3),[3] and tied for seventh in major league history in walk-off home runs (10).[2] Baines batted over .300 eight times and hit .324 in 31 career postseason games, topping the .350 mark in five separate series.

A six-time All-Star, Baines led the AL in slugging percentage in 1984. He held the White Sox team record for career home runs from 1987 until Carlton Fisk passed him in 1990; his eventual total of 221 remains the club record for left-handed hitters, as do his 981 RBIs and 585 extra base hits with the team. His 1,652 games as a designated hitter are a major league record, and he held the mark for career home runs as a DH (236) until Edgar Martínez passed him in 2004. He also led the major leagues in hits as a DH (1,688) until the mark was surpassed by David Ortiz on July 10, 2013. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on December 9, 2018, by the Today's Game Era Committee.

Harold Baines
Harold Baines
Baines with the Chicago White Sox
Designated hitter / Right fielder
Born: March 15, 1959 (age 60)
Easton, Maryland
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 10, 1980, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 27, 2001, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.289
Hits2,866
Home runs384
Runs batted in1,628
Teams
As player

As coach

Career highlights and awards
Incoming Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction2019
Vote75%
Election MethodToday's Game Committee

Early years

Baines was born in Easton, Maryland. He graduated in 1977 from St. Michaels High School on Maryland's Eastern Shore where, as a senior, he batted .532 and was named a high school All-American.[4] The White Sox made Baines the first overall selection in the 1977 amateur draft. He received a signing bonus of $32,000 - a record low for a first overall pick.[5] The owner of the White Sox at the time, Bill Veeck, had spotted Baines playing Little League ball years before at the age of 12.

Professional career

On Opening Day 1980, Baines made his MLB debut, starting as an outfielder with the Chicago White Sox. On 1982, he had 165 hits, 25 home runs and 105 runs batted in (RBIs). In 1984, baseball writer Bill James called Baines his favorite opposing player to watch, saying, "He is gorgeous, absolutely complete. I've seen him drop down bunts that would melt in your mouth, come up the next time and execute a hit and run that comes straight off the chalkboard. I've seen him hit fastballs out of the yard on a line, and I've seen him get under a high curve and loft it just over the fence."[6] Baines ended the longest game in major league history (eight hours and six minutes over 25 innings on successive evenings) with a walk-off home run against the Milwaukee Brewers' Chuck Porter on May 8, 1984; the bat he used is currently kept at the Baseball Hall of Fame.

In 1986, a succession of knee problems began which gradually ended his fielding career, forcing him to become a regular designated hitter. Despite the knee ailments and the resulting lack of speed, he remained a powerful hitter, picking up 166 hits in 1988.

Baines holds the record for the most seasons by a player between 100 RBIs, with 14 seasons between 113 RBIs for Chicago in 1985 and 103 for Baltimore and Cleveland in 1999.[7]

Harold baines2001
Baines before a 2001 game
SoxRetired03
Baines's number 3 was retired by the Chicago White Sox in 1989.

Midway through the 1989 season, the Texas Rangers acquired Baines, along with Fred Manrique, from the White Sox in a much-derided trade which sent Wilson Álvarez, Scott Fletcher and Sammy Sosa to Chicago. After the trade, the White Sox retired Baines' #3 on August 20, 1989, a rare occurrence for a player who was still active in the major leagues (the number would be "un-retired" each time Baines returned to the White Sox, and he wore it as a coach).

In 1990 Baines was traded to the Oakland Athletics for minor league pitchers Scott Chiamparino and Joe Bitker, and he helped them reach the postseason only to be swept by the Cincinnati Reds in the World Series. In 1992 the Athletics returned to the playoffs, only to lose to the Toronto Blue Jays in the ALCS.[8]

Prior to the 1993 season, Baines was traded by the A's to the Baltimore Orioles for minor league pitchers Bobby Chouinard and Allen Plaster. Baines batted .313, .294 and .299 over his first three seasons with Baltimore. He returned to the White Sox as a free agent in 1996 but was traded back to Baltimore midway through the 1997 season; he helped the Orioles reach the playoffs, losing to the Cleveland Indians in the League Championship Series.

Baines represented the Orioles in the 1999 All Star Game before being traded to the Cleveland Indians later that year. Baines was signed again for a third stint with his hometown team prior to the 2000 season. Baines was traded by Baltimore with catcher Charles Johnson to Chicago in exchange for Miguel Felix, Juan Figueroa, Brook Fordyce and Jason Lakman on July 29, 2000.

His final contract with the White Sox was not renewed following the 2001 season, after his third stint with the team. He finished his career with 2,866 hits, 384 home runs and 1,628 RBIs. His career RBI total is 30th all-time; prior to his induction, he had the ninth highest RBI count among retired players not elected in the Hall of Fame; his hit total ranks 41st all-time.

Coaching career

Harold Baines 1986
Baines took a high step with his right leg, a la Mel Ott, as part of his stride into a pitch.

Baines' fourth stint with the Chicago White Sox began when he was named bench coach in March 2004 under new manager Ozzie Guillén, his White Sox teammate, from 1985 to 1989 and in 1996–97.

In 2005, as a coach for the White Sox, he earned a World Series ring when the White Sox won the 2005 World Series.

Honors

On July 20, 2008, the White Sox unveiled a bronze statue of Baines at U.S. Cellular Field prior to their game against the Kansas City Royals; it is the seventh statue featured on the park's outfield concourse.[9][10]

20170718 Dodgers-WhiteSox Harold Baines performing a cermony (3)
Baines in 2017 at Guaranteed Rate Field

In August 2009 the Orioles announced that Baines would be inducted into the Orioles Hall of Fame as the 46th member. In his seven seasons with the Orioles he batted .301, had 107 home runs, and 378 RBIs as their designated hitter.[11]

Hall of Fame candidacy

Baines had been eligible for the National Baseball Hall of Fame beginning with the 2007 election. While 75% of the vote is needed for induction, he never received greater than 6.1% (which he received in 2010).[12] On January 5, 2011, Baines received just 28 votes (4.8%) in the 2011 Hall of Fame election, dropping him off all future writers' Hall of Fame ballots by receiving less than 5.0% of the vote.

On December 9, 2018, Baines and Lee Smith were elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 2019 via the Today's Game Era ballot, a voting panel of 16 consisting of six players (five played against him), one manager, six executives, and three journalists.[13] Although many baseball writers and fans were shocked that someone who was eliminated so quickly from the regular ballot with such a low percentage history was allowed in through the Veterans Committee, Baines was voted in by his peers on the committee, as he played against five of the six players on the committee, while a sixth was a manager against him, and four executives who served on the panel were in management while Baines was a player, while also his former manager and team owner also were on the committee at the time.[14]

Personal life

Baines' hometown of St. Michaels has designated January 9 as Harold Baines Day. He has also created the Harold Baines Scholarship Fund to help deserving college-bound students.[15]

Baines is married to Marla Henry and has four children: Toni, Britni, Harold, Jr., and Courtney. Harold, Jr. went to McDaniel College which is NCAA Division III in athletics and formerly known as Western Maryland College, located in Westminster, Maryland. All attended Baines' alma mater, St. Michaels Middle/High School.[16]

See also

References

  1. ^ "White Sox will keep manager Robin Ventura for 2016 season". Chicago Tribune. November 2, 2018. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
  2. ^ a b Spatz, Lyle, ed. (2007). The SABR Baseball List & Record Book. New York: Scribner. p. 46. ISBN 978-1-4165-3245-3.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  3. ^ Spatz, p. 53.
  4. ^ Vaughn, Rick, editor (April 5, 1993). "There's No Place Like Home: Maryland's native son joins the Orioles". Orioles Program, Opening Day. p. 18.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  5. ^ "Signing Bonuses: No. 1 Overall Picks Year-by-Year". Perfect Game USA. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  6. ^ James, Bill (1984). "Player Ratings". The Bill James Baseball Abstract 1984. New York: Ballantine Books. p. 220. ISBN 0-345-31155-8.
  7. ^ Spatz, Lyle (2007). TheSABR Baseball List & Record Book – Baseball's Most Fascinating Records and Unusual Statistics. United States: Simon & Schuster. p. 496. ISBN 9781416532453.
  8. ^ Harold Baines, baseballlibrary.com Archived August 15, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ "Teary Baines gets statue, 21 July 2008, Toni Ginnetti, Chicago Sun-Times; accessed 15 August 2008". Archived from the original on August 9, 2008. Retrieved August 16, 2008.
  10. ^ "Baines grateful and honored by his statue, 20 July 2008, Dave van Dyck, Chicago Tribune; accessed 15 August 2008". Archived from the original on August 4, 2008. Retrieved August 16, 2008.
  11. ^ MLB.com (March 24, 2009). "Harold Baines elected to Orioles Hall of Fame". Baltimore.orioles.mlb.com. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
  12. ^ Baseball Reference.
  13. ^ "Cubs pitcher Lee Smith, White Sox outfielder Harold Baines elected to the Hall of Fame". Chicago Tribune. November 2, 2018. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
  14. ^ https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/12/10/harold-baines-hall-fame
  15. ^ "Harold Baines Speaks". Z.lee28.tripod.com. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
  16. ^ "Manager and Coaches | WhiteSox.com: Team". Chicago.whitesox.mlb.com. Retrieved December 10, 2018.

External links

1980 Chicago White Sox season

The 1980 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 80th season in Major League Baseball, and its 81st season overall. They finished with a record of 70-90, good enough for 5th place in the American League West, 26 games behind the first-place Kansas City Royals.

In 1979 and 1980, Bill Veeck made overtures to Denver interests. An agreement was reached to sell to Edward J. DeBartolo, Sr., who pledged to keep the club in Chicago. His offer was turned down by the owners. Veeck was forced to sell to a different investment group.

1982 Chicago White Sox season

The 1982 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 82nd season in the major leagues, and their 83rd season overall. They finished with a record 87-75, good enough for 3rd place in the American League West, 6 games behind the 1st place California Angels.

1985 Chicago White Sox season

The 1985 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 86th season. They finished with a record 85–77, good enough for 3rd place in the American League West, 6 games behind the 1st place Kansas City Royals.

1987 Chicago White Sox season

The 1987 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 88th season. They finished with a record of 77-85, giving them 5th place in the American League West, 8 games behind of the 1st place Minnesota Twins. The White Sox spent most of 1987 in the cellar, occupying last place from June 9 until September 30, but won 9 of their last 10 to pass the Texas Rangers and California Angels in the season's final week.

1988 Chicago White Sox season

The 1988 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 89th season. They finished with a record 71-90, good enough for 5th place in the American League West, 32.5 games behind of the 1st place Oakland Athletics.

1989 Chicago White Sox season

The 1989 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 90th season. They finished with a record 69-92, good enough for 7th place in the American League West, 29.5 games behind of the 1st place Oakland Athletics.

1989 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1989 season involved the Rangers finishing fourth in the American League West with a record of 83 wins and 79 losses.

1990 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1990 season was their 23rd in Oakland, California. It was also the 90th season in franchise history. The team finished first in the American League West with a record of 103-59.

The Athletics' 1990 campaign ranks among the organization's finest. Oakland, in winning 103 games, led the league outright in wins for a third consecutive season; they remained the last major North American team to accomplish this until 2017, when the feat was matched by the nearby Golden State Warriors of the NBA. The Athletics benefited from stellar performances in all areas of the game. The team's offense was led by eventual Hall-of-Famer Rickey Henderson. Henderson finished the season with 65 stolen bases, 28 home runs, and a .325 batting average; for his efforts, he took home the 1990 American League MVP Award. The Athletics also benefited from strong performances by superstars Mark McGwire and Jose Canseco. The pair clubbed 39 and 37 home runs, respectively; in doing so, they drove in a combined total of 209 runs. Over the course of the season, the team added to an already strong offense; the additions of recent All-Stars Willie Randolph, Willie McGee, and Harold Baines further widened the gap between the Athletics and the rest of the league. Established veterans (such as Carney Lansford, Terry Steinbach, Dave Henderson, and Mike Gallego) and promising young players (mainly Walt Weiss and Mike Bordick) rounded out arguably the deepest roster in all of Major League Baseball. Eight of the Athletics' nine main postseason starters (R. Henderson, McGwire, Canseco, McGee, Steinbach, Randolph, Baines, and Lansford) played in at least one All-Star Game between 1988 and 1990.

The Athletics pitching staff, in many regards, had an even stronger campaign. The starting rotation was led by veteran Bob Welch. Welch would finish the season with both an MLB-leading 27 wins and a 2.95 ERA; this performance was strong enough to net the 1990 Cy Young Award. Welch, as of 2014, remains the last MLB pitcher to win at least 25 games in a season. Fellow starter Dave Stewart, winner of 22 games, finished in a tie (with Pittsburgh starter Doug Drabek) for the second-most wins in MLB. 1989 All-Star Mike Moore, 1991 All-Star Scott Sanderson, and longtime Athletic Curt Young rounded out the American League's top rotation. The Athletics' bullpen was led by superstar closer Dennis Eckersley, who posted a microscopic 0.61 ERA while recording 48 saves. As a team, the Athletics allowed only 570 runs (the fewest in the American League by a wide margin).

The Athletics easily won the American League West for a third consecutive season. They swept the Boston Red Sox, four games to none, in that year's American League Championship Series; in doing so, they won a third consecutive American League pennant. The Athletics entered the 1990 World Series as heavy favorites. Despite this, however, they were themselves swept by the Cincinnati Reds. The Athletics have not reached the World Series since.

1993 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1993 season was the team's 26th in Oakland, California. It was also the 93rd season in franchise history. The team finished seventh in the American League West with a record of 68-94.

The Athletics' disastrous 1993 campaign was mired by inconsistency, injuries, and free agent losses. The team lost key contributors Dave Stewart, Harold Baines, and Mike Moore to free agency; the players ended up (respectively) in Toronto, Chicago, and Detroit. The A's also traded Walt Weiss to the expansion Florida Marlins for Scott Baker and Eric Hefland. The Athletics' roster was further weakened by the retirement of longtime third baseman Carney Lansford.

The team's depleted pitching staff was no match for its American League (AL) competition. The Athletics, following a resurgent 1992 campaign, finished 1993 with a team ERA of 4.90; this was the worst such figure in the AL. The futility of Oakland's new-look starting rotation was especially noteworthy; of the team's five primary starters (Bobby Witt, Ron Darling, Bob Welch, Todd Van Poppel, and Shawn Hillegas), only one (Witt) managed a sub-5.00 ERA. On offense, the Athletics also struggled; the loss of their two best players (Mark McGwire and Rickey Henderson) to injury and a trade, respectively, contributed to their scoring only 715 runs (10th of 14 AL teams).

The Athletics' 68-94 finish was their worst since 1982. Moreover, the 1993 Athletics (as of 2018) remain the only team in Oakland history to finish last in the AL West after finishing first one-year earlier.

2019 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the National Baseball Hall of Fame for 2019 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2016. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players. The results were announced on January 22, 2019, with the BBWAA electing Mariano Rivera, Roy Halladay, Edgar Martínez and Mike Mussina to the Hall of Fame. Rivera and Halladay were elected in their first year of eligibility, while Martínez was elected in his last year of eligibility. Rivera became the first player to be unanimously elected, appearing on all 425 ballots; he broke Ken Griffey Jr.'s record of 99.32 percent (437 out of 440), set in 2016.The Today's Game Era Committee, one of four voting panels that since 2016 have taken over the role of the more broadly defined Veterans Committee, convened on December 9, 2018 to select from a ballot of retired players and non-playing personnel who made their greatest contributions to the sport after 1987, with Harold Baines and Lee Smith elected by this body. The formal induction ceremony will be held at the Hall's facilities in Cooperstown, New York on July 21, 2019.

Bo McLaughlin

Michael Duane "Bo" McLaughlin (born October 23, 1953) was a Major League Baseball relief pitcher from 1976 to 1982 for the Houston Astros, Atlanta Braves, and Oakland Athletics. McLaughlin is best known for being hit by a pitch that almost ended his career, and his alias "Grim Bimbledon."

On May 26, 1981, McLaughlin was pitching in the eighth inning of a game against the Chicago White Sox. He threw a sinker to Harold Baines, who hit a line drive into McLaughlin's face. The pitch broke McLaughlin's left cheekbone and his eye socket in five different places. McLaughlin vomited blood and went into shock. It took two surgeries to wire his cheekbone and left eye socket, and doctors at Oakland's Merritt Hospital feared that he would not last the night. McLaughlin recovered to play a few games in September that year, then spent 1982 with the A's. He was demoted to the Minors in 1983 and played three seasons of Triple-A baseball. He later went into the real estate business and coached in the minor leagues for the Chicago Cubs and Baltimore Orioles systems before moving on to his current job with the Rockies.

Chuck Porter (baseball)

Charles William Porter (born January 12, 1956), is an American former professional baseball player, a pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1981 to 1985 for the Milwaukee Brewers. Prior to turning professional, Porter played for the Clemson Tigers, where he was named ACC Player of the Year in 1976.

Porter is notable for giving up the home run that ended the longest game in MLB history on May 9, 1984. It was hit by Harold Baines of the Chicago White Sox.

Edgar Martínez Award

The Edgar Martínez Outstanding Designated Hitter Award, commonly referred to as the Edgar Martínez Award and originally known as the Outstanding Designated Hitter Award, has been presented annually to the most outstanding designated hitter (DH) in the American League (AL) in Major League Baseball (MLB) since 1973. The award is voted on by club beat reporters, broadcasters and AL public relations departments. All players with a minimum of 100 at bats at DH are eligible. It was given annually by members of the Associated Press who are beat writers, broadcasters, and public relations directors. The Associated Press discontinued the award in 2000, but it was picked up by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, which has administered it since.In September 2004, at Safeco Field ceremonies in honor of Edgar Martínez, Commissioner Bud Selig announced that the award would be renamed for the five-time recipient (1995, 1997–98, 2000–01). In an 18-year career with the Seattle Mariners, primarily as a designated hitter, Martínez batted .312, with 309 career home runs and 1,261 runs batted in.David Ortiz has won the award eight times, more than any other player (2003–2007, 2011, 2013, 2016). Other repeat winners of the award include Martinez himself (five times), three-time winner Hal McRae (1976, 1980, and 1982) and two-time winners Willie Horton (1975 and 1979), Greg Luzinski (1981 and 1983), Don Baylor (1985 and 1986), Harold Baines (1987 and 1988), Dave Parker (1989 and 1990), and Paul Molitor (1993 and 1996). Boston Red Sox players have won the most Edgar Martínez Awards with eleven.

Joe Bitker

Joseph Anthony Bitker (born February 12, 1964) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played for two seasons. He played for the Oakland Athletics for one game on July 31, 1990, then was traded to the Texas Rangers with Scott Chiamparino for Harold Baines. He then played for the Rangers in 1990 and 1991.

List of Silver Slugger Award winners at designated hitter

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.Designated hitters (DH) only receive a Silver Slugger Award in the American League because the batting order in the National League includes the pitcher; therefore, pitchers receive the National League award instead. David Ortiz has won the most Silver Sluggers as a designated hitter, capturing four consecutively from 2004 to 2007, and winning again in 2011, 2013 and 2016. Two players are tied with four wins. Paul Molitor won the award four times with three different teams: the Milwaukee Brewers in 1987 and 1988; the Toronto Blue Jays in 1993, when the team won the World Series; and the Minnesota Twins in 1996. Edgar Martínez won the award four times with the Seattle Mariners (1995, 1997, 2001, 2003). Don Baylor won the Silver Slugger three times in four years (1983, 1985–1986) as a designated hitter with the New York Yankees and the Boston Red Sox, and Frank Thomas won it twice with the Chicago White Sox (1991, 2000). Harold Baines won the award while playing for two separate teams in the same season; he was traded by the White Sox to the Texas Rangers in the middle of the 1989 season. J. D. Martinez is the most recent winner.

Martínez set the records for the highest batting average and on-base percentage in a designated hitter's winning season with his .356 and .479 marks, respectively, in 1995. Manny Ramírez' slugging percentage of .647 is best among all winners at the position. Ortiz hit 54 home runs during the 2006 season, when he won his third consecutive award, and his 2005 total of 148 runs batted in is tied with Rafael Palmeiro's 1999 mark for best among designated hitters.

List of first overall Major League Baseball draft picks

The First-Year Player Draft, also known as the Rule 4 Draft, is Major League Baseball's (MLB) primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs to its teams. Unlike most professional sports, MLB does not permit the trading of draft picks, so the draft order is solely determined by the previous season's standings; the team that possesses the worst record receives the first pick. If two teams have identical records, the team with the worse record in the previous season will receive the higher pick. In addition, teams that lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded "compensatory" picks. The first draft took place in 1965; it was introduced to prevent richer teams from negotiating wealthier contracts with top-level prospects and therefore, monopolizing the player market. Originally, three drafts were held each year. The first draft took place in June and involved high-school graduates and college seniors who had just finished their seasons. The second draft took place in January for high school and college players who had graduated in December. The third draft took place in August and was for players who participated in American amateur summer leagues. The August draft was eliminated after two years, and the January draft lasted until 1986.In 1965, Rick Monday became MLB's first draft pick after being selected by the Kansas City Athletics. Adley Rutschman is the most recent first overall pick; he was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in 2019. Overall, 23 of the 50 picks before 2015 have participated in the All-Star Game, and four (Bob Horner, Darryl Strawberry, Bryce Harper, and Carlos Correa) have won the Rookie of the Year Award. Twenty-five of the fifty picks before 2015 have been drafted from high schools, one has been drafted out of the Independent American Association, and the others were drafted from universities. To date, Arizona State University and Vanderbilt University are the only schools from which multiple number-one overall draft picks have been chosen. No first overall pick was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame until 2016, when Ken Griffey Jr. was inducted with a record 99.3% of votes cast. Griffey has since been joined by two other top picks, with Chipper Jones inducted in 2018 and Harold Baines elected in December 2018 and awaiting formal induction in July 2019.In the 54 drafts that have taken place through 2018, 22 of the 30 MLB franchises have had the first pick at least once. The Toronto Blue Jays, St. Louis Cardinals, Los Angeles Dodgers, San Francisco Giants, Cleveland Indians, Cincinnati Reds, Boston Red Sox, and Colorado Rockies have never had the first pick. The Montreal Expos never had the first pick, but the Nationals have had it twice. The Oakland Athletics have never had the first pick, but the Kansas City Athletics had the very first pick in MLB Draft history. The New York Mets, San Diego Padres, and Houston Astros have each had the first pick five times, and the Seattle Mariners, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Tampa Bay Rays have each had the first pick four times.

Omer Muñoz

Omer Enrique (Molleda) Muñoz (born March 6, 1966 in Maracaibo, Venezuela) served as the interim first base coach for the Chicago White Sox in 2010 while Harold Baines recovered from right knee replacement surgery. He has also played, coached and managed in the minor leagues.

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