Hal Van Every

Harold "Hal" Van Every (February 10, 1918 – August 11, 2007) was an American football back in the National Football League who played 21 games for the Green Bay Packers. In 1940, the Green Bay Packers used the 9th pick in the 1st round of the 1940 NFL Draft to sign Van Every out of the University of Minnesota. Van Every went on to play for two seasons with the Packers and retired in 1941.

Van Every then joined the United States Army for World War II, then transferred to the Air Corps after six months, becoming a bomber pilot.[1] He was assigned to 510th Squadron, 447th Bomb Group, Eighth Air Force, flying a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress heavy bomber out of Rattlesden Air Base in England.[1] On his ninth mission, his B-17 was shot down by flak on May 12, 1944. He was taken prisoner and sent to Stalag Luft III, arriving just after the famous "Great Escape".[1] Near the end of the war, with the Russians closing in, the Germans marched their prisoners away from the camp. Finally, on April 29, 1945, the POWs were liberated by George S. Patton's Third Army.[1]

Hal Van Every
No. 36
Position:Halfback/Defensive back
Personal information
Born:February 10, 1918
Minnetonka Beach, Minnesota
Died:August 11, 2007 (aged 89)
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Career information
High school:Wayzata (MN)
College:Minnesota
NFL Draft:1940 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Rushing attempts-yards:63–281
Receptions-yards:5–44
Touchdowns:3
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ a b c d Poling, Jerry (2006). After They Were Packers: The Super Bowl XXXI Champs & Other Green Bay Legends. Trails Books. pp. 242–244. ISBN 9781931599726. Retrieved December 18, 2017.

External links

1937 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1937 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1937 Big Ten Conference football season.

1939 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1939 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the 1939 Big Ten Conference football season.

1939 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1939 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1939 Big Ten Conference football season. In their eighth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 3–4–1 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 154 to 82.Tackle Win Pederson was named All-Big Ten first team. Halfback Hal Van Every was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 229,954, which averaged to 45,991. The season high for attendance was against Northwestern.

1940 Green Bay Packers season

The 1940 Green Bay Packers season was their 22nd season overall and their 20th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–4–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning them a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

1942 Second Air Force Bombers football team

The 1942 Second Air Force Bombers football team represented the Second Air Force during the 1944 college football season. The team, based at Fort George Wright in Spokane, Washington, compiled an 11–0–1 record and defeated the Hardin–Simmons Cowboys in the 1943 Sun Bowl.Despite its undefeated record, the Second Air Force team and all other service teams were omitted from the football rankings. Washington State, ranked No. 16 in the final AP Poll, played the Second Air Force team to a 6–6 tie.

Red Reese, who coached football and basketball at Eastern Washington College before the war, was the team's head coach. The team was led by a backfield that included former Washington State quarterback Bill Sewell, fullback Vic Spadaccini from Minnesota, Hal Van Every, a triple-threat halfback who played for the Green Bay Packers before the war, and Johnny Holmes from Washington State.

The linemen included ends Al Bodney and Bill Hornick, former Stanford center Tony Cavelli, Glen Conley of Washington and Don Williams of Texas at tackle, Tony Rosselli of Youngstown and Bill Holmes of Washington at guard.

Bobby Thomason

Robert Lee "Bobby" Thomason (March 26, 1928 – November 5, 2013) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Los Angeles Rams, Green Bay Packers, and the Philadelphia Eagles. He was selected to three Pro Bowls. Thomason played college football at Virginia Military Institute and was drafted in the first round of the 1949 NFL Draft.

Thomason married Jean Pierce in 1951. They had one daughter. Both survived him, as, in 2013, he died of heart failure at the age of 85.

David Whitehurst

Charles David Whitehurst (born April 27, 1955) is a former professional American football quarterback in the National Football League. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the 8th round of the 1977 NFL Draft. He played college football at Furman.

Don Milan

Don Milan is a former quarterback in the National Football League. He spent two seasons in the NFL. The first with the Los Angeles Rams, though he did not see any playing time during a regular season game. His second season was with the Green Bay Packers.

Jack Evans (American football)

John "Jack" Vinson Evans (August 5, 1905 - March 11, 1980) was a National Football League quarterback.

Jim Del Gaizo

Jim Del Gaizo (born May 31, 1947) is a former professional American football quarterback for the Miami Dolphins, Green Bay Packers, and New York Giants. His career in the National Football League lasted five seasons (1971–1975).

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Green Bay Packers starting quarterbacks

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. They are members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) and are the third-oldest franchise in the National Football League (NFL). The club was founded in 1919 by coach, player, and future Hall of Fame inductee Curly Lambeau and sports and telegraph editor George Whitney Calhoun. The Packers competed against local teams for two seasons before entering the NFL in 1921.

The Packers have had 46 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Packers' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees Curly Lambeau, Tony Canadeo, Arnie Herber, Bart Starr and Brett Favre. The team's first starting quarterback was Norm Barry, while the longest serving was Brett Favre. The Packers' starting quarterback for the 2018 season was Aaron Rodgers, who was playing in his 14th season in the NFL.

They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Packers.

Norman Barry

Norman Christopher Barry (December 25, 1897 – October 13, 1988) was an American judge, politician, and football coach.

Paul Fitzgibbon

Joseph Paul Fitzgibbon (March 21, 1903 - March 12, 1975) was a professional American football player who played wide receiver for six seasons for the Duluth Eskimos, Frankford Yellow Jackets, Chicago Cardinals, and Green Bay Packers. Following his football career Paul Fitzgibbon became a neurologist and later one of the seven founding members of the Permanente Medical Group, now Kaiser Permanente.

Randy Wright

Randall Steven Wright (born January 12, 1961) is a former professional American football quarterback and color commentator who played for the Green Bay Packers from 1984 to 1988 and covered Big Ten football for ESPN for 12 years.

Roger Grove

Roger Robert Grove (June 19, 1908 – December 19, 1986) was a professional American football running back in the National Football League. He played five seasons for the Green Bay Packers including the 1931 team that won the NFL Championship. He lettered at Michigan State in 1928, 1929 and 1930.

Roy McKay (American football)

Roy Dale McKay (February 2, 1920 – May 29, 1969) was a player in the National Football League.

Stan Heath (gridiron football)

Stanley Robert Heath (March 5, 1927 – September 26, 2010) was a quarterback in the National Football League who played 12 games for the Green Bay Packers. In 1949, the Green Bay Packers used the 5th pick in the 1st round of the 1949 NFL Draft to sign Heath out of the University of Nevada, Reno, where he was the nation's top passer. Previously, he had been a member of the Wisconsin Badgers. Heath was the first NCAA quarterback to throw for over 2,000 yards in a season, a mark that would not be surpassed for fifteen years. He finished 5th in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1948. Heath only played one season with the Packers before moving to the Canadian Football League.

Heath is the son of former major league baseball player Mickey Heath, the uncle of attorney and TruTV television commentator Robert W. Bigelow, and cousin to broadcaster and author Jim Heath.

Heath died at his home in Jesup, Georgia.

Van Every

Van Every is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Dale Van Every (1896–1976), American writer and film producer

Hal Van Every (1918–2007), American footballer

Jonathan Van Every (born 1979), American baseball player

Kermit Van Every (1915–1998), American aerospace engineer

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