HM Prison Isle of Wight

HMP Isle of Wight is a prison on the Isle of Wight, UK, combining the two island prisons, Albany and Parkhurst. The two former prisons along with Camp Hill were merged in 2009 and each site still retained its old name. Across the three sites there were nearly 1,700 prisoners making it one of the largest prisons in the country. The reorganisation took effect on 1 April 2009. In March 2013 Camp Hill closed, reducing the overall prison population by 595.

HMP Isle of Wight
HMP Isle of Wight from Southern Vectis route 1 bus
HMP Isle of Wight
LocationTwo sites in Newport
Security classAdult Male/Category B
Population1,700
Opened2009
Managed byHM Prison Services
GovernorDoug Graham

History

The idea for re-organising the three island prisons was suggested in October 2008 as a way of improving efficiency across the three sites. The plans attracted criticism from prison officers who feared for their jobs and claimed with fewer staff on duty, the safety of staff, inmates and the public was being put at risk. The chairman of the Prison Officer's Association claimed that the main aim of the move was to save around £1.1 million through natural wastage and scrapping eight principal officers' posts. On announcement of the proposals names for new prison were suggested as HMP Solent, HMP Mountbatten, HMP Vectis and the tongue in cheek suggestion "Barry Island" after the governor sent to implement the cluster Barry Greenberry who left in October 2010 to work for the private sector.[1] However none of these new names were implemented and the new name HMP Isle of Wight was announced in March 2009. It was also stated that the individual sites would still retain their old names.[2]

HMP Isle of Wight was officially launched on 1 April 2009. On the day of the launch the prison union slammed the move stating that it had only been done to save money, and would become more of a danger to the public. The Ministry of Justice stated that other similar schemes such as one in the Isle of Sheppy had proved a success and that although there would be a saving of around £1 million this was only being done through better economies and that there was no added danger to the public. The main motivation of "clustering", as the process is known, is cost cutting.[3]

In May 2010 a man dressed as Snoopy and an accomplice failed in their attempt to enter the Albany site in the prison, trying to free a prisoner. The pistol the costumed man carried was a water gun. The person the men were trying to free was actually located in the Camp Hill site at the time.[4]

In January 2013, the Ministry of Justice announced that the Camp Hill site of the prison will close, with a reduction of 595 places at the prison.[5] the prison formally closed in March 2013.[6]

Sites

Site Opened Type Operational capacity Intake
Albany[7] 1967 Adult male/Category B 566 Category B Sex offenders or vulnerable prisoners with sentences of four years or more, with at least 18 months left to serve and eligible for rehabilitation activities.
Parkhurst[8] 1805 Adult male/Category B 497 Sentenced prisoners serving over four years, including vulnerable prisoners, stage 1 and 2 life sentence prisoners and Isle of Wight residents on remand.

References

  1. ^ "Isle of Wight County Press - "Parkhurst name set to disappear"". www.iwcp.co.uk. Retrieved 2009-03-30.
  2. ^ "Isle of Wight County Press - "Prisons to become HMP Isle of Wight"". www.iwcp.co.uk. Retrieved 2009-03-30.
  3. ^ "Isle of Wight County Press - "Prison union slams 'clustering' move"". www.iwcp.co.uk. Retrieved 2009-05-06.
  4. ^ Blake, Heidi. "Man dressed as Snoopy in 'worst attempted jail-break ever'." The Daily Telegraph. 10 May 2010. Retrieved on 13 July 2010.
  5. ^ https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20969898
  6. ^ https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-21686987
  7. ^ "HMP Albany details". HM Prison Service. Retrieved 2010-02-24.
  8. ^ "HMP Parkhurst details". HM Prison Service. Retrieved 2010-02-24.

External links

Coordinates: 50°42′44″N 1°18′18″W / 50.7121°N 1.305°W

2018 New Year Honours

The 2018 New Year Honours are appointments by some of the 16 Commonwealth realms to various orders and honours to recognise and reward good works by citizens of those countries. The New Year Honours are awarded as part of the New Year celebrations at the start of January and were officially announced in The London Gazette on 30 December 2017. Australia, an independent Realm, has a separate honours system and its first honours of the year, the 2018 Australia Day Honours, coincide with Australia Day on 26 January. New Zealand, also an independent Realm, has its own system of honours.

The 2018 honours list includes knighthoods for music legends Ringo Starr — which was reported by the press a week before the list was made public — and Barry Gibb. Veteran actor Hugh Laurie, who was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 2007, was advanced to a Commander of the Order (CBE). Former ballerina Darcey Bussell was created a Dame Commander of the Order (DBE) and Lady Antonia Fraser, author and historian, received the Order of the Companions of Honour.The highest chivalric honour was awarded to Richard Scott, Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry, who was appointed a Knight Companion of the Order of the Thistle, filling the vacancy since the death of Lady Marion Fraser on 25 December 2016. The ancient order is reserved for Scots and is limited to 16 ordinary members.The recipients of honours are displayed as they were styled before their new honour and arranged by the country (in order of precedence) whose ministers advised The Queen on the appointments, then by honour with grades i.e. Knight/Dame Grand Cross, Knight/Dame Commander etc. and then divisions i.e. Civil, Diplomatic and Military as appropriate.

2019 New Year Honours

The 2019 New Year Honours are appointments by some of the 16 Commonwealth realms to various orders and honours to recognise and reward good works by citizens of those countries. The New Year Honours are awarded as part of the New Year celebrations at the start of January and were officially announced in The London Gazette at 22:30 on 28 December 2018. Australia, an independent Realm, has a separate honours system and its first honours of the year, the 2019 Australia Day Honours, coincide with Australia Day on 26 January.

The recipients of honours are displayed as they were styled before their new honour and arranged by the country whose ministers advised The Queen on the appointments, then by the honour and by the honour's grade (i.e. Knight/Dame Grand Cross, Knight/Dame Commander etc.), and then by divisions (i.e. Civil, Diplomatic, and Military), as appropriate.

HM Prison Albany

HMP Isle of Wight – Albany Barracks is a Category B men's prison, situated on the outskirts of Newport on the Isle of Wight, England. The prison is operated by Her Majesty's Prison Service.

Albany Barracks is located next to Parkhurst, another Male/B prison and together they form HM Prison Isle of Wight.

William Goad

William Goad (1944 – 20 October 2012) was a British millionaire businessman from Plymouth, Devon, who was imprisoned for life for child rape.

He was called in various newspapers "Britain's most prolific paedophile",

with his assaults causing two of his victims to commit suicide.

Goad was sent to prison for life in October 2004.

He pleaded guilty to two charges of indecent assault and 14 counts of rape. He was described in court as a “voracious, calculating, predatory and violent homosexual paedophile” who sexually abused young boys over a 30-year period.His abuse spanned 35 years with victims as young as eight. He bought homes overlooking school playgrounds and often had ten boys staying at his home at any one time. They were threatened with harm to their mothers if they talked and were given cash, gifts and employment in Goad's shops. Goad is reported to have boasted of abusing 142 children in a year.Goad's fortune was once estimated to be around £25 million. Goad opened Cornish Market World in 1991, which became at one point Britain's biggest indoor market with more than 300 stalls.

In the mid-1990s Goad launched Ben's Playworld, a children's play zone hosting a range of activities aimed at 2 to 12-year-olds, including mega-slides, giant tubes and a massive ball-pond.One of his victims gave statements in the late 80s and early 90s, which led to his first arrest for indecent assault. Goad was put on probation. As a result of increasing statements from victims, a police investigation, Operation Emotion, had opened up. Goad became aware and changed his name to David Scott and moved to the nearby town of Ivybridge. In 1998 he fled to Thailand on a false passport, aware that police were on his tail following new allegations.

He was arrested in June 2003 after returning to UK on a false passport. A bank employee had tipped the police off, following his credit card use in the UK. He was arrested while travelling on a train with his financial advisor and business associate; he was immediately rushed to hospital following chest complaints. He required heart surgery before being fit to stand in court. During Goad's ill-health Operation Emotion II had been under way by police and had persuaded 17 victims to testify at trial against him. Initially Goad pleaded not guilty to the charges and claimed he was sexually abused at a younger age. Eventually, following overwhelming evidence and comments from the judge to his legal defence, he pleaded guilty. At his sentencing, Martin Meeke QC stated "It is believed there has been no single defendant with more victims than this man". Goad died of natural causes at HMP Isle of Wight, Albany on 20 October 2012.

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