Hap Day

Clarence Henry "Happy" Day (June 14, 1901 – February 17, 1990), later known as Hap Day, was a Canadian professional hockey player who played 14 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Toronto Maple Leafs and New York Americans. Day enjoyed a 33-year career as a player, referee, coach and assistant general manager, 28 of which were spent in various capacities with the Maple Leafs. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1961.

His name appears on the Stanley Cup 7 times—1932 (as Captain), 1942, 1945, 1947, 1948, 1949 (as coach) and 1951 (as assistant manager); all with the Maple Leafs.

Hap Day
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1961
Born June 14, 1901
Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada
Died February 17, 1990 (aged 88)
St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Left
Played for Toronto St. Pats/Maple Leafs
New York Americans
Playing career 1924–1938

Career

Day was born in Owen Sound, Ontario. During his teenage years, his family moved to Port McNicoll, Ontario, a small village outside of Midland, Ontario. While developing his early hockey skills, Day skated with the Midland Juniors, and while attending Midland High School, wore the uniform of its hockey team. Legend has it that he'd often walk from Port McNicoll to Midland (approximately three kilometres away) in the winter, for games at the town's Casino Rink. He played for the Hamilton Tigers of the Ontario Hockey Association in 1922–23 and 1923–24, and then joined the varsity team at the University of Toronto, where he was enrolled as a pharmacy major. Day was persuaded to turn professional in 1924 by Charlie Querrie, owner of the Toronto St. Pats. He played left wing in his rookie season and then switched to defence, where he would remain for the rest of his career. He became team captain in 1926.

In 1927, the St. Pats were purchased by Conn Smythe and renamed the Toronto Maple Leafs. Smythe kept Day as team captain. He also became a partner in Smythe's sand and gravel business. After Smythe acquired star defenceman King Clancy from the Ottawa Senators in 1931, Day and Clancy formed one of the top defence pairings in the NHL. The team won the Stanley Cup in 1932. While still playing for the Leafs, Day became coach of the West Toronto Nationals OHA junior team and led them to a Memorial Cup victory in 1936. On September 23, 1937, Day was sold to the New York Americans and spent one season there before retiring as a player in 1938. His 11-year tenure as captain of the St. Pats/Maple Leafs is second only to George Armstrong.

Day worked as a referee for the next two years before returning to the Leafs as coach. He guided the team through the 1940s, winning the Stanley Cup five times in 10 seasons. He was the winningest coach in Maple Leafs history until Punch Imlach passed him; Day still ranks second on the franchise wins list behind Imlach.

Smythe promoted Day to assistant general manager in 1950. His name was engraved on the cup a 7th time in 1951. In 1955, Smythe gave Day control over most hockey operations, but remained general manager on paper.[1] Just after the Leafs were eliminated in the playoffs in March 1957, Day was publicly embarrassed by Smythe, who told the media that he didn't know if Day was available to return to the Leafs for the following season. Officially, Day resigned, but behind the scenes he had been pushed out and was replaced by a committee headed by Smythe's son Stafford Smythe.

Day retired to enter business life, running Elgin Handles in St. Thomas, Ontario[2] until selling it to his son in 1977. Day was almost convinced by Jack Kent Cooke to become the first general manager of the Los Angeles Kings in 1967, but he decided not to take the job, recommending Larry Regan instead.

Day died in St. Thomas at age 88 in 1990.[3] He and his number 4 were honoured (but not retired) by the Maple Leafs on October 4, 2006 at the Air Canada Centre. However, in 2016, the Maple Leafs retired his number, as part of their Centennial season celebrations.

Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1924–25 Toronto St. Pats NHL 26 10 12 22 27
1925–26 Toronto St. Pats NHL 36 14 2 16 26
1926–27 Toronto St. Pats/Leafs NHL 44 11 5 16 50
1927–28 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 27 9 8 17 48
1928–29 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 44 6 6 12 85 4 1 0 1 4
1929–30 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 43 7 14 21 77
1930–31 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 44 1 13 14 56 2 0 3 3 7
1931–32 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 47 7 8 15 33 7 3 3 6 6
1932–33 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 47 6 14 20 46 9 0 1 1 21
1933–34 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 48 9 10 19 35 5 0 0 0 6
1934–35 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 45 2 4 6 38 7 0 0 0 4
1935–36 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 44 1 13 14 41 9 0 0 0 8
1936–37 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 48 3 4 7 20 2 0 0 0 0
1937–38 New York Americans NHL 43 0 3 3 14 6 0 0 0 0
NHL totals 586 86 116 202 596 51 4 7 11 56

Coaching record

Team Year Regular season Post season
G W L T Pts Finish Result
TOR 1940–41 48 28 14 6 62 2nd in NHL Lost in first round
TOR 1941–42 48 27 18 3 57 2nd in NHL Won Stanley Cup
TOR 1942–43 50 22 19 9 53 3rd in NHL Lost in first round
TOR 1943–44 50 23 23 4 50 3rd in NHL Lost in first round
TOR 1944–45 50 24 22 4 52 3rd in NHL Won Stanley Cup
TOR 1945–46 50 19 24 7 45 5th in NHL Did not qualify
TOR 1946–47 60 31 19 10 72 2nd in NHL Won Stanley Cup
TOR 1947–48 60 32 15 13 77 1st in NHL Won Stanley Cup
TOR 1948–49 60 22 25 13 57 4th in NHL Won Stanley Cup
TOR 1949–50 70 31 27 12 74 3rd in NHL Lost in first round
Total 546 259 206 81

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 3, 2007. Retrieved June 5, 2007.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ http://t-j.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?archive=true&e=1889782
  3. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/1990/02/18/obituaries/clarence-hap-day-hockey-coach-88.html?pagewanted=1

External links

Preceded by
Bert Corbeau
Toronto Maple Leafs captain
192737
Succeeded by
Charlie Conacher
Preceded by
Dick Irvin
Head Coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs
194050
Succeeded by
Joe Primeau
Preceded by
Conn Smythe
General manager of the Toronto Maple Leafs
195557 (shared with Conn Smythe)
Succeeded by
Stafford Smythe (de facto)
1924–25 Toronto St. Patricks season

The 1924–25 Toronto St. Patricks season was Toronto's eighth in the National Hockey League (NH). The St. Pats qualified for the playoffs, finishing second. The St. Pats lost to the Montreal Canadiens in what turned out to be the NHL championship when Hamilton was suspended..

1927–28 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1927–28 Toronto Maple Leafs season was the first under the Maple Leafs name for the Toronto National Hockey League (NHL) franchise. The club finished in fourth to miss the playoffs again.

1931–32 NHL season

The 1931–32 NHL season was the 15th season of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Ottawa Senators and Philadelphia Quakers suspended operations, leaving eight teams to play 48 games each. In the Stanley Cup Finals, the Toronto Maple Leafs swept the New York Rangers in three games to win the franchise's third Stanley Cup championship.

1932–33 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1932–33 Toronto Maple Leafs season was Toronto's 16th season in the National Hockey League (NHL).

1933–34 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1933–34 Toronto Maple Leafs season was Toronto's 17th season in the National Hockey League (NHL).

1934–35 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1934–35 Toronto Maple Leafs season was Toronto's 18th season of play in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Maple Leafs placed first in the Canadian Division, and won two playoff series to advance to the Stanley Cup final, only to lose to the Montreal Maroons.

1935–36 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1935–36 Toronto Maple Leafs season was Toronto's 19th season in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Maple Leafs made it to the Stanley Cup Final, losing 3–1 to the Detroit Red Wings.

1936–37 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1936–37 Toronto Maple Leafs season was the 20th season of play for the Toronto NHL franchise, tenth as the Maple Leafs.

1945 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1945 Stanley Cup Finals was a best-of-seven series between the Detroit Red Wings and the Toronto Maple Leafs. The Maple Leafs won the series by four games to three--although not before they blew a 3-0 lead to the Red Wings, who nearly served them a taste of their own medicine.

1948 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1948 Stanley Cup Finals was a best-of-seven series between the Detroit Red Wings and the defending champion Toronto Maple Leafs. The Maple Leafs won the series in four straight games to win their second consecutive Stanley Cup.

1949 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1949 Stanley Cup Finals was a best-of-seven series between the Detroit Red Wings and the defending champion Toronto Maple Leafs, the second straight final series between Detroit and Toronto. The Maple Leafs won the series in four straight games to win their third consecutive Stanley Cup and eighth in the history of the franchise.

1951 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1951 Stanley Cup Finals was contested by the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Montreal Canadiens. The Maple Leafs would win the series 4–1, with all five games going into overtime. It was the Toronto franchise's ninth Stanley Cup win and the last in a series of six wins starting in 1942. It was the first appearance in a string of ten consecutive appearances by the Canadiens.

Happy Day

Happy Day may refer to:

The Happy Day, a 1916 musical comedy

Happy Day (album), a 2008 album by Tim Hughes

"The Happy Day" (Ashes to Ashes), an episode of Ashes to Ashes

Hap Day (1901–1990), Canadian professional hockey player

Yawm Said (Happy Day), a 1939 Egyptian film

"Happy Day", a 1994 song by house musical duo Uncanny Alliance

"Happy Day", a song by Talking Heads from their 1977 album Talking Heads: 77

"Happy Day" (Lizi Pop song), 2014

Happy Day (1939 film), an Egyptian film

List of National Hockey League retired numbers

This is a complete list of numbers retired by the National Hockey League (NHL). A retired number is a jersey number that is taken out of circulation by a team as a way of honouring a former member of that team who wore that number; after the number's retirement, members of that team are not permitted to wear the number on their jerseys unless by permission of the original number holder.

The first team to retire a number was the Toronto Maple Leafs, which retired Ace Bailey's number 6 on February 14, 1934, prior to an All-Star game organized in his honour.

Currently in the NHL, there are 128 retired numbers, 7 former retirements, and 23 honoured numbers. Most of the numbers retired by the Hartford Whalers and Quebec Nordiques were put back in circulation when those franchises relocated and became the Carolina Hurricanes and Colorado Avalanche, respectively, although the Hurricanes keep Gordie Howe's number 9 unofficially retired. The Minnesota North Stars' two retired numbers were carried over when that franchise relocated to become the Dallas Stars, and remain retired today. The Arizona Coyotes had a policy of retaining the numbers retired when the franchise was the Winnipeg Jets but reversed it after the Phoenix Coyotes were sold and became the Arizona Coyotes. Honoured numbers are similar to retired numbers, except that they remain available for use by other players. Presently, only the Calgary Flames, and the St. Louis Blues employ this designation. The Philadelphia Flyers have also unofficially retired number 31 in honour of goaltender Pelle Lindbergh since his death in 1985.

Wayne Gretzky's number 99 has been retired league-wide in 2000, although the Edmonton Oilers and Los Angeles Kings separately retired Gretzky's number.

Upon joining the league in 2000, the Minnesota Wild had a ceremony retiring number 1 from circulation as a tribute to their fans.

Twelve numbers have been retired by a team in honour of two different players: number 12 by the Montreal Canadiens for Dickie Moore and Yvan Cournoyer, number 16 by the Montreal Canadiens for Elmer Lach and Henri Richard, number 3 by the Chicago Blackhawks for Pierre Pilote and Keith Magnuson, number 5 by the Canadiens for Bernie Geoffrion and Guy Lapointe, number 9 by the New York Rangers for Andy Bathgate and Adam Graves, number 1 by the Toronto Maple Leafs for Johnny Bower and Turk Broda, number 4 by the Maple Leafs for Hap Day and Red Kelly, number 7 by the Maple Leafs for King Clancy and Tim Horton, number 9 by the Maple Leafs for Charlie Conacher and Ted Kennedy, number 10 by the Maple Leafs for Syl Apps and George Armstrong, and number 27 by the Maple Leafs for Frank Mahovlich and Darryl Sittler, and number 11 by the Rangers for Vic Hadfield and Mark Messier.

Only nine players have had their number retired by two different NHL teams:

Bobby Hull – Chicago Blackhawks and Winnipeg Jets/Arizona Coyotes

Gordie Howe – Detroit Red Wings and Hartford Whalers/Carolina Hurricanes

Wayne Gretzky – Edmonton Oilers and Los Angeles Kings (also retired league-wide)

Ray Bourque – Boston Bruins and Colorado Avalanche

Mark Messier – New York Rangers and Edmonton Oilers

Patrick Roy – Colorado Avalanche and Montreal Canadiens

Tim Horton – Buffalo Sabres and Toronto Maple Leafs

Red Kelly – Detroit Red Wings and Toronto Maple Leafs

Scott Niedermayer – Anaheim Ducks and New Jersey Devils

List of Stanley Cup champions

The Stanley Cup is a trophy awarded annually to the playoff champion club of the National Hockey League (NHL) ice hockey league. It was donated by the Governor General of Canada Lord Stanley of Preston in 1892, and is the oldest professional sports trophy in North America. Inscribed the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup, the trophy was first awarded to Canada's amateur ice hockey clubs who won the trophy as the result of challenge games and league play. Professional clubs came to dominate the competition in the early years of the twentieth century, and in 1913 the two major professional ice hockey organizations, the National Hockey Association (NHA) (forerunner of the NHL) and the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA), reached a gentlemen's agreement in which their respective champions would face each other in an annual series for the Stanley Cup. After a series of league mergers and folds, it became the de facto championship trophy of the NHL in 1926, though it was nominally still subject to external challenge. After 1947, the Cup became the de jure NHL championship prize.

From 1914 to the end of the 2018 season, the trophy has been won 100 times. 24 teams have won the cup, 19 of which are still active in the NHL. Prior to that, the challenge cup was held by nine teams. The Montreal Canadiens have won the Stanley Cup 24 times and made the finals an additional ten times. There were two years when the Stanley Cup was not awarded: 1919, because of the Spanish flu epidemic, and 2005, because of the NHL lockout.

List of Toronto Maple Leafs award winners

This is a list of award winners of the Toronto Maple Leafs and predecessor clubs of the Toronto NHL franchise.

List of Toronto Maple Leafs general managers

The Toronto Maple Leafs are a professional ice hockey team based in Toronto, Ontario. They are members of the Atlantic Division in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL) and are known as one of the Original Six teams of the league. Founded in 1917, the club had no nickname in their first season, and were known as the Toronto Arenas for their second season. From the 1919–20 season they were known as the Toronto St. Patricks, until in February 1927 when the club was purchased by Conn Smythe. Smythe changed the name of the club to the Maple Leafs and they have been known by that name ever since. The franchise has had sixteen general managers since their inception.

List of Toronto Maple Leafs head coaches

The Toronto Maple Leafs are a professional ice hockey team based in Toronto, Ontario. The team is a member of the Atlantic Division in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL) and is one of the Original Six teams of the NHL. There have been 39 head coaches in their franchise history; one during the era of the Toronto Arenas (1917–1919), seven during the era of the Toronto St. Patricks (1919–1927) and the rest under the Toronto Maple Leafs (1927–present). Five Maple Leafs coaches have been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame as players: Dick Irvin, Joe Primeau, King Clancy, Red Kelly, and Dick Duff while five others have been inducted as builders: Conn Smythe, Hap Day, Punch Imlach, Roger Neilson, and Pat Quinn.Frank Carroll has the highest winning percentage of any Maple Leafs coach, with a .625 record from the 24 games he coached from 1920 to 1921. Neither Mike Rodden nor interim coach Dick Duff, who coached only two games each in 1927 and 1980 respectively, won a game with the team. Dan Maloney has the worst record of any who coached more than a season, with a .328 winning percentage from 160 games. Punch Imlach coached the most games of any Maple Leafs coach with 750 games from 1959 to 1969. Pat Burns is the franchise's only coach to win the Jack Adams Award awarded to the head coach "adjudged to have contributed the most to his team's success." Pat Quinn also won the award, but with two teams prior to coaching the Maple Leafs.Interim head coach Peter Horachek succeeded Randy Carlyle with 42 games left in the 2014-2015 season, and was then fired when the regular season ended.

On May 20, 2015, the Toronto Maple Leafs announced that they had hired Mike Babcock as the 39th head coach in franchise history and had signed him to a groundbreaking 8-year $50-million contract, becoming the highest paid NHL coach in history.

Red Horner

George Reginald "Red" Horner (May 28, 1909 – April 27, 2005) was an ice hockey defenceman for the Toronto Maple Leafs of the National Hockey League from 1928 to 1940. He was the Leafs captain from 1938 until his retirement. He helped the Leafs win their third Stanley Cup in 1932. Horner was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1965.

Born in Lynden, Ontario, Horner spent all of his time playing in Toronto, Ontario. As a junior player, he played for the Toronto Marlboros of the Ontario Hockey League. In his NHL career, Horner had the role of enforcer and retired with 42 goals, 110 assists and 1,264 penalty minutes in 490 regular season games. His election to the Hall of Fame has been controversial, as he never before his final two seasons was regarded as even the best defenceman on his own team—his contemporaries for most of his career were the Hall of Famers King Clancy and Hap Day, who were—and seems to rest more on his unprecedented and unequaled seven seasons as the NHL penalty minute leader. He retired the league's all-time penalty minute leader, a mark he held until Ted Lindsay broke it in the late Fifties.

After retiring from hockey in 1940, Horner lived in Florida, and Toronto, where he became involved in business ventures for several companies including the Elias Rogers Fuels Limited and the Canada Coal Company Limited, where he later became President before retiring. On February 13, 1999, Horner was involved in the opening ceremonies for the 65th anniversary of Maple Leaf Gardens and its closing the same day. Horner was also involved in the opening of the Air Canada Centre.

Horner was the last surviving member of Toronto's 1932 Stanley Cup team.

Horner was the oldest living NHL player at the time of his death in Toronto, Ontario and was later interred in Mount Hope Catholic Cemetery in Toronto.

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