Hal Lanier

Harold Clifton Lanier (born July 4, 1942) is a former infielder, coach and manager in Major League Baseball. From November 2014 through the end of his 2018 contract, Lanier, served as the first manager of the Ottawa Champions of the independent Can-Am League. From 1964 through 1973, Lanier played for the San Francisco Giants (1964–71) and New York Yankees (1972–73). He is the son of Max Lanier, a former MLB All-Star pitcher.

Hal Lanier
Infielder / Manager
Born: July 4, 1942 (age 76)
Denton, North Carolina
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 18, 1964, for the San Francisco Giants
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1973, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Batting average.228
Home runs8
Runs batted in273
Managerial record254–232
Winning %.523
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Playing career

In his rookie season Lanier posted a career-high .274 batting average for the San Francisco Giants and was selected for the 1964 Topps All-Star Rookie team.

In 1968, Lanier led NL shortstops in putouts (282) and fielding average (.979). After that, he moved from second base to shortstop, and finally to third base. He also played in part of two seasons with the New York Yankees.

In a 10-season career, Lanier was a .228 hitter with eight home runs and 273 RBI in 1196 games played. In each of the three seasons from 1967 to 1969 he ranked last among NL qualifiers in average, on-base percentage, and slugging percentage.

Managerial career

Following his playing career, Lanier managed in the minors and served as third base coach for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1981–85, including the 1982 World Series and 1985 National League champion teams. He then went on to manage the Houston Astros from 1986–88 and had a 254-232 win-loss record. In 1986, he was named NL Manager of the Year by the BBWA and TSN for leading the Astros to their first Division Title since 1980 and the best record (96-66) in team history up to that point. A power struggle between Lanier and Astros' general manager Dick Wagner in 1987 eventually lead to Wagner leaving the team.

In 1988, the Astros lost a home game to the San Francisco Giants. As the team prepared to eat the post-game meal, take showers, and go home, they received word they were wanted back on the field. Lanier brought out the batting cage and ordered the team to take batting practice again. Lanier was fired at the end of the season.

In recent years, Lanier has managed in the independent minor leagues. He managed for the Winnipeg Goldeyes in the Northern League for several years, then moved to the Can-Am League to manage the Sussex Skyhawks. While with the Skyhawks, Lanier led the team to the league championship in 2008 over the Quebec Capitales in the Can-Am League Championship Series. He left the Skyhawks following the 2009 season to become manager of the Normal CornBelters.

On December 12, 2012, the Yuma Desert Rats of the independent American West Baseball League, announced they had come to terms with Lanier to manage the Desert Rats for the 2013 season, however the team folded before playing a game. On November 18, 2014, the Ottawa Champions of the Can-Am League announced that Lanier would be their manager for the 2015 season.[1] On September 17, 2016, his team beat the Rockland Boulders 3-1 to win 2016 league championship three games to two.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Ottawa Champions name Hal Lanier as first manager | CBC News". CBC. CBC News. 18 November 2014. Retrieved 19 November 2018.

External links

1964 San Francisco Giants season

The 1964 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 82nd year in Major League Baseball, their seventh year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their fifth at Candlestick Park. The team finished in fourth place, as a result of their 90–72 record, placing them three games behind the National League and World Series Champion St. Louis Cardinals.

1965 San Francisco Giants season

The 1965 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 83rd year in Major League Baseball, their eighth year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their sixth at Candlestick Park. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 95–67 record, 2 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1966 San Francisco Giants season

The 1966 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 84th year in Major League Baseball, their ninth year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their seventh at Candlestick Park. The Giants finished second in the National League with a record of 93 wins and 68 losses, a game-and-a-half behind their arch-rivals, the NL champion Los Angeles Dodgers.

1967 San Francisco Giants season

The 1967 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 85th year in Major League Baseball, their tenth year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their eighth at Candlestick Park. The team finished in second place in the National League with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses, 10½ games behind the NL and World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals.

1968 San Francisco Giants season

The 1968 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 86th year in Major League Baseball, their eleventh year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their ninth at Candlestick Park. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 88–74 record, 9 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1969 San Francisco Giants season

The 1969 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 87th year in Major League Baseball, their twelfth year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their tenth at Candlestick Park. The team finished second in the newly established National League West with a record of 90–72, 3 games behind the Atlanta Braves, their fifth consecutive season of finishing second. The Giants set a Major League record which still stands for the most double plays grounded into by a team in a single game, with 7 against the Houston Astros on May 4.

1970 San Francisco Giants season

The 1970 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 88th year in Major League Baseball, their 13th year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 11th at Candlestick Park. The Giants went 86–76, which was good for third place in the National League West, 16 games behind the NL Champion Cincinnati Reds.

1972 New York Yankees season

The 1972 New York Yankees season was the 70th season for the Yankees in New York, and the 72nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 79–76, finishing 6½ games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1972 San Francisco Giants season

The 1972 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 90th year in Major League Baseball, their 15th year in San Francisco, and their 13th at Candlestick Park. The Giants finished in fifth place in the National League West with a record of 69–86. It was their first losing season in San Francisco and the franchise's first losing season since 1957, which was the franchise's final year in New York.

1974 New York Yankees season

The 1974 New York Yankees season was the 72nd season for the team in New York and its 74th overall dating from its origins in Baltimore. The team finished with a record of 89–73, finishing 2 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Bill Virdon. The Yankees played at Shea Stadium due to the ongoing renovation of Yankee Stadium.

1986 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1986 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Houston Astros attempting to win the National League West, which they did for their third time in seven seasons.

1986 Major League Baseball season

The 1986 Major League Baseball season saw the New York Mets win their second World Series title, their first since 1969.

1986 National League Championship Series

The 1986 National League Championship Series was a best-of-the seven Major League Baseball postseason series between the NL East champion New York Mets and NL West champion Houston Astros. It is the lone MLB playoff series in which the opponents were two "expansion" teams that had begun play in the same season (1962) and was won by the Mets, four games to two, culminating with their 7–6, 16-inning triumph at Houston in Game 6. New York then defeated the Boston Red Sox in the 1986 World Series, four games to three.

1987 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1987 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Houston Astros attempting to win the National League West.

1988 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1988 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Houston Astros attempting to win the National League West.

American West Baseball League

The American West Baseball League was a proposed independent baseball league formed in 2012 and was to start playing in 2013. Sean Smock, a former general manager in minor league baseball, was to be the commissioner of the league.

Numerous teams joined or were set to join within the first few months of the league's creation. The Yuma Desert Rats, who were to be managed by Hal Lanier but withdrew from the league in January 2013, were one. Others included the Orange County Flyers, Long Beach Splash, Fullerton Flyers (to be managed by Evert Renteria), North County Cannons and a squad from Mesa, Arizona, which was to be co-owned by former major league baseball pitcher Albie Lopez. After the Desert Rats withdrew, the league had only Fullerton, San Diego, Orange County and North County among its ranks. Later in January, the circuit added a team in Las Cruces, New Mexico, which was to be managed by Kelly Stinnett and called the Las Cruces Sun Rays. In late February, Nogales, Arizona joined with a team, to be called the Nogales Desert Ghosts and managed by Jolbert Cabrera. In March, North County dropped out of the league. The Bisbee Copperheads (to be managed by Danny DiPace) joined in May, but later that month it stated it would postpone its start to 2014. The league never resurfaced. One source says there was an attempt to put a team in Douglas, Arizona, as well.

Édgar Rentería and Edinson Renteria were investors.

There was also going to be a AWBL winter league, but it, too, was canceled.

Chuck Hiller

Charles Joseph Hiller (October 1, 1934 – October 20, 2004) was an American professional baseball player, coach and manager. Hiller, a second baseman, appeared in 704 games over eight seasons (1961–68) in Major League Baseball as a member of the San Francisco Giants, New York Mets, Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates. He became the first National League player in history to hit a grand slam home run in World Series play. The homer came at Yankee Stadium during the seventh inning of Game 4 of the 1962 World Series against left-handed relief pitcher Marshall Bridges on October 8. It broke a 2–2 deadlock and provided the winning margin in San Francisco's eventual 7–3 victory.Born in Johnsburg, Illinois, Hiller batted left-handed, threw right-handed, and was listed as 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and 170 pounds (77 kg). After he attended the University of St. Thomas (Minnesota), he was signed by the Cleveland Indians in 1957. He spent two seasons in the lower echelons of Cleveland's farm system before the Giants selected him in the minor league baseball draft.

After a 70-game trial with the 1961 Giants, Hiller made the 1962 edition and became the Giants' regular second baseman. He set a career high in games played (161), runs scored (94), hits (166), doubles (22) and runs batted in (48). He went three-for-10 and played errorless ball in the field during the tie-breaker series with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Then, during the World Series, ultimately won by the New York Yankees, he batted .269 overall (7-for-26) and turned seven double plays during the Series' seven games.

Hiller's batting average plummeted from 1962's .276 to .223 in 1963 and the following season he was supplanted by Hal Lanier as the Giants' regular second baseman. For the remainder of his active MLB career, he was a utility infielder. He hit .243 with 516 hits and 20 home runs in his 704 games the Majors.

When he retired after the 1968 season, he became a minor league manager in the Pirates' organization for a year, then returned to the Mets in a similar capacity, working for the Mets' director of player development, Whitey Herzog, through 1972. He then served under manager Herzog as an MLB coach with the Texas Rangers, Kansas City Royals and St. Louis Cardinals, and later spent brief terms in the post with the Giants and the Mets. In between his big-league assignments, Hiller served the Mets as a longtime infield instructor in their minor league system, and managed in the Cardinals' organization.

He died from leukemia at age 70 in St. Petersburg Beach, Florida.

Ottawa Champions

The Ottawa Champions Baseball Club (French: Les Champions d'Ottawa) is a professional baseball team based in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The Champions made their debut as a member of the Canadian American Association of Professional Baseball (Can-Am League) in 2015.

They won their first league championship in 2016 defeating the Rockland Boulders 3-2 after being down 2-0 in the series, winning game 5, 3-1 with a complete game win by Austin Chrismon.

They play their home games at Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton Park. The Champions mascot is Champ.

Springfield Giants

From 1957 through 1965, the Springfield Giants were the Single-A and Double-A baseball team affiliate of the New York/San Francisco Giants in the Eastern League. The team played at Pynchon Park in Springfield, Massachusetts.

The Springfield Giants won three consecutive championships in 1959, 1960 (co-champs) and 1961 under manager Andy Gilbert, all leading the way to San Francisco's National League pennant in 1962.

Some Springfield Giants players with Major League experience include:

Juan Marichal

Felipe Alou

Matty Alou

Tom Haller

Manny Mota

Bill Hands

Jim Ray Hart

Hal Lanier

Frank Linzy

José Pagán

Bob Barton

Al Stanek

Ernie Bowman

Rick Joseph

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.