Halton Borough Council

Halton Borough Council is the local authority for the Borough of Halton, incorporating the towns of Runcorn and Widnes and the parishes of Daresbury, Hale, Moore and Preston Brook. It is a constituent council of Liverpool City Region Combined Authority.[1]

Halton Borough Council
Halton Borough Council logo
Type
Type
History
Founded1 April 1974
Leadership
Mayor of Halton
Cllr Margaret Horabin, Labour
since 17 May 2019
Leader of the Council
Cllr Rob Polhill, Labour
since 21 May 2010
Chief Executive
David Parr
since June 2004
Structure
Seats56 councillors
Svgfiles 2019-05-03-17-23-33-565648-2129352936213180788 (1)
Political groups
Administration
     Labour Party (51)
Other Parties
     Liberal Democrats (3)
     Conservative Party (2)
Joint committees
Liverpool City Region Combined Authority
Elections
Plurality-at-large
Last election
3 May 2018
Motto
Latin: Industria Navem Implet
(Industry fills the ship)
Meeting place
Halton Grange, Runcorn
Runcorn Town Hall
Website
www.halton.gov.uk

History

Although Halton dates back to the 12th century (and beyond) when land on both sides of the river belonged to the Barony of Halton, the origin of the District Council was the outcome of the local government commission's suggested reforms of England, in 1969, the Redcliffe-Maud Report. This proposed to create metropolitan counties constituted of metropolitan district councils in the most urbanised parts of England. The model was that of the London Boroughs and Greater London Council formed in 1965. Southern Lancashire and northern Cheshire were among these urban areas, and two new metropolitan Counties were to be formed around Liverpool (as Merseyside) and Manchester (as Greater Manchester). However, the towns of Widnes and Runcorn (and the County Borough of Warrington) which lay between these were reluctant to join either. The Commission agreed that Halton and Warrington would become districts within Cheshire, as they would be detached from Lancashire by the two new metropolitan counties controlling the territory to the north.

The district was formally established on 1 April 1974 from Runcorn urban district and part of Runcorn Rural District from Cheshire, and the borough of Widnes and the parish of Hale from the Whiston Rural District in Lancashire. On 1 April 1998 Halton became an independent unitary authority, though it is still served by Cheshire Police and Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service, and forms part of Cheshire for ceremonial purposes, such as the Lord Lieutenancy.

On 1 April 2014 Halton became part of the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority, joining the local authorities of Liverpool, Sefton, Wirral, Knowsley and St Helens, the five metropolitan district councils which constitute the county of Merseyside. This effectively reverses the position adopted in the 1970s which created it as an anomaly. As a unitary authority its status is similar to the metropolitan district councils.[2]

Political control

Elections to the council are by thirds. This means that a third of the 56 councillors are elected every year over a four-year cycle (with no elections in the fourth year). Elections are usually held on the first Thursday in May.

Since the creation of the council in 1974, political control of the council has been held by the following parties:[3][4]

Year Overall Control
1974 - present Labour Party

References

  1. ^ "Proposal to establish a combined authority for Greater Merseyside" (PDF). Department for Communities and Local Government. November 2013. Retrieved 10 December 2013.
  2. ^ Clay, Oliver, Halton to become part of Liverpool city region, Runcorn & Widnes Weekly News, archived from the original on 27 July 2011, retrieved 15 January 2009
  3. ^ Coligan, Nick (2007-04-25). "It's one fight that Labour cannot lose ; Lib Dems' mission impossible: Local elections 2007". Liverpool Echo. p. 15.
  4. ^ "Halton". BBC News Online. 2008-04-19. Retrieved 2010-02-24.
1999 Halton Borough Council election

The 1999 Halton Borough Council election took place on 6 May 1999 to elect members of Halton Unitary Council in Cheshire, England. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour party stayed in overall control of the council. Overall turnout in the election was 22.2%.After the election, the composition of the council was

Labour 46

Liberal Democrat 8

Conservative 1

Vacant 1

2000 Halton Borough Council election

The 2000 Halton Borough Council election took place on 4 May 2000 to elect members of Halton Unitary Council in Cheshire, England. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.After the election, the composition of the council was

Labour 43

Liberal Democrat 7

Independent 4

Conservative 2

2001 Halton Borough Council election

The 2001 Halton Borough Council election took place on 7 June 2001 to elect members of Halton Unitary Council in Cheshire, England. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.After the election, the composition of the council was

Labour 45

Liberal Democrat 6

Independent 3

Conservative 1

2002 Halton Borough Council election

The 2002 Halton Borough Council election took place on 2 May 2002 to elect members of Halton Unitary Council in Cheshire, England. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.After the election, the composition of the council was

Labour 47

Liberal Democrat 7

Conservative 2

2004 Halton Borough Council election

The 2004 Halton Borough Council election took place on 10 June 2004 to elect members of Halton Unitary Council in Cheshire, England. The whole council was up for election with boundary changes since the last election in 2002. The Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.

2006 Halton Borough Council election

The 2006 Halton Borough Council election took place on 4 May 2006 to elect members of Halton Unitary Council in Cheshire, England. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.After the election, the composition of the council was

Labour 35

Liberal Democrat 13

Conservative 8

2007 Halton Borough Council election

The 2007 Halton Borough Council election took place on 3 May 2007 to elect members of Halton Unitary Council in Cheshire, England. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.After the election, the composition of the council was

Labour 33

Liberal Democrat 15

Conservative 8

2008 Halton Borough Council election

The 2008 Halton Borough Council election took place on 1 May 2008 to elect members of Halton Unitary Council in Cheshire, England. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.After the election, the composition of the council was

Labour 33

Liberal Democrat 14

Conservative 9

2011 Halton Borough Council election

The 2011 Halton Borough Council election took place on 10 May 2011 to elect members of Halton Unitary Council in Cheshire, England. One third of the council was up for election and the Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.

After the election, the composition of the council was

Labour 44

Liberal Democrat 6

Conservative 3

Independent 3

2012 Halton Borough Council election

The 2012 Halton Borough Council election was held on 3 May 2012 to elect members of Halton Borough Council in England.

2014 Halton Borough Council election

The 2014 Halton Borough Council election took place on 22 May 2014 to elect members of Halton Borough Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections.

2015 Halton Borough Council election

The 2015 Halton Borough Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect members of the Halton Borough Council in England. It was held on the same day as other local elections.

2016 Halton Borough Council election

The 2016 Halton Borough Council election took place on 5 May 2016 to elect members of Halton Borough Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections.

Borough of Halton

Halton is a local government district in the ceremonial county of Cheshire in North West England, with borough status and administered by a unitary authority. It was created in 1974 as a district of the non-metropolitan county of Cheshire, and became a unitary authority area on 1 April 1998 under Halton Borough Council. Since 2014 it has been a member of the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority. The borough consists of the towns of Runcorn and Widnes and the civil parishes of Hale, Daresbury, Moore, Preston Brook, Halebank and Sandymoor. The district borders Merseyside, Warrington and Cheshire West and Chester. The borough straddles the River Mersey – the area to the north (including Widnes) is historically part of Lancashire, that to the south (including Runcorn) part of Cheshire.

Halton Borough Council elections

Halton is a unitary authority in Cheshire, England. Until 1 April 1998 it was a non-metropolitan district.

Ormiston Bolingbroke Academy

Ormiston Bolingbroke Academy is a coeducational secondary school and sixth form with academy status in Runcorn, Cheshire.The school is named after Henry Bolingbroke, who became King Henry IV of England. The school is sponsored by the Ormiston Academies Trust and the University of Chester.Brookvale Comprehensive School merged with Norton Priory School and was renamed Halton High School. Halton was converted to academy status in September 2010 and was renamed Ormiston Bolingbroke Academy. Though it is no longer a community school directly administered by Halton Borough Council, Ormiston Bolingbroke Academy continues to coordinate with Halton Borough Council for admissions.In 2017, the school caused controversy when it banned a student, who had successfully battled cancer, from attending prom due to her lack of school attendance.

Runcorn

Runcorn is an industrial town and cargo port in Cheshire, England, on the southern bank of the River Mersey where the estuary narrows to form the Runcorn Gap. Its population in 2011 was 61,789. To the north across the River Mersey is Widnes. Warrington is upstream 8 miles (12.9 km) to the northeast and Liverpool downstream 16 miles (26 km) to the northwest.

Runcorn railway station is on a branch of the West Coast Main Line and provides frequent services to Liverpool Lime Street, Birmingham New Street and London Euston. Runcorn East connects Manchester Piccadilly, Warrington Bank Quay, Chester and North Wales. The A533 road passes through the town from the south and over the Mersey Gateway Bridge across the River Mersey and Manchester Ship Canal. The M56 motorway passes south of the town, through Preston Brook. Three bridges span the River Mersey and the Manchester Ship Canal at Runcorn: the Silver Jubilee Bridge, Mersey Gateway and Runcorn Railway Bridge. The Bridgewater Canal terminates in the town centre.

Runcorn was a small, isolated village until the Industrial Revolution. It was a health resort in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Towards the end of the 18th century, a port began to develop on the south bank of the River Mersey. In the 19th century, industries developed around the manufacture of soap and alkali, quarrying, shipbuilding, engineering, and tanning. New York Harbour and Liverpool Cathedral were built with Runcorn sandstone quarried from what is now Runcorn Hill Park. By the early 20th century, the prime industries were chemicals and tanning.

Chemical and high tech manufacturing continue and there has been diversification into services and particularly logistics because of Runcorn's easy access to the Manchester Ship Canal, railway and motorway networks. Runcorn was designated a new town in 1964 and expanded eastward in the 1960s and 1970s. Areas of housing have continued to expand farther to the east with the development of Sandymoor in the 1990s and 2000s. This rapid growth since the second half of the 20th century has resulted in the population more than doubling from around 26,000 to over 61,000 today. The town's motto is Navem Mercibus Implere (Latin for "fill the ship with goods"), a classical quotation from Juvenal.

Widnes

Widnes ( WID-nəss) is an industrial town in Halton, Cheshire, Northwest England. In 2011, it had a population of 61,464. Historically in Lancashire, it is on the northern bank of the River Mersey where the estuary narrows to form the Runcorn Gap. Directly to the south across the Mersey is the town of Runcorn. Upstream and 8 miles (13 km) to the east is the town of Warrington, and downstream to the west is Speke, part of the city of Liverpool.

Before the Industrial Revolution Widnes was made up of small settlements on marsh and moorland. In 1847 the chemist and industrialist John Hutchinson (1825–1865) established the first chemical factory at what would become Spike Island. Thereafter the town grew in population and rapidly became a major centre of the chemical industry. The demand for labour was met by large-scale immigration from Ireland, Poland, Lithuania and Wales. The town continues to be a major manufacturer of chemicals however many of the chemical factories have closed and the economy is predominantly based upon service industries.Widnes and Hough Green railway stations are on the Liverpool to Manchester line. The main roads through the town are the A557 in a north–south direction and the A562 east–west. The disused Sankey Canal terminates at Spike Island. The town has a number of landmarks, for many years the Silver Jubilee Bridge was the only bridge crossing the River Mersey that was West of Warrington. In 2017 the Mersey Gateway bridge opened to relieve congestion at the older bridge. The Catalyst Science Discovery Centre is the United Kingdom's only museum dedicated solely to the Chemical Industry and is located inside Hutchinson's former administrative building. The town's major sporting stadium hosts the Widnes Vikings Rugby League team.

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