Hank Bruder

Henry George "Hank" Bruder Jr. (November 22, 1907 – June 29, 1970) was an American football player in the National Football League. He played nine years with the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1939 and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Bruder attended Northwestern University, where he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity.[1][2]

He was part of the offensive line that blocked for Pro Football Hall of Fame back Johnny "Blood" McNally.

Hank Bruder
Position:Guard
Personal information
Born:November 22, 1907
Pekin, Illinois
Died:June 29, 1970 (aged 62)
Mattoon, Illinois
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:199 lb (90 kg)
Career information
High school:Pekin (IL)
College:Northwestern
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ http://www.retronaut.co/2012/05/packers-v-cardinals-official-program-1939/
  2. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/B/BrudHa20.htm

External links

1928 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1928 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1928 Big Ten Conference football season.

1930 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1930 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1930 Big Ten Conference football season.

1939 Green Bay Packers season

The 1939 Green Bay Packers season was their 21st season overall and their 19th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–2 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by beating the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game 27–0, earning the Packers their fifth NFL Championship and the first title game shutout ever recorded.

1940 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 1940 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the team's 8th in the National Football League. It was also the first season in which the team was known as the Pittsburgh Steelers, and not the copycat "Pirates" moniker.

The 1940 team was led by head coach Walt Kiesling in his first full season as the head coach. Kiesling's assistant coaches were Wilbur "Bill" Sortet and Hank Bruder, who both also played.

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Nate Barragar

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Willie James Buchanon (born November 4, 1950) is a former cornerback for the National Football League's Green Bay Packers and San Diego Chargers; he was defensive rookie of the year in 1972 and a two-time Pro Bowl player. He finished his career with his hometown San Diego Chargers, retiring with 28 career interceptions and 15 fumble recoveries.

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