Hal Gregg

Harold Dana Gregg (July 11, 1921 – May 13, 1991) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers (1943–47), Pittsburgh Pirates (1948–50) and New York Giants (1952). Gregg batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Anaheim, California.

In a nine-season career, Gregg posted a 40–48 record with 401 strikeouts and a 4.54 ERA in 827 innings pitched.

In 1947 Gregg became an unlikely World Series figure. He had pitched very well in relief for Brooklyn, especially in the 4th game when Bill Bevens was hurling his 8​23 innings of no-hit ball only to lose in the 9th. Gregg relieved the starter in the 1st, got out of the jam with no runs, and pitched 7 innings holding the Yankees to 2 runs, working out of some more tough jams and keeping Brooklyn in the game. Since Brooklyn's manager had completely mishandled the pitching staff, continually using starters in relief, there was only Gregg ready to start game 7; Gregg thus joined some of the few but greatest pitchers in history who have started a World Series 7th game. Gregg, on two days' rest, lost, giving up 3 runs in 4 innings. He threw 12 innings in the series with 10 strikeouts including DiMaggio, who seldom struck out.

He was a better than average hitting pitcher in his career, compiling a .205 batting average (54-for-263) with 26 runs, 2 home runs and 15 RBI.

Gregg died in Bishop, California, at age of 69.

Hal Gregg
Pitcher
Born: July 11, 1921
Anaheim, California
Died: May 13, 1991 (aged 69)
Bishop, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 18, 1943, for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
August 17, 1952, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Win–loss record40–48
Earned run average4.54
Strikeouts401
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Best season

Highlights

  • Was the winning pitcher against the Boston Braves, 5–3, during the historic debut of Jackie Robinson with the Brooklyn Dodgers (April 15, 1947)
  • Pitched a one-hit, 1–0 shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies at Ebbets Field (April 22, 1947)
  • The 1947 World Series. He led all Brooklyn pitchers in innings pitched and strikeouts with a memorable 4th game: 7IP, 4H 1R.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Ed Head
Brooklyn Dodgers Opening Day
Starting pitcher

1944
Succeeded by
Curt Davis
Preceded by
Curt Davis
Brooklyn Dodgers Opening Day
Starting pitcher

1946
Succeeded by
Joe Hatten
1943 Brooklyn Dodgers season

With the roster depleted by players leaving for service in World War II, the 1943 Brooklyn Dodgers finished the season in third place.

The team featured five future Hall of Famers: second baseman Billy Herman, shortstop Arky Vaughan, outfielders Paul Waner, and Joe Medwick, and manager Leo Durocher.

Herman finished fourth in MVP voting, after hitting .330 with 100 runs batted in. Vaughan led the league in runs scored and stolen bases.

1944 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1944 Brooklyn Dodgers saw constant roster turnover as players left for service in World War II. The team finished the season in seventh place in the National League.

1945 Brooklyn Dodgers season

As World War II was drawing to a close, the 1945 Brooklyn Dodgers finished 11 games back in third place in the National League race.

1945 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1945 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was cancelled on April 24 after the Major League Baseball (MLB) season began on April 17. The July 10 game was cancelled due to wartime travel restrictions in World War II. 1945 is the only year since 1933 when the first official All-Star Game was played, that an All-Star Game was cancelled and All-Stars were not officially selected.

This was to have been the 13th annual playing of the "Midsummer Classic" by MLB's American League (AL) and National League (NL) All-Star teams. The game was to be played at Fenway Park, home of the AL's Boston Red Sox. Fenway Park was chosen for the 1946 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (13th "Midsummer Classic") which was played on July 9 of that year.

On July 9 and 10, 1945, seven out of eight scheduled interleague night games were advertised and played as "All-Star" games in place of the official All-Star Game during the three-day All-Star break to help support the American Red Cross and the National War Fund. Four of the exhibition games were played on July 10 in Washington, D.C., St. Louis, Philadelphia, and Boston.

Germany had surrendered in May 1945. Mike Todd, a Broadway producer, had passed on the idea of holding the 1945 All-Star Game in Nuremberg, Germany, at a stadium renamed "Soldier Field" where U.S. Troops stationed in the European Theater played baseball. Although baseball's new commissioner, Happy Chandler was reportedly "intrigued" by the idea, it was ultimately dismissed as impractical by military advisors.

1946 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1946 Brooklyn Dodgers finished the season tied for first place with the St. Louis Cardinals. The two teams played in the first ever playoff series to decide the pennant, and the Cardinals took two straight to win the title.

With their star players back from the war, Brooklyn had jumped back into serious contention. They would be respectable until their move to Los Angeles 10 years later.

This season was the team's – and Major League Baseball's – last non-integrated one.

1947 Brooklyn Dodgers season

On April 15, Jackie Robinson was the opening day first baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers, becoming the first black player in Major League Baseball. Robinson went on to bat .297, score 125 runs, steal 29 bases and be named the very first African-American Rookie of the Year. The Dodgers won the National League title and went on to lose to the New York Yankees in the 1947 World Series. This season was dramatized in the movie 42.

1947 World Series

The 1947 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Yankees won the Series in seven games for their first title since 1943, and their eleventh World Series championship in team history. Yankees manager Bucky Harris won the Series for the first time since managing the Washington Senators to their only title in 1924.

In 1947, Jackie Robinson, a Brooklyn Dodger, desegregated major league baseball. For the first time in World Series history, a racially integrated team played.

1948 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1948 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 67th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; the 62nd in the National League. The Pirates finished fourth in the league standings with a record of 83–71.

1952 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1952 New York Giants season was the franchise's 70th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 92-62 record, 4½ games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Billy Cox (baseball)

William Richard Cox (August 29, 1919 – March 30, 1978) was an American professional baseball third baseman and shortstop. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Brooklyn Dodgers, and Baltimore Orioles.

He played for the Newport Buffaloes high school team. Signed as an amateur free agent by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1940, Cox made his MLB debut with the Pirates on September 20, 1941, playing in ten games at shortstop that season before serving in the military during World War II.

After returning to the Pirates, he was the starting shortstop in 1946 and 1947 before being traded to the Brooklyn Dodgers on December 8, 1947, along with Preacher Roe and Gene Mauch, for Dixie Walker, Hal Gregg and Vic Lombardi.Cox was the third baseman of a Dodgers infield in the 1950s that included Gil Hodges, Jackie Robinson and Pee Wee Reese.

In the 1953 World Series, Cox had a two-run double in Game 2 and a three-run homer in Game 5 against the New York Yankees. He batted .304 for the Series and led Brooklyn in runs batted in with six.

Cox was an infield starter (principally at third base) and leadoff hitter for the Baltimore Orioles for the first half of 1955, but after being pulled for a pinch runner on June 11, was traded at the trading deadline, June 16. Cox, however, would not report to his new team, the Cleveland Indians, reigning American League champions. Even after a meeting with Indians' manager Al López, Cox resolved to retire and did so on June 17. After Cox retired, the Orioles did not settle on a starting third baseman until Brooks Robinson won the job in 1957. The Orioles used 13 third basemen in 1955.

The youth baseball park on North Second Street in Newport, Pennsylvania, is named after Cox, and hosts River League games (independent Little League) as well as an annual Pete Howell Memorial tournament during the second week of July. Howell was the local district justice and long-time president of the Newport Baseball Association.

Curt Davis

"Curt Davis" was also a pseudonym used by Jack Kirby.

Curtis Benton Davis (September 7, 1903 – October 12, 1965) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. On October 2, 1933 he was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies from the Pacific Coast League San Francisco Seals in the 1933 rule V draft. He played for the Phillies (1934–36), Chicago Cubs (1935–37), St. Louis Cardinals (1938–40), and Brooklyn Dodgers (1940–46). The right-hander was a native of Greenfield, Missouri.

Even though Davis did not pitch in the major leagues until he was 30, he still managed to have a 13-season National League career. He had quite a list of accomplishments, including winning 19 games as a rookie, 22 wins in 1939, eleven double-digit victory seasons, twice a NL All-Star, and pitching in the 1941 World Series. He had excellent control, leading the league in BB/9IP in 1938 and 1941, and finishing in the top ten in that category ten times.

Other top ten rankings for Davis include wins (4 times), winning percentage (4 times), ERA (4 times), H/9IP (3 times), WHIP (5 times), shutouts (5 times), saves (5 times), games finished (1 time), and oldest player (5 times).

Career totals for 429 games pitched include a 158–131 record, 281 games started, 141 complete games, 24 shutouts, 111 games finished, 33 saves, and an ERA of 3.42 in 2325 innings pitched.

Davis had a .203 career batting average (165-813) with 11 home runs and 81 RBI. He hit .300 (12-40) with the Cubs in 1937 and .381 (40-105) with 17 RBI with the Cardinals in 1939.

After pitching one game in the 1946 season (April 28), he was released by Brooklyn three days later.

Davis died at the age of 62 in Covina, California.

Harry Taylor (1946–52 pitcher)

James Harry Taylor (May 20, 1919 – November 5, 2000) was an American professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher who appeared in 90 games, 44 as a starter, in Major League Baseball for the Brooklyn Dodgers (1946–48) and Boston Red Sox (1950–52). The native of East Glenn, Indiana, stood 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighed 175 pounds (79 kg).

Taylor's professional career lasted from 1938 through 1955, with five seasons (1941–45) missed due to United States Army service in World War II and another two (1953–54) out of organized baseball in the semipro ranks. He spent the entire 1947 campaign on the Dodgers' big-league roster, winning ten of 15 decisions with 20 starting assignments and two shutouts. It was an eventful season for Brooklyn that saw Jackie Robinson break the baseball color line in the Major Leagues, manager Leo Durocher's season-long suspension for "conduct detrimental to baseball", and the Dodgers win their seventh overall National League pennant.

Taylor was the Dodgers' starting pitcher in Game 4 of the 1947 World Series on October 3 at Ebbets Field. Matched against the New York Yankees' Bill Bevens, Taylor failed to record an out, facing four batters in the first inning and allowing two singles, a base on balls, a fielder's choice (the batter reaching on an error) and an unearned run before being relieved by Hal Gregg, who got out of the inning without further scoring. Bevens, meanwhile, threw 8​2⁄3 innings of no-hit baseball. But the Yankee hurler allowed ten bases on balls, and his no-hitter and game were ruined by pinch hitter Cookie Lavagetto's double, the Dodgers winning what some call "The Cookie Game", 3–2.

Taylor returned to the minor leagues during the 1948 season, and spent almost all of the following two years at Triple-A. But in September 1950, his contract was purchased by the Red Sox, who were chasing the Yankees and Detroit Tigers in the American League pennant race. After one game in relief, he threw two complete game victories, September 25 against the Philadelphia Athletics (a two-hit shutout) and October 1 against the Yankees. But Boston fell short in the standings, finishing in third place, four games behind the Yankees.

In his 90 MLB games, Taylor worked 357​2⁄3 innings pitched, and allowed 344 hits and 201 bases on balls. He recorded 127 strikeouts, 16 complete games and four saves.

He posted a .161 batting average (20-for-124) in his career. He fielded his position well, recording a .990 fielding percentage with only one error in 105 total chances.

List of Brooklyn Dodgers Opening Day starting pitchers

From their inception in 1884 through their last year in Brooklyn, 1957, the Brooklyn Dodgers (also known as the Trolley Dodgers, Grooms, Bridegrooms, Superbas, and Robins at various times in their history) used 41 different starting pitchers on Opening Day. Brickyard Kennedy made the most Opening Day starts for the Brooklyn Dodgers, with 6 such starts between 1894 and 1900. Nap Rucker made 5 such starts between 1907 and 1913. Carl Erskine made 4 Opening Day starts between 1951 and 1955 and Van Mungo also made 4 Opening Day starts between 1934 and 1938. Five Brooklyn pitchers made 3 Opening Day starts: Leon Cadore, Watty Clark, Don Newcombe, Jesse Petty, Dutch Ruether. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day.The Dodgers played in the modern World Series nine times before moving to Los Angeles, winning once in 1955, when Carl Esrkine was the Opening Day pitcher. Erskine was also the Opening Day pitcher in 1953 when they played in the World Series but lost to the New York Yankees. Joe Hatten also had two Opening Day starts in World Series years, 1947 and 1949. Other Opening Day starting pitchers in World Series years were Larry Cheney in 1916, Leon Cadore in 1920, Whit Wyatt in 1941, Preacher Roe in 1952, and Don Newcombe in 1956.

Prior to the existence of the modern World Series, the Dodgers won National League championships in 1890, 1899 and 1900. They also won an American Association championship in 1889, when the American Association was considered a Major League. They played in the 19th century version of the World Series in 1889 and 1890. Mickey Hughes was the Opening Day starting pitcher in 1889, Bob Caruthers was the Opening Day starting pitcher in 1890, and Kennedy was the Opening Day starting pitcher in 1899 and 1900.

Don Newcombe was the starting pitcher in 1956, the last Opening Day that the Dodgers played in their longtime home field, Ebbets Field. Newcombe was also the Opening Day starter on Opening Day of the 1957 season, the Dodgers last Opening Day before moving to Los Angeles. Nap Rucker was the Opening Day starting pitcher in the last Opening Day the team (then called the Trolley Dodgers) played at their previous home park, Washington Park, in 1912. Rucker was also the Opening Day pitcher in the first game at Ebbets Field in 1913.

Joe Hatten was the Opening Day starting pitcher in one of the most momentous games in baseball history. That was in 1947, the years of Jackie Robinson's first game in the Major Leagues, ending the racial segregation that had prevailed in Major League Baseball since before 1900. The Joe Hatten started and the Dodgers won Jackie Robinson's first major league game, beating the Boston Braves 5-3 at Ebbets Field.

List of Los Angeles Dodgers seasons

The Los Angeles Dodgers are the second most successful franchise in the National League and the third-most successful and second-most wealthy in Major League Baseball after the New York Yankees. The franchise was formerly based in Brooklyn and known originally as the "Grays" or "Trolley Dodgers" after the trams which supporters had to avoid to enter games. Later it became known successively as the "Bridegrooms", "Superbas", "Dodgers" and "Robins"; the present "Dodgers" was firmly established in 1932.

The franchise has won the World Series six times and lost a further 13, and like the Yankees and Cardinals have never lost 100 games in a season since World War I, with their worst record since then being in 1992 with 63 wins and their best records ever being in 1953 with 105 wins and both 1942 and 2017 with 104. Their most successful period, between 1947 and 1966 with ten World Series appearances and only two seasons with 71 or more losses (one of them the year they moved to Los Angeles after a dispute over stadium funding), was famous for the Dodgers becoming the first Major League Baseball team to incorporate African American players, led by Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella.

Low Country Blues

Low Country Blues is the seventh studio album by Gregg Allman, and the next to last studio album he released during his lifetime. It was produced by T Bone Burnett, and was released through Rounder Records on January 18, 2011. The album reached No. 5 on the Billboard 200 and No. 1 on the Top Blues Albums charts. It was nominated for a 2011 Grammy Award for Best Blues Album.

Max Surkont

Matthew Constantine Surkont (June 16, 1922 – October 8, 1986) was an American professional baseball pitcher who played from 1949 through 1957 in the Major Leagues. He played for the Chicago White Sox, Boston Braves, Milwaukee Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, and New York Giants. The nickname Max was given to him by his childhood friends.

Preacher Roe

Elwin Charles Roe (February 26, 1916 – November 9, 2008), known as Preacher Roe, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals (1938), Pittsburgh Pirates (1944–47), and Brooklyn Dodgers (1948–54).

Washington Red Birds

The Washington Red Birds was the predominant name of a minor league baseball team located in Washington, Pennsylvania between 1934 and 1942. The Red Birds played in the Pennsylvania State Association. Known as the Washington Generals in 1934 and 1935, the team was affiliated with the New York Yankees. After a four-year hiatus, the Red Birds represented Washington in the league, as an affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals. The team and the league both disbanded in 1942, due to the strains of World War II.

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