Hank Sauer

Henry John Sauer (March 17, 1917 – August 24, 2001) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball. From 1941 through 1959, Sauer played for the Cincinnati Reds (1941–42, 1945, 1948–49), Chicago Cubs (1949–55), St. Louis Cardinals (1956), New York Giants (1957) and San Francisco Giants (1958–59). He batted and threw right-handed. He and Johnny Bench are the only players in major league history ever to have hit three home runs in a single game twice against the same pitcher. He did it 1950 and 1952 while with the Chicago Cubs, both times against Philadelphia's Curt Simmons.

In a 15-season career, Sauer was a .266 hitter with 288 home runs and 876 RBIs in 1399 games.

Hank Sauer
Hank Sauer 1948
Sauer in 1948
Left fielder
Born: March 17, 1917
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Died: August 24, 2001 (aged 84)
Burlingame, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 9, 1941, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
August 17, 1959, for the San Francisco Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.266
Home runs288
Runs batted in876
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Sauer started his major league career with the Reds in 1941, and was traded to the Cubs midway through the 1949 season.

Hank Sauer 1953.jpeg
Sauer in about 1953

A two-time All-Star, Sauer was a feared slugger for the Cubs in the early 1950s, hitting over 30 home runs in six seasons, with a career-high 41 in 1954. His most productive season came in 1952, when he led the National League in home runs (37) and RBIs (121), and was named the Most Valuable Player.

During a time when the Cubs were especially moribund, Sauer provided some joy for the team's fans with his power hitting, earning him the nickname "The Mayor of Wrigley Field". He was well known for using smokeless tobacco, and it has often been reported that after he hit a home run, when he returned to his left field position, bleacher fans might shower him with packets of his favorite chew, Beech Nut tobacco.

Sauer was not especially fleet afoot. In contrast to radio's Quiz Kids or the 1950 Phillies "Whiz Kids", according to Chicago columnist Mike Royko the 1950s Cubs had an outfield "that was so slow they were known as the Quicksand Kids." Sauer, Frank Baumholtz and Ralph Kiner played left, center and right fields respectively. (One More Time: The Best of Mike Royko, University of Chicago, 1999, p. 29-31)

In 1955, Sauer tried to hold out for a bigger contract for the Cubs, but was released. A year later, he played with the Cardinals and finished with the Giants in 1959.

Sauer died of a heart attack while playing golf in Burlingame, California at the age of 84.

See also

External links

1940 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1940 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball that represented the Cincinnati Reds. Cincinnati entered the season as the reigning National League champions, having been swept by the New York Yankees in the World Series. Cincinnati won 100 games for the first time in franchise history. The team went 100-53 during the season, best in MLB. The team finished first in the National League with a record of 100–53, winning the pennant by 12 games over the Brooklyn Dodgers. They went on to face the Detroit Tigers in the 1940 World Series, beating them in seven games. This was their first championship since 1919.

1940 New York Yankees season

The 1940 New York Yankees season was the team's 38th season in New York and its 40th overall. The team finished in third place with a record of 88–66, finishing two games behind the American League champion Detroit Tigers and one game behind the second-place Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. Their home games were played at the Yankee Stadium.

1945 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1945 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 61–93, 37 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1948 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1948 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 64–89, 27 games behind the Boston Braves. This season was the first wherein the Reds were broadcast on television all over Cincinnati via WLWT, with a television simulcast of the radio commentary from WCPO with Waite Hoyt on the booth.

1949 Chicago Cubs season

The 1949 Chicago Cubs season was the 78th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 74th in the National League and the 34th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 61–93.

1949 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1949 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 62–92, 35 games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers.

1950 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1950 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 17th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1950, at Comiskey Park in Chicago the home of the Chicago White Sox of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 4–3 in 14 innings. It was the first All-Star game to go into extra innings.

1952 Chicago Cubs season

The 1952 Chicago Cubs season was the 81st season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 77th in the National League and the 37th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 77–77. Starting from this season, WGN was the exclusive television broadcast partner of the Cubs franchise with the transfer of WBKB ownership to CBS.

1952 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1952 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 19th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 8, 1952, at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania the home of the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 3–2 in 5 innings. It was the first All-Star Game—and to date, the only—to be called early due to rain.

Mickey Mantle was selected an All-Star for the first time, as was pitcher Satchel Paige, who a day before the game turned 46 years old. Neither appeared in the game.

1952 Major League Baseball season

The 1952 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 15 to October 7, 1952. The Braves were playing their final season in Boston, before the team relocated to Milwaukee the following year, thus, ending fifty seasons without any MLB team relocating.

1952 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1952 throughout the world.

1956 Chicago Cubs season

The 1956 Chicago Cubs season was the 85th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 81st in the National League and the 41st at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 60–94.

1956 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1956 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 75th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 65th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 76–78 during the season and finished 4th in the National League.

1957 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1957 New York Giants season involved the team finishing in sixth place in the National League with a 69–85 record, 26 games behind the NL and World Champion Milwaukee Braves. It was the team's 75th and final season in New York City before its relocation to San Francisco, California for the following season. The last game at their stadium, the Polo Grounds, was played on September 29 against the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1957 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1957 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 76th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 66th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 87–67 during the season and finished second in the National League, eight games behind the Milwaukee Braves.

1959 San Francisco Giants season

The 1959 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 77th year in Major League Baseball and their second year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season. The team finished in third place in the National League with an 83-71 record, 4 games behind the World Champion Los Angeles Dodgers. It was the team's second and final season at Seals Stadium before moving their games to Candlestick Park the following season.

Butler Tigers

The Butler Tigers were a Pennsylvania State Association (1935–1942) and Middle Atlantic League (1946–1951) baseball team based in Butler, Pennsylvania. The team was founded in 1935, as the Butler Indians, an affiliate of the Cleveland Indians. They began their affiliation with the New York Yankees the following season, as the Butler Yankees.

They lasted ten seasons as the Yankees, and won league championships in five of those years. The first two came in 1937 and 1938 under manager Ernie Jenkins. The next two occurred in 1940 and 1941 under Thomas Kain and the third occurred in 1942 under Dallas Warren. In 1949 the team became the Butler Tigers, as an affiliate of the Detroit Tigers. In 1951, the team became an affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates.Notable players include Bob Grim, Joe Page, Hank Sauer and Hall of Famer Whitey Ford.

Ed Sauer

Edward Sauer (January 3, 1919 – July 1, 1988) was an American professional baseball player. An outfielder, he appeared in 189 Major League games in 1943–1945 and in 1949 for the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals and Boston Braves. He stood 6 feet (1.8 m) tall, weighed 188 pounds (85 kg) and threw and batted right-handed.

The younger brother of slugger Hank Sauer, Ed was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and attended Elon College. His pro career extended for a dozen years, 1940 through 1951. He was a member of the pennant-winning 1945 Cubs and appeared as a pinch hitter twice (in games 5 and 7) during the 1945 World Series, striking out each time against Baseball Hall of Fame left-handed pitcher Hal Newhouser.During his Major League career, Sauer collected 117 hits, including 25 doubles, two triples and five home runs.

John Pyecha

John Nicholas Pyecha (born November 25, 1931) is an American former professional baseball player. He was a 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m), 200 lb (91 kg) right-handed pitcher who played six seasons (1950–1955) of minor league baseball, but made only one Major League appearance for the 1954 Chicago Cubs.

On April 24, 1954, at Crosley Field, Pyecha entered the game in relief of Warren Hacker in the seventh inning with his Cubs trailing the Cincinnati Redlegs 3–2. Pyecha held the Redlegs off the scoreboard in the seventh and eighth innings; meanwhile, Chicago rallied to take a 5–3 lead thanks to home runs by Ralph Kiner and Hank Sauer. Pyecha started the last half of the ninth inning by issuing a base on balls to Gus Bell, then retired Jim Greengrass and Ted Kluszewski to get within one out of the victory. But Johnny Temple singled to bring the winning run to the plate, and Wally Post hit a three-run walk-off home run to win the game for the Redlegs. In his lone MLB game, Pyecha allowed four hits and two bases on balls, with two strikeouts, in 2⅔ innings pitched.

Pyecha spent the remainder of 1954 with the Los Angeles Angels of the Pacific Coast League, and retired after the 1955 season having pitched in 154 minor league games.

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