Hank Greenwald

Howard "Hank" Greenwald (June 26, 1935 — October 22, 2018) was a Major League Baseball announcer, known best for being a play-by-play announcer for the San Francisco Giants.

Biography

Early career

Greenwald changed his name from Howard to Hank to honor Detroit Tigers Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg. He began his broadcasting career calling football games for his alma mater Syracuse University. He was also a broadcaster for the former NBA team, the Syracuse Nationals.[1] In the 1960s, he broadcast Hawaii Islanders baseball in the Pacific Coast League.

San Francisco Giants (first and second stints) and the New York Yankees

Greenwald began calling games for the Giants in 1979, but ended this stint in 1986, after Greenwald had a disagreement with station management.[2] After joining the New York Yankees radio broadcast team for the next two seasons, Greenwald returned to the Giants in 1989 when the team reached the World Series. Greenwald later expressed resentment toward Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, saying "Steinbrenner is everything you've heard, maybe worse."[2]

He remained in San Francisco until 1996, when he announced his retirement. At the time he retired, Greenwald had announced 2,798 consecutive games.[2] In his book This Copyrighted Broadcast, Greenwald cites disagreements with Giants' Vice President Larry Baer as his reason for retiring.[3] The Giants hired former Baltimore Orioles and ESPN announcer Jon Miller as Greenwald's replacement.[3]

Perhaps Hank Greenwald's most memorable call was his emotional description of the final out in Game 5 of the 1989 National League Championship Series[4] (which sent the San Francisco Giants to the World Series for the first time since 1962).

Twenty-seven years of waiting have come to an end! The Giants have won the pennant!

This came after Greenwald called Giants first baseman Will Clark's pennant clinching hit off of Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Mitch Williams in the bottom of the eighth inning:

And Clark hits it up the middle, into center-field, base hit!!! Maldonado scores! Here comes Butler...on his way to third is Thompson, the Giants lead three to one!!! And Superman has done it again!

CBS Radio

In 1997, Greenwald was employed by the CBS Radio network as a baseball announcer, calling Saturday Game of the Week broadcasts as well as the NLDS between the Giants and Florida Marlins.

Oakland Athletics

In 2004, Greenwald was hired as a television play-by-play announcer for the Oakland Athletics working about 1/3 of the team's telecasts with analyst Ray Fosse. He announced games for the A's in the 2004 and 2005 seasons.

Other San Francisco Bay Area assignments

Greenwald also has called basketball play-by-play for the Golden State Warriors (with legendary announcer Bill King) and the University of San Francisco Dons.

Doug Greenwald

His son Doug, named after General Douglas MacArthur,[2] is the play-by-play announcer for the Fresno Grizzlies, formerly the Giants' AAA affiliate and now the Houston Astros' affiliate. He also has announced baseball and women's basketball for the Santa Clara Broncos.[5][6] His first game announcing for the major league Giants was on September 6, 2009; he filled in for regular announcer Dave Flemming, whose wife was expected to give birth.[7] Most recently, he also had to fill in for both Flemming and fellow broadcaster Jon Miller during a July 23–25, 2010 series against the Arizona Diamondbacks since Miller had to go up to Cooperstown to receive the Ford C. Frick Award, and Flemming also had to be there to support him after Flemming solely called the first game on July 22. Like Flemming, Doug solely called the remaining three games on the radio accompanied by color commentator J. T. Snow. Greenwald called the play-by-play alongside Randy Winn for the San Francisco Giants game on the June 14, 2015 broadcast on KNBR.

Footnotes

  1. ^ Retrieved December 24, 2007 "Hank Greenwald" Autographed to You
  2. ^ a b c d Schott, Tom, and Nick Peters. The Giants Encyclopedia. Sports LLC, 2003. 264.
  3. ^ a b Walsh, J. (1999, Oct 7) . Retrieved December 24, 2007 "Talking baseball with Hank Greenwald" Salon
  4. ^ Giants Clubhouse: Postseason '89
  5. ^ Jenkins, Bruce. "Doug Greenwald: Here Comes the Son." San Francisco Chronicle 26 Aug. 2003. 24 Dec. 2007 [1]
  6. ^ http://www.santaclarabroncos.com/sports/w-baskbl/2013-14/releases/20130904cr27cr
  7. ^ Marek Warszawski (2009, September 6) . Retrieved September 6, 2009 "Greenwald gets called up, too" Archived 2009-09-19 at the Wayback Machine FresnoBeehive.com
1980 San Francisco Giants season

The 1980 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 98th season in Major League Baseball, their 23rd season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 21st at Candlestick Park. The team finished in fifth place in the National League West with a 75-86 record, 17 games behind the Houston Astros.

1981 San Francisco Giants season

The 1981 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 99th season in Major League Baseball, their 24th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 22nd at Candlestick Park. Giants manager Frank Robinson became the first black manager in the history of the National League. Robinson was also the first black manager in the history of the American League.

1982 San Francisco Giants season

The 1982 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 100th season in Major League Baseball, their 25th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 23rd at Candlestick Park. The team finished in third place in the National League West with an 87–75 record, 2 games behind the Atlanta Braves.

1983 San Francisco Giants season

The 1983 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 101st season in Major League Baseball, their 26th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 24th at Candlestick Park. The team finished in fifth place in the National League West with a 79–83 record, 12 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1984 San Francisco Giants season

The 1984 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 102nd season in Major League Baseball, their 27th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 25th at Candlestick Park. The team finished in sixth place in the National League West with a 66-96 record, 26 games behind the San Diego Padres.

1985 San Francisco Giants season

The 1985 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 103rd season in Major League Baseball, their 28th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 26th at Candlestick Park. It resulted in the team finishing in sixth place in the NL West Division with a record of 62 wins and franchise-record 100 losses. This was the first, and as of 2017, the only time in the history of the franchise that they reached the triple-digit mark in losses. It is also the highest number of games they have lost in a season, as well. The Giants were managed by Jim Davenport, who was dismissed on September 18, after compiling a dismal 56-88 record, and Roger Craig, who guided the team to a 6-12 mark during the final 2½ weeks of the season. They finished 33 games behind the division champion and main rival, the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1986 San Francisco Giants season

The 1986 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 104th season in Major League Baseball, their 29th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 27th at Candlestick Park. The team finished in third place in the National League West with an 83-79 record, 13 games behind the Houston Astros.

1988 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1988 season was the 86th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 85-76, finishing in fifth place, 3.5 games behind the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Lou Piniella and Billy Martin, with the latter managing the team for the fifth and final time. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1990 San Francisco Giants season

The 1990 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 108th season in Major League Baseball, their 33rd season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 31st at Candlestick Park. The team finished in third place in the National League West with an 85-77 record, 6 games behind the Cincinnati Reds.

1991 San Francisco Giants season

The 1991 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 109th season in Major League Baseball, their 34th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 32nd at Candlestick Park. The team finished in fourth place in the National League West with a 75-87 record, 19 games behind the Atlanta Braves.

1992 San Francisco Giants season

The 1992 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 110th season in Major League Baseball, their 35th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 33rd at Candlestick Park. The team finished in fifth place in the National League West with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses.

This year, Giants owner Bob Lurie agreed in principle to sell his team to a Tampa Bay-based group of investors led by Vince Naimoli, who would then move the team to St. Petersburg. However, in November 1992, National League owners nixed the move under pressure from San Francisco officials, and the Giants were sold to a group that kept them in San Francisco.

1994 San Francisco Giants season

The 1994 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 112th season in Major League Baseball, their 37th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 35th at Candlestick Park. After winning 103 games in 1993, the Giants record dropped to 55-60 in a strike-shortened season. This was also the season in which Matt Williams hit a career high 43 home runs through 115 games by the time the strike hit, on pace to finish with 61; had the season continued, Williams may have had a chance to break Roger Maris's then-single season record of 61 home runs set in 1961.

2004 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 2004 season involved the A's finishing 2nd in the American League West with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses.

Greenwald

Greenwald is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Alex Greenwald (born 1979), American musician and actor

Andy Greenwald (born 1977), social commentator, specifically about popular music

Bruce Greenwald (born 1946), American economist

Glenn Greenwald (born 1967), attorney, journalist, blogger, author of books, NSA critic

Hank Greenwald (born 1935), former baseball announcer

Herbert Greenwald (1915–1959), real estate developer associated with Mies Van Der Rohe

Jeff Greenwald (born 1954), author, performer, and Executive Director of Ethical Traveler

Louis Greenwald (born 1967), New Jersey, USA politician

Maggie Greenwald (born 1955), American film director and writer

Michael Greenwald, birth name of Michael Kidd (1915–2007), American film and stage choreographer

Nora Greenwald (born 1977), also known as Molly Holly, American professional wrestler

Robert Greenwald (born 1945), American film director, film producer, and political activist

Rabbi Moshe Greenwald (1853–1911), Rabbi of Chust, Hungary, and author of Arugas Habosem

Rabbi Eliezer David Greenwald (1867-1928), Rabbi of Satmar, and author of Keren LeDovid

Rabbi Yaakov Yechezkiya Greenwald (1882-1941), Rabbi of Pápa, Hugary and author of Vayageid Yaakov

Leopold Greenwald (1888–1955), Rav, Congregation Beth Jacob, Columbus, Ohio

Rabbi Yosef Greenwald (1903-1984), Grand Rebbe of Pupa and author of Vaychi Yosef

Rabbi Yaakov Yechezkia Greenwald II, (b. 1948), present Grand Rebbe of Pupa, Williamsburg, Brooklyn

List of New York Yankees broadcasters

As one of the most successful clubs in Major League Baseball, the New York Yankees are also one of its oldest teams. Part of that success derives to its radio and television broadcasts that have been running beginning in 1939 when the first radio transmissions were broadcast from the old stadium, and from 1947 when television broadcasts began. They have been one of the pioneer superstation broadcasts when WPIX became a national superstation in 1978 and were the first American League team to broadcast their games on cable, both first in 1978 and later on in 1979, when Sportschannel NY (now MSG Plus) began broadcasting Yankees games to cable subscribers. Today, the team can be heard and/or seen in its gameday broadcasts during the baseball season on:

TV: YES Network or WPIX channel 11 in New York

Radio: WFAN 660AM and WFAN-FM 101.9 FM in New York; New York Yankees Radio Network; WADO 1280 AM (Spanish) (Cadena Radio Yankees)Longest serving Yankee broadcasters (all-time with 10+ years)

Phil Rizzuto (40 yrs), John Sterling (31 yrs), Mel Allen (30 yrs), Michael Kay (28 yrs), Bobby Murcer (22 yrs), Ken Singleton (23 yrs), Frank Messer (18 yrs), Bill White (18 yrs), Suzyn Waldman (15 yrs), Red Barber (13 yrs), Jim Kaat (13 yrs), Al Trautwig (12 yrs)

Nicole Sawaya

Nicole Sawaya (1952-06-14–2018-10-18) was the Lebanese-American former Executive Director of the Pacifica Radio Network.

Sawaya started her career as a news reporter before moving into radio management.

Moving from San Francisco to Anderson Valley in Mendocino County, Nicole was also for a period in the 1990s Program Director at community radio station KZYX-KZYZ, Philo, CA.

In July 1999 she was controversially fired as general manager of KPFA-FM, the first public radio station in the US and the flagship station of the Pacifica Network. This led to what has been called the Pacifica Crisis, which involved the largest demonstrations seen in Berkeley, California, since the end of the Vietnam War, more than 10,000 people marching to demand community control of KPFA. She was hired by Pacifica as Executive Director of the network on September 30, 2007, commencing work in November. She resigned in early December 2007 due to the "level of internecine dysfunction.". She resumed the Executive Director position on March 5, 2008, taking over from interim ED Dan Siegel. Nicole died on October 11, 2018 from complications due to cancer.

WAER

WAER (88.3 FM) is a radio station in Syracuse, New York. It is located on the campus of Syracuse University, and is an auxiliary service of the school. The station features a jazz music and National Public Radio format, with a news and music staff providing programming around the clock. It is best known for its sports staff, which has produced the likes of Bob Costas, Marv Albert, Dick Stockton, Mike Tirico, Sean McDonough, Bill Roth, Ian Eagle, Brian Higgins, Adam Schein, Hank Greenwald, Dave O'Brien (sportscaster), Andy Musser, Beth Mowins, Andrew Catalon, Carter Blackburn, Dave Pasch, Cory Provus, Jason Benetti, Todd Kalas and many others. Lou Reed also hosted a free-format show on WAER during his time at Syracuse University; this free-format radio tradition at Syracuse is carried on by WERW. Other alums include Ted Koppel, Jerry Stiller and Dick Clark.

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