Hall XP2H

The Hall XP2H-1 was an American prototype four-engined biplane flying boat of the 1930s. Intended as an experimental very-long-range maritime patrol aircraft, a single example was built. The XP2H-1 was the largest four engine biplane aircraft ever procured by the US Navy.[1]

XP2H-2
Hall XP2H-1 in Flight
Role Patrol flying boat
National origin United States of America
Manufacturer Hall-Aluminum Aircraft Corporation
First flight November 15, 1932
Primary user United States Navy
Number built 1

Development and design

In 1930, the United States Navy ordered a single example of a large flying boat from the Hall-Aluminum Aircraft Corporation, to meet a requirement for an experimental very-long-range patrol aircraft. The resulting design was designated XP2H-1 and was a four-engined biplane. It had an all-aluminum hull, a scaled-up version of that used in Hall's smaller PH flying boat, which accommodated a crew of six. The wings were of fabric-skinned aluminum construction and were of trapezoidal shape. The engines, Curtiss V-1570 Conquerors were mounted in tandem push-pull pairs between the wings.[2][3]

The XP2H-1 first flew on November 15, 1932, and was extensively tested, demonstrating excellent performance, being 11 mph (18 km/h) faster than predicted.[4] It was possible to cruise on just two engines to extend range, and in 1935, the XP2H-1 was used to carry out a nonstop flight between Norfolk, Virginia and Coco Solo, Panama Canal Zone. The XP2H-1 took 25 hours and 15 minutes to fly the 2,000 miles (3,200 km) distance between these two locations.[5] It was destroyed later in the year attempting a landing in open water.[6] No further P2Hs were built, with the US Navy equipping its patrol squadrons with smaller flying boats such as the Consolidated P2Y.

Operators

 United States

Specifications

Data from General Dynamic Aircraft and their Predecessors [4]

General characteristics

Performance

Armament

  • Guns: Five flexibly mounted 0.3 in Browning machine guns in nose, dorsal waist and tail positions
  • Bombs: 2,000 lb (909 kg) bombs

See also

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References

  1. ^ Test Pilot Airpower, September 1974 pp. 11-12
  2. ^ Wegg 1990, pp.113-114.
  3. ^ Flight January 24, 1935, p.94.
  4. ^ a b Wegg 1990, p.114.
  5. ^ Flight 21 February 1935, p.195.
  6. ^ Loftin 1985, Chapter 8: Boats in the Sky :Biplane Flying-Boat Developments, 1920-30.
  • "For Long Range Patrol". Flight, 24 January 1935. p. 94.
  • "A Long Distance Flight" Flight, 21 February 1935, p. 195.
  • Boyne, Walter J. "The Flying Hallmarks: The Hall Aluminium Classics". The Best of Wings Magazine. Washington, DC:Brasseys, 2001. ISBN 978-1-57488-368-8. pp. 52–61.
  • Loftin, Laurence K. Quest for Performance:The Evolution of Modern Aircraft,SP-468. Washington, DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, History Office, Scientific and Technical Information Branch, 1985.
  • Wegg, John. General Dynamic Aircraft and their Predecessors. London:Putnam, 1990. ISBN 0-85177-833-X.
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Hall PH

The Hall PH was an American flying boat of the 1930s. It was a twin-engined biplane, developed from the Naval Aircraft Factory PN and could hence trace its lineage back to the Felixstowe flying boats of World War I. The PH was purchased in small numbers by the United States Navy and the United States Coast Guard. It remained in service with the Coast Guard until 1944, being used for anti-submarine and search and rescue duties.

List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1925–1934)

This is a list of notable accidents and incidents involving military aircraft grouped by the year in which the accident or incident occurred. Not all of the aircraft were in operation at the time. For more exhaustive lists, see the Aircraft Crash Record Office or the Air Safety Network or the Dutch Scramble Website Brush and Dustpan Database. Combat losses are not included except for a very few cases denoted by singular circumstances.

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft before 1925

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1925–1934)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1935–1939)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1940–1944)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1945–1949)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1950–1954)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1955–1959)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1960–1974)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1975–1979)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1980–1989)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1990–1999)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (2000–2009)

See: List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (2010–present)

List of aircraft (H-He)

This is a list of aircraft in alphabetical order beginning with 'H'.

List of seaplanes and amphibious aircraft

The following is a list of seaplanes and amphibious aircraft, which includes floatplanes and flying boats, by country of origin.

Seaplanes are any aircraft that has the capability of landing on water while amphibious aircraft are equipped with wheels to alight on land, as well as being able to land on the water. Flying boats rely on the fuselage or hull for buoyancy, while floatplanes rely on external pontoons or floats. Some experimental aircraft used specially designed skis to skim across the water but did not always have a corresponding ability to float.

This list does not include ekranoplans, 'Wing-In-Ground-effect' (WIG), water-skimmers, wingships or similar vehicles reliant on ground effect.

Short Sarafand

The Short S.14 Sarafand was a British biplane flying boat built by Short Brothers. It was planned as a general reconnaissance aircraft for military service. When it was built in 1932 it was the largest aeroplane in the United Kingdom.

The Sarafand was first proposed by Oswald Short in 1928 as an enlarged development of the Singapore II, to provide transatlantic range capabilitity. Short managed to persuade first his chief designer Arthur Gouge and then the Chief of the Air Staff, Sir Hugh Trenchard (later Viscount Trenchard) of the feasibility of such a large aircraft and Air Ministry specification R.6/28 was drawn up to define the project. It was conducted as a public/private joint venture, the Air Ministry funding it with £60,000 and Short Brothers providing the rest. The aircraft was originally designated the Short R6/28 before being named the Sarafand.

Short Singapore

The Short Singapore was a British multi-engined biplane flying boat built after the First World War. The design was developed into two four-engined versions: the prototype Singapore II and production Singapore III. The latter became the Royal Air Force's main long-range maritime patrol flying boat of the 1930s and saw service against the Japanese with the Royal New Zealand Air Force during the Second World War.

William H. McAvoy

William H. "Bill" McAvoy was a civilian test pilot in the 1920s and 1930s for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, Langley Field, Virginia, and in 1940 helped start the flight operations division at the Ames Research Center, California.

Hall-Aluminum aircraft
USN/USMC patrol aircraft designations 1923–1962
Patrol
Patrol Bomber
Patrol Torpedo Bomber

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