Hal Clement

Harry Clement Stubbs (May 30, 1922 – October 29, 2003), better known by the pen name Hal Clement, was an American science fiction writer and a leader of the hard science fiction subgenre. He also painted astronomically oriented artworks under the name George Richard.[2]

In 1998 Clement was inducted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame[3][a] and named the 17th SFWA Grand Master by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (presented in 1999).[4][5]

Hal Clement
14th WSFS 008 - John Campbell and Hal Clement (cropped)
BornHarry Clement Stubbs
May 30, 1922[1]
Somerville, Massachusetts
DiedOctober 29, 2003 (aged 81)
Milton, Massachusetts, US
Pen nameGeorge Richard (as artist)
OccupationNovelist, military pilot, science teacher
NationalityAmerican
Period1942–2003
GenreScience fiction
Literary movementHard science fiction
Notable works

Biography

Harry Clement Stubbs was born in Somerville, Massachusetts on May 30, 1922.

He went to Harvard, graduating with a B.S. in astronomy in 1943. While there he wrote his first published story, "Proof", which appeared in the June 1942 issue of Astounding Science Fiction, edited by John W. Campbell; three more appeared in later 1942 numbers.[6] His further educational background includes an M.Ed. (Boston University 1946) and M.S. in chemistry (Simmons College 1963).

During World War II Clement was a pilot and copilot of a B-24 Liberator and flew 35 combat missions over Europe with the 68th Bomb Squadron, 44th Bomb Group, based in England with 8th Air Force. After the war, he served in the United States Air Force Reserve, and retired with the rank of colonel. He taught chemistry and astronomy for many years at Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts.

From 1949 to 1953, Clement's first three novels were two-, three-, and four-part Astounding serials under Campbell: Needle (Doubleday, 1950), Iceworld (Gnome Press, 1953), and Mission of Gravity (1954), his best-known novel, published by Doubleday's Science Fiction Book Club (established 1953). The latter novel features a land and sea expedition across the superjovian planet Mesklin to recover a stranded scientific probe. The natives of Mesklin are centipede-like intelligent beings about 50 centimeters long. Various episodes hinge on the fact that Mesklin's fast rotational speed causes it to be considerably deformed from the spherical, with effective surface gravity that varies from approximately 3 gn at the equator to approximately 700 gn at the poles.

Clement's article "Whirligig World" describes his approach to writing a science fiction story:

Writing a science fiction story is fun, not work. ...the fun...lies in treating the whole thing as a game.... [T]he rules must be quite simple. They are; for the reader of a science-fiction story, they consist of finding as many as possible of the author's statements or implications which conflict with the facts as science currently understands them. For the author, the rule is to make as few such slips as he possibly can... Certain exceptions are made [e.g., to allow travel faster than the speed of light], but fair play demands that all such matters be mentioned as early as possible in the story...

Clement was a frequent guest at science fiction conventions, especially in the eastern United States, where he usually presented talks and slide shows about writing and astronomy.

Clement died in Massachusetts at the Milton Hospital on October 29, 2003 at age 81. He died in his sleep, most likely due to complications of diabetes.

Awards and honors

Clement has been honored several times for his cumulative contributions including 1998 Hall of Fame induction, when Clement and Frederik Pohl were the fifth and sixth living persons[a] honored, and the 1999 SFWA Grand Master Award.[3][4][5]

For the 1945 short story "Uncommon Sense" he received a 50-year Retro Hugo Award at the 1996 World Science Fiction Convention. Mission of Gravity, first published as a serial during 1953, was named best foreign novel by the Spanish Science Fiction Association in 1994 and it was a finalist for a 50-year Retro Hugo Award in 2004.[5]

The Hal Clement Award for Young Adults for Excellence in Children's Science Fiction Literature is presented in his memory at Worldcon each year.[7]

Wayne Barlowe illustrated two of Clement's fictional species, the Abyormenites and the Mesklinites, in his Barlowe's Guide to Extraterrestrials.

Planets

Planets created by Clement typically feature unique astronomical or physical aspects. They include:

  • Abyormen – A planet circling a dwarf star (Theer), which in turn circles a blue giant. This produces a hot and a cold season, each of 65 years' duration. The native intelligent life forms undergo a seasonal mass death. From Cycle of Fire.
  • Dhrawn – A high-gravity world settled by Mesklinites in Star Light.
  • Habranha - A planet that is tidally locked with its sun, such that the dark side is a mix of solid CO2, solid methane, and ice, and the sunlit side completely ocean, in Fossil.
  • Hekla – An ice-age planet in "Cold Front" (a short story in Astounding July 1946).
  • Kaihapa – An uninhabited ocean planet, twin of Kainui, in Noise.
  • Kainui – An inhabited ocean planet in Noise.
  • Mesklin — A planet with ultra-high gravity (up to 700 g) in Mission of Gravity. Clement later corrected his model of Mesklin and determined that the maximum surface gravity would be "only 250 gravities".
  • Sarr – An extremely hot planet with an atmosphere of gaseous sulfur, and little liquid (the natives occasionally need to drink a bit of molten copper chloride), in Iceworld
  • Tenebra – A high-gravity world with a highly corrosive atmosphere consisting mostly of water vapor near its critical point, in Close to Critical.
  • Enigma 88 - A small planet near η Carinae in Still River. The interior of the object is honeycombed with caves, due to evaporation of accreted ice-rich planetoids. Unusually for Clement, Enigma's structure is not fully consistent with the laws of physics.

Short stories, novelettes and novellas

Satellite science fiction 195702
Editor Sam Merwin Jr. added 10,000 words to Clement's novella "Planetfall" for its publication in the February 1957 issue of Satellite Science Fiction as "Planet for Plunder"
Galaxy 196308
Clement's short story "Hot Planet" took the cover of the August 1963 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction.
  • "Proof" (June 1942). Short story. Published in Astounding. Collected in The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2, Possible Worlds of Science Fiction (1951), SF: Author's Choice 2 (1970), Where Do We Go From Here? (1971), The Great SF Stories 4 (1942) (1980), First Voyages (1981), The Golden Years of Science Fiction (Second Series) (1983), Encounters (1988), Ascent of Wonder (1994) and Wondrous Beginnings (2003).
  • Impediment (aug 1942). Novelette. Published in Astounding. Collected in Natives of Space, The Best of Hal Clement and The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2.
  • Avenue of Escape (nov 1942). Published in Astounding's series Probability Zero. Collected in The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2.
  • "Attitude" (September 1943). Novella. Published in Astounding. Collected in The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2 and Travellers of Space (1951).
  • Technical Error" (January 1944). Novelette. Published in Astounding. Collected in Natives of Space, The Best of Hal Clement and The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2.
  • "Trojan Fall" (June 1944). Short story. Published in Astounding. Collected in Small Changes.
  • "Uncommon Sense" (September 1945). His most famous short story. Part of the Laird Cunningham Series. Hugo Award for Best Short Story of 1945. Published in Astounding. Collected in Small Changes, The Best of Hal Clement, Intuit, The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2, The Old Masters (1970), Out of This World 10 (1973) and Nebula Awards Showcase 2000 (2000).
  • "Cold Front" (July 1946). Novelette. Published in Astounding. Collected in The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2, Men Against the Stars (1950, 1956) and Astounding Stories: The 60th Anniversary Collection, Vol. 2 (1990).
  • Assumption Unjustified (oct 1946). Novelette. Published in Astounding. Collected in Natives of Space, The Best of Hal Clement and Crossroads in Time (1953).
  • "Answer" (April 1947). Short story. Published in Astounding SF. Collected in The Best of Hal Clement and Science Fiction Thinking Machines (1954).
  • "Fireproof" (March 1949). Short story. Published in Astounding. Collected in Small Changes, Decade of the 1940s (1975) and Combat SF (1981).
  • "Halo" (October 1952). Novelette. Published in Galaxy. Collected in Small Changes, The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2 and Shadow of Tomorrow (1953).
  • "Critical Factor" (1953). Short story not included in any of the Hal Clement's compilations. Published in Star Science Fiction Stories #2 (1953). Collected in Titan 4 (1977) and The Road to Science Fiction #3: From Heinlein to here (1979).
  • "Ground" (December 1953). Short story not included in any of the Hal Clement's compilations. Published in Science Fiction Adventures.
  • "Dust Rag" (September 1956). Short story. Published in Astounding. Collected in Small Changes, The Best of Hal Clement, Where Do We Go From Here? (1971) and The Prentice Hall Anthology of Science Fiction and Fantasy (2001).
  • "Planet for Plunder" (February 1957). Published in Satellite SF jointly with Sam Merwin, Jr. A previous version of "Planetfall". Collected in Men of the Morning Star/Planet for Plunder.
  • "The Lunar Lichen" (February 1960). Novelette not included in any of the Hal Clement's compilations. Published in Future Science Fiction. Collected in The Time Trap/The Lunar Lichen.
  • "Sun Spot" (November 1960). Short story. Published in Analog. Collected in Small Changes, The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2, Isaac Asimov’s Wonderful Worlds of Science Fiction # 4: Comets (1986) and Analog’s Expanding Universe
  • "The Green World" (May 1963). Novella not included in any of the Hal Clement's compilations. Published in If. Collected in The Moon is Hell!/The Green World.
  • "Hot Planet" (August 1963). Novelette not included in any of the Hal Clement's compilations to date. Published in Galaxy. Collected in The 9th Annual of the Year's Best SF (1964), Spectrum 4 (1965), The Eighth Galaxy Reader (1965), Isaac Asimov Presents the Great SF Stories #25 (1963) (1992) and Science Fiction Century (1997).
  • "Raindrop" (May 1965). Novelette. Published in If. Collected in Small Changes, The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2 and Isaac Asimov’s Wonderful Worlds of Science Fiction # 4: Comets.
  • "The Foundling Stars" (August 1966). Short story. Published in If. Collected in Small Changes and The Second If Reader of Science Fiction (1968).
  • "The Mechanic" (September 1966). Novelette. Published in Analog. Collected in Small Changes, The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2 and Analog: Writers’ Choice, Volume II (1984).
  • "Bulge" (September 1968). Novelette. Published in If. Collected in Small Changes and The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2.
  • '"Planetfall" (1972). Original version of "Planet for Plunder" (1957). Published in Strange Tomorrows (1972). Collected in The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2.
  • "Lecture Demonstration" (1973). Short story from the Mesklin Series (of Mission of Gravity fame). Published in the book Astounding (1973). Collected in The Essential Hal Clement Volume 3, Heavy Planet and Mission of Gravity (1978).
  • "Mistaken for Granted" (January/February 1974). Novella. Published in Worlds of If. Collected in The Best of Hal Clement.
  • "The Logical Life" (1974). Second short story in the Laird Cunningham Series. Published in Stellar #1 (1974). Collected in Intuit and The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2.
  • "Question of Guilt" (1976). Novelette. Published in The Year's Best Horror Stories: Series IV (1976). Collected in The Best of Hal Clement.
  • "Stuck with It" (1976). Novelette innthe Laird Cunningham Series. Published in Stellar #2 (1976). Collected in The Best of Hal Clement, Intuit and The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2].
  • "Longline" (1976). Novelette. Published in Faster than Light (1976). Collected in The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2.
  • "Seasoning" (September/October 1978). Novelette set in Harlan Ellison's Medea world. Not included in any of Hal Clement's compilations. Published in IASFM. Collected in Medea: Harlan's World (1985) and Aliens and UFO's (1993).
  • "Status Symbol" (1987). Novelette, the last story in the Laird Cunningham Series. Published in Intuit. Collected in The Essential Hal Clement Volume 2.
  • "Blot" (1989). Novelette about Asimov's positronic robots. Not included in any of Hal Clement's compilations to date. Published in Foundation's Friends (1989).
  • "Phases in Chaos'" (1991). Novella not included in any of Hal Clement's compilations. Published in Isaac’s Universe Volume Two: Phases in Chaos.
  • "Eyeball Vectors" (1992). Novella not included in any of Clement's compilations to date. Published in Isaac's Universe Volume 3: Unnatural Diplomacy.
  • "Sortie" (spring/summer 1994). First part of the Sortie series. Novella not included in any of Hal Clement's compilations to date. Published in Harsh Mistress.
  • "Settlement" (fall/winter 1994). Second part of the Sortie series. Novella not included in any of Clement's compilations. Published in Absolute Magnitude.
  • "Seismic Sidetrack" (spr 1995). Third part of the Sortie series. Novella not included in any of Hal Clement's compilations to date. Published in Absolute Magnitude.
  • "Simile" (summer 1995). Fourth and last part of the Sortie series. Novella not included in any of Hal Clement's compilations. Published in Absolute Magnitude.
  • "Oh, Natural" (spring 1998). Novelette not included in any of Hal Clement's compilations. Published in Absolute Magnitude. Collected in Hal's Worlds: Stories and Essays in Memory of Hal Clement.
  • Options" (1998). Short story not included in any of Clement's compilations to date. Published as Harry C. Stubbs in Lamps on the Brow.
  • "Exchange Rate" (winter 1999). Novella not included in any of Hal Clement's compilations to date. Published in Absolute Magnitude. Collected in The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Seventeenth Annual Collection and The Hard SF Renaissance (2002).
  • "Under" (January 2000). Short story, last story in the 'Mesklin series. Published in Analog. Collected in The Essential Hal Clement Volume 3 and Heavy Planet.
  • "Office politics" (2003). Short story not included in any of Clement's compilations. Published in Readercon 15 Souvenir Book (This may be an article and not a fiction story)

Books

  • Needle (1950), ISBN 0-380-00635-9 (The first novel in the Needle series. Also published as From Outer Space. Published as young adult fiction although it includes abstract hard science fiction!)
  • Iceworld (1953), ISBN 0-345-25805-3
  • Mission of Gravity (1954), ISBN 0-345-31622-3 (first book in the Mesklin series).
  • The Ranger Boys in Space (1956) (for children)
  • Cycle of Fire (1957), ISBN 0-345-24368-4
  • Close to Critical (1958), ISBN 0-345-24508-3 (part of the Mesklin series. Magazine publication in 1958, book in 1964)
  • Natives of Space (1965), ISBN 0345219503 (three novelettes)
  • Small Changes (1969), ISBN 0709110006 (collection of 9 short stories)
  • Space Lash (1969), ISBN (reprint in paperback of Small Changes)
  • First Flights to the Moon (1970), ASIN B000BCHC4Y (anthology of short stories from others, edited by Hal Clement)
  • Star Light (1971), ISBN 0-345-02361-7 (part of the Mesklin series, sequel to Mission of Gravity. It also shares some characters with Close to Critical)
  • Ocean on Top (1973), ISBN 1-4510-1057-5 (magazine publications in 1967)
  • Left of Africa (1976), ISBN 0936414014 (historical novel for young adults, apparently limited to 750 copies[8])
  • Through the Eye of a Needle (1978), ISBN 0-345-25850-9 (the second and last novel in the Needle series)
  • The Best of Hal Clement (1979), ISBN 0345276892 (collection of 10 short stories, including all of Natives of Space and two from Small Changes: "Uncommon Sense" and "Dust Rag")
  • The Nitrogen Fix (1980), ISBN 0-441-58116-1
  • Intuit (1987), ISBN 0-915368-35-8 (complete collection of the 4 Laird Cunningham stories, edition limited to 820 copies)
  • Still River (1987), ISBN 0-345-32916-3
  • Fossil (1993), ISBN 0-88677-573-6 (set in Isaac Asimov's Universe)
  • Half Life (1999), ISBN 0-312-86920-7 (Humanity is going extinct due to disease, scientists are sent to Titan in the faint hope of finding biochemical clues to a cure)
  • The Essential Hal Clement, Volume 1: Trio for Slide Rule and Typewriter (1999), ISBN 1-886778-06-X (collection of the novels Needle, Iceworld and Close to Critical)
  • The Essential Hal Clement, Volume 2: Music of Many Spheres (2000), ISBN 1-886778-07-8 (collection of 17 short stories, including most from Small Changes and from The Best of Hal Clement)
  • The Essential Hal Clement, Volume 3: Variations on a Theme by Sir Isaac Newton (2000), ISBN 1-886778-08-6 (collection of all Mesklin stories except Close to Critical: Mission of Gravity, Star Light, "Lecture Demonstration" and "Under"; also the how-to-write-science-fiction article "Whirligig World")
  • Heavy Planet (2002), ISBN 0-7653-0368-X (reprint of The Essential Hal Clement, Volume 3)
  • Noise (2003), ISBN 0-7653-0857-6 (set on an ocean planet)
  • Men of the Morning Star/Planet for Plunder (2011), ISBN 978-1-61287-018-2 (two novellas, the first by Edmond Hamilton and the second by Hal Clement and Sam Merwin Jr.)
  • The Moon is Hell!/The Green World (2012), ISBN 978-1-61287-087-8 (two novellas, the first by John W. Campbell Jr. and the second by Hal Clement)
  • The Time Trap/The Lunar Lichen (2013), ISBN 978-1-61287-142-4 (two novellas, the first by Henry Kuttner and the second by Hal Clement)
  • Hal Clement SF Gateway Omnibus (2014), ISBN 978-0575110151 (collection of the novels Iceworld, Cycle of Fire and Close to Critical)

About Hal Clement

Articles and introductions

  • Probability Zero! (nov 1942). Published jointly with Malcolm Jameson, Harry Warner Jr., Dennis Tucker and P. Schuyler Miller in Astounding. About Probability Zero, Harry Harrison said in the John Campbell Memorial Anthology:[9]

"In the early 1940s, in Astounding, there was a small department called Probability Zero! that ran short-short stories. Or items. Or lies. Things. These things were usually funny and always impossible - echoing the description of the title."

Notes

  1. ^ a b As living inductees Clement and Frederik Pohl were preceded in the Hall of Fame by A. E. van Vogt and Jack Williamson, Arthur C. Clarke and Andre Norton.[3]

References

  1. ^ ""Henry Clement Stubbs"". Archived from the original on July 20, 2008. Retrieved 2006-05-30.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link). Rosetta Books (rosettabooks.com). Archived 2008-07-20. Retrieved 2013-03-23.
  2. ^ "Hal Clement, 81, craftsman of sci fi novels". Tom Long. The Boston Globe. October 31, 2003.
  3. ^ a b c "Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame". Mid American Science Fiction and Fantasy Conventions, Inc. Retrieved 2013-03-23. This was the official website of the hall of fame to 2004.
  4. ^ a b "SFWA Grand Master". Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA).
  5. ^ a b c "Clement, Hal". The Locus Index to SF Awards: Index to Literary Nominees. Locus Publications. Retrieved 2013-03-23.
  6. ^ Hal Clement at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB). Retrieved 2013-04-04. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  7. ^ "Submission Guidelines". Golden Duck Awards (goldenduck.org). Archived 2008-05-25. Retrieved 2014-08-14.
  8. ^ http://www.lwcurrey.com/pages/books/112317/hal-clement-harry-clement-stubbs/left-of-africa
  9. ^ http://www.isfdb.org/wiki/index.php/Series:Probability_Zero

External links

47th World Science Fiction Convention

The 47th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Noreascon 3 (or "... Three", or "... III"), was held August 31–September 4, 1989, at the Sheraton-Boston Hotel, Hilton Hotel, Boston Park Plaza, and the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.The chairman was Mark L. Olson. The Guests of Honor were Andre Norton, Ian & Betty Ballantine (pro), and The Stranger Club (fan). Seven surviving members of the latter group—the first known science fiction club in the Boston area, and responsible for organizing Boskone I, New England's first science fiction convention, in 1941—attended, including Harry Stubbs (Hal Clement). Total attendance was 6,837, of 7,795 paid memberships.

7 Billion Needles

7 Billion Needles (Japanese: 70億の針, Hepburn: 70 Oku no Hari) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Nobuaki Tadano and published in North America by Vertical. It was inspired by the 1950 science fiction novel Needle by Hal Clement.

Close to Critical

Close to Critical is a science fiction novel by American writer Hal Clement. The novel was first serialized in three parts and published in Astounding Science Fiction magazine in 1958. Its first hardcover book publication was in July 1964.

Critical Factor

"Critical Factor" is a science fiction short story by American writer Hal Clement, published in 1953.

DNA Publications

DNA Publications was an American publishing company which existed from 1993 to 2007 and was run by the husband-and wife team of Warren Lapine and Angela Kessler, who met at a science fiction convention in Virginia. Initially based in Massachusetts, DNA Publications relocated to Radford, Virginia. As of 2004 it was the second-largest genre magazine publisher in the US. Its first publication, in 1993, was the magazine Harsh Mistress, which Lapine produced in collaboration with Kevin Rogers and Tim Ballon.

DNA Publication distributed or published Aboriginal SF, Absolute Magnitude, Artemis, Dreams of Decadence, Fantastic Stories, Mythic Delirium, The Official KISS Magazine, Science Fiction Chronicle, and The Whole Cat Journal. It also published the book imprints Spyre Books and Wilder Publications. For their work on the magazines, DNA Publications was a 2000 World Fantasy Award nominee, in the "special award: professional" category. Absolute Magnitude was a 2002 Hugo Award nominee in the semiprozine category. Notable authors published by the DNA Publications magazines include Chris Bunch, Hal Clement, Harlan Ellison, Alan Dean Foster, and Allen Steele.

DNA Publications collapsed in early 2007. Weird Tales had been bought in 2005 by Wildside Press and Mythic Delirium, which parted with DNA Publications around the same time. Wilder Publications is now part of Tir Na Nog Press.

Edward E. Smith Memorial Award

The Edward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction, or "Skylark", annually recognizes someone for lifetime contributions to science fiction, "both through work in the field and by exemplifying the personal qualities which made the late "Doc" Smith well-loved by those who knew him." It is presented by the New England Science Fiction Association at its annual convention, Boskone, to someone chosen by a vote of NESFA members. The trophy is a large lens mounted on a simple plinth.The award was inaugurated in 1966, the year after Smith's death. Fifty-one people have been honored in 49 years to 2015 (Hal Clement received the award twice, in 1969 and 1997).

Skylark recipients

Fossil (novel)

Fossil is a science fiction book written by Hal Clement and first printed in November, 1993. Copyright was reserved to him under his real name, Harry C. Stubbs and the company he associated himself with, Tomorrow, Inc..

Golden Duck Award

The Golden Duck Awards for Excellence in Children's Science Fiction were given annually from 1992 to 2017. The awards were presented every year at either Worldcon or the North American Science Fiction Convention (NASFiC). In 2018 they were replaced by Notable Book Lists of the same names sponsored by the Library and Information Technology Association (LITA).

The Golden Duck Awards were funded by Super-Con-Duck-Tivity, Inc., the sponsor of the U.S. midwest regional science fiction convention DucKon. Winners were selected by a group of teachers, librarians, parents, high tech workers and reviewers.

Iceworld

Iceworld is a science fiction novel by American writer Hal Clement. It was published in 1953 by Gnome Press in an edition of 4,000 copies. The novel was originally serialized in the magazine Astounding in 1951.

MIT Science Fiction Society

The MIT Science Fiction Society (or MITSFS) of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a student organization which maintains and administers a large publicly-accessible library of science fiction, fantasy, and science fantasy books and magazines.

Mission of Gravity

Mission of Gravity is a science fiction novel by American writer Hal Clement. The novel was serialized in Astounding Science Fiction magazine in April–July 1953. Its first hardcover book publication was in 1954, and it was first published as a paperback book in 1958. Along with the novel itself, many editions (and most recent editions) of the book also include "Whirligig World", an essay by Clement on creating the planet Mesklin that was first published in the June 1953 Astounding.

Clement published three sequels to Mission of Gravity: a 1970 novel called Star Light, a 1973 short story called "Lecture Demonstration", and a 2000 short story, "Under". Mission of Gravity was nominated for a "Retro Hugo" Award for the year 1954.

NESFA Press

NESFA Press is the publishing arm of the New England Science Fiction Association, Inc. The NESFA Press primarily produces three types of books:

Books honoring the guest(s) of honor at their annual convention, Boskone, and at some Worldcons and other conventions.

Books in the NESFA's Choice series, which bring back into print the works of deserving classic SF writers such as James Schmitz, Cordwainer Smith, C. M. Kornbluth, and Zenna Henderson.

Reference books on science fiction and science fiction fandom.

Needle (novel)

Needle is a 1950 novel written by Hal Clement, originally published the previous year in Astounding Science Fiction magazine. The book was notable in that it broke new ground in the science fiction field by postulating an alien lifeform, not hostile, which could live within the human body. Also published as From Outer Space, the book would, in 1978, spark the sequel Through the Eye of a Needle.

Planetary romance

Planetary romance is a subgenre of science fiction or science fantasy in which the bulk of the action consists of adventures on one or more exotic alien planets, characterized by distinctive physical and cultural backgrounds. Some planetary romances take place against the background of a future culture where travel between worlds by spaceship is commonplace; others, particularly the earliest examples of the genre, do not, and invoke flying carpets, astral projection, or other methods of getting between planets. In either case, it is the planetside adventures which are the focus of the story, not the mode of travel.The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction mentions two caveats as to the usage of the term. First, while the setting may be in an alien world, its nature is of little relevance to the plot, as is the case of James Blish's A Case of Conscience. Second, hard science fiction tales are excluded from this category, where an alien planet, while being a critical component of the plot, is just a background for a primarily scientific endeavor, such as Hal Clement' s Mission of Gravity, possibly with embellishments.

A significant precursor of the genre is Edwin L. Arnold's Lieut. Gullivar Jones: His Vacation (1905).In Science Fiction: The 100 Best Novels (1985), editor and critic David Pringle named Bradley and Anne McCaffrey two "leading practitioners nowadays" for the planetary romance type of science fiction.There is a significant overlap of the genre with that of sword and planet.

Small Changes

Small Changes is a collection of science fiction short stories by Hal Clement, published by Doubleday in 1969. It was issued in Great Britain by Robert Hale Publishing, and reprinted in paperback by Dell Books as Space Lash.

Star Light

Star Light is a science fiction novel by American writer Hal Clement. It is the sequel to one of Clement's earlier books, Mission of Gravity. The novel was serialized in four parts in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Magazine from June to September 1970. Star Light was first published as a paperback book by Ballantine Books in September 1971.

The Nitrogen Fix

The Nitrogen Fix is a 1980 science fiction novel by Hal Clement, and illustrators David B. Mattingly, and Janet Aulisio. The plot revolves around a nomadic family in a future where all oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere has combined with nitrogen, so the atmosphere is mostly nitrogen with traces of water, nitrogen oxides and carbon dioxide, and the seas are very dilute nitric acid.

Uncommon Sense

"Uncommon Sense" is a 1945 science fiction short story by American writer Hal Clement. In 1996, it was retrospectively awarded the 1946 Hugo Award for Best Short Story.

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