H. Bedford-Jones

Henry James O'Brien Bedford-Jones (April 29, 1887 – May 6, 1949) was a Canadian historical, adventure fantasy, science fiction, crime and Western writer who became a naturalized United States citizen in 1908.

H. Bedford-Jones
BornApril 29, 1887
Napanee, Ontario, Canada
DiedMay 6, 1949 (aged 62)
Beverly Hills, California, United States
Pen nameDonald Bedford, Montague Brissard, Cleveland B. Chase, Paul Ferval, Michael Gallister, Allan Hawkwood, Gordon Keyne, M. Lassez, George Souli de Mourant, Lucian Pemjean, Margaret Love Sangerson, Charles George Souli, Gordon Stuart, Elliot Whitney, John Wycliffe[1]
Occupationshort story writer, novelist
NationalityCanada, United States
GenreHistorical fiction Adventure, Science fiction, Fantasy
Argosy 191601
Bedford-Jones's "Comrade Island" was the cover story in the January 1916 issue of The Argosy
Magic carpet 193307 v3 n3
Bedford-Jones's novelette "Pearls from Macao" took the cover of the July 1933 issue of Magic Carpet
Weird Tales July 1940
Bedford-Jones's "The Artificial Honeymoon" was the cover story in the July 1940 Weird Tales

Career

After being encouraged to try writing by his friend, writer William Wallace Cook, Bedford-Jones began writing dime novels and pulp magazine stories.[2] Bedford-Jones was an enormously prolific writer; the pulp editor Harold Hersey once recalled meeting Bedford-Jones in Paris, where he was working on two novels simultaneously, each story on its own separate typewriter.[2] Bedford-Jones cited Alexandre Dumas as his main influence, and wrote a sequel to Dumas' The Three Musketeers, D'Artagnan (1928).[3] He wrote over 100 novels, earning the nickname "King of the Pulps". His works appeared in a number of pulp magazines. Bedford-Jones' main publisher was Blue Book magazine; he also appeared in Adventure, All-Story Weekly, Argosy, Short Stories, Top-Notch Magazine, The Magic Carpet/Oriental Stories, Golden Fleece, Ace-High Magazine, People's Story Magazine, Hutchinson's Adventure-Story Magazine, Detective Fiction Weekly, Western Story Magazine, and Weird Tales.

In addition to writing fiction, Bedford-Jones also worked as a journalist for the Boston Globe, and wrote poetry.[2] Bedford-Jones was a friend of Erle Stanley Gardner and Vincent Starrett. [4][5]

Works

partial list

  • Blood Royal (1914)
  • The Seal of John Solomon (1915)
  • Gentleman Solomon (1915)
  • Solomon's Carpet (1915)
  • Solomon's Quest (1915)
  • John Solomon (1916)
  • John Solomon, Retired (1917)
  • Sword Flame (1918)
  • Arizona Argonauts (1920)
  • Pirates' Gold (1920)
  • The Temple of the Ten (with W. C. Robertson, 1921, book form 1973)
  • The Shadow (1922)
  • John Solomon, Supercargo (1924)
  • The Seal of Solomon (1924)
  • Splendour of the Gods (1924)
  • The Star Woman (1924)
  • John Solomon, Incognito (1925)
  • The Shawl of Solomon (1925)
  • Solomon's Carpet (1926)
  • Solomon's Quest (1926)
  • D'Artagnan (1928)
  • The Wizard of Atlas (1928)
  • The Opium Ship (2005)
  • The House of Skulls and other Tales from the Pulps (2006)
  • The Golden Goshawk (2009)
  • The Master of Dragons (2011)
  • The Rajah from Hell (2012)
  • The Saga of Thady Shea (2013)
  • Wilderness Trail (2013)

References

  1. ^ Michael Ashley (1978). Who's Who in Horror and Fantasy Fiction. Elm tree Books. p. 30. ISB0-241-89528-6.
  2. ^ a b c Mike Ashley, "Bedford Jones, H(enry James O'Brien)", in St. James Guide To Fantasy Writers, edited by David Pringle, St. James Press, 1996, ISBN 1-55862-205-5, p. 51-3.
  3. ^ Bernard A. Drew, Literary afterlife: the posthumous continuations of 325 authors' fictional characters. McFarland, 2010, ISBN 0-7864-4179-8 (pp. 43-44).
  4. ^ H. Bedford-Jones: "King of the Pulps" by Peter Ruber Archived January 12, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Vincent Starrett, Born in a bookshop; chapters from the Chicago Renascence." Norman, University of Oklahoma Press,1965.

Sources

External links

Adventure (magazine)

Adventure was an American pulp magazine that was first published in November 1910 by

the Ridgway company, an offshoot of the Butterick Publishing Company. Adventure went on to become one of the most profitable and critically acclaimed of all the American pulp magazines. The magazine had 881 issues. The magazine's first editor was Trumbull White, he was succeeded in 1912 by Arthur Sullivant Hoffman (1876–1966), who would edit the magazine until 1927.

Adventure Tales

Adventure Tales is an irregularly published magazine reprinting classic stories from pulp magazines of the early 20th century. It is edited by science fiction writer John Gregory Betancourt and published by Wildside Press. In 2011 it was published biannually. Each issue has a theme or a featured author related to pulp magazines. Its headquarters is in Rockville, Maryland.

Issue #1 (2006) featured prolific pulp writer Hugh B. Cave.

Contents: "Skulls," by H. Bedford Jones; "Under the Flame Trees," by H. de Vere Stacpoole; "Rats Ashore," by Charles C. Young; "The Evil Eye," by Vincent Starrett; "Watson!" by Captain A. E. Dingle; "Island Feud," by Hugh B. Cave; "The Man Who Couldn't Die," by Hugh B. Cave;

Issue #2 (2006) featured pulp writer Nelson Bond.

Includes work by Dorothy Quick, Achmed Abdullah, John D. Swain, Christopher B. Booth, Harold Lamb, Nelson Bond, and Arthur O. Friel.

Issue #3 (2006) featured pulp writer Murray Leinster.

Other contents includes: "Land Sharks and Others," by H. Bedford-Jones; "Light on a Subject," by Raymond S. Spears; "Channa's Tabu," by Harold Lamb; "Forbidden Fruit," by John D. Swain; "Kill That Headline," by Robert Leslie Bellem; "The Floating Island," by Philip M. Fisher; Africa," by George Allan England. A special book-paper edition included extra content: "Nerve" and "The Street of Magnificent Dreams," by Murray Leinster; "The Moon-Calves," by Raymond S. Spears; and "Pirates' Gold," by H. Bedford-Jones.

Issue #4 (2007) featured pulp writers associated with Weird Tales magazine.

Contents: "The Monkey God," by Seabury Quinn; "Double-Shuffle," by Edwin Baird; "Every Man a King," by E. Hoffmann Price; "Blind Man's Bluff," by Edwin Baird; "The Mad Detective," by John D. Swain; "Son of the White wolf," by Robert E. Howard; "Adventure," by Clark Ashton Smith (verse); "Astrophobos," by H.P. Lovecraft (verse); "Always Comes Evening," by Robert E. Howard (verse)

Issue #5 (2008) featured pulp writer Achmed Abdullah.

Contents: "Their Own Dear Land," by Achmed Abdullah; "The Pearls of Paruki," by J. Allan Dunn; "The Midmatch Tragedy," by Vincent Starrett; "The Remittance Woman," by Achmed Abdullah.

Issue #6 (2010) featured pulp writer H. Bedford-Jones.

Contents: "The Fugitive Statue," by Vincent Starrett; "Miracle," by John D. Swain; "Mustered Out," by H. Beford-Jones; "The Devil's Heirloom," by Anthony M. Rud; "The Tapir," by Arthur O. Friel; "Thubway Tham's Dog," by Johnston McCulley; "The Badman's Brand," by H. Bedford-Jones; "Lancelot Biggs Cooks a Pirate," by Nelson S. Bond; "Surprise in Sulphur Springs," by Bedford-Jones; "Payable to Bearer," by Talbot Mundy; plus a facsimile reprint of the first issue of AMRA, the fantasy fanzine.

Adventure fiction

Adventure fiction is fiction that usually presents danger, or gives the reader a sense of excitement.

Altus Press

Altus Press is a publisher of works primarily related to the pulp magazines from the 1910s to the 1950s.

Argosy (magazine)

Argosy, later titled The Argosy and Argosy All-Story Weekly, was an American pulp magazine from 1882 through 1978, published by Frank Munsey. It is the first American pulp magazine. The magazine began as a children's weekly story–paper entitled The Golden Argosy.

Blue Book (magazine)

Blue Book was a popular 20th-century American magazine with a lengthy 70-year run under various titles from 1905 to 1975. It was a sibling magazine to Redbook and The Green Book Magazine.

Launched as The Monthly Story Magazine, it was published under that title from May 1905 to August 1906 with a change to The Monthly Story Blue Book Magazine for issues from September 1906 to April 1907. In its early days, Blue Book also carried a supplement on theatre actors called "Stageland". The magazine was aimed at both male and female readers.For the next 45 years (May 1907 to January 1952), it was known as The Blue Book Magazine, Blue Book Magazine, Blue Book, and Blue Book of Fiction and Adventure. The title was shortened with the February 1952 issue to simply Bluebook, continuing until May 1956. With a more exploitative angle, the magazine was revived with an October 1960 issue as Bluebook for Men, and the title again became Bluebook for the final run from 1967 to 1975.

In its 1920s heyday, Blue Book was regarded as one of the "Big Four" pulp magazines (the best-selling, highest-paying and most critically acclaimed pulps), along with Adventure, Argosy and Short Stories.

Elliot Whitney

Elliot Whitney was a group pseudonym used by various authors including:

H. Bedford-Jones

Harry Lincoln Sayler

Greater Napanee

Greater Napanee is a town in Southeastern Ontario, Canada, approximately 45 kilometres (28 mi) west of Kingston and the county seat of Lennox and Addington County. It is located on the eastern end of the Bay of Quinte. Greater Napanee municipality was created by amalgamating the old Town of Napanee with the townships of Adolphustown, North and South Fredericksburgh, and Richmond in 1999. Greater Napanee is co-extensive with the original Lennox County.

The town is home to the Allan Macpherson House, a historic 1826 property that is now a museum. Macpherson was a major in the Lennox militia, operated the town's grist and saw mills, as well as the distillery and general store. He served as post master and land agent, operated the first local printing press and helped fund the establishment of many local schools and churches. The home sits on the banks of the Napanee River, which runs through the town.

The largest employer is a Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company plant.The main streets are Dundas Street (east-west) and Centre Street (north-south). Dundas Street is part of former provincial Highway #2, also known as Kingston Road, and travels through downtown from Toronto in the west and onward to Kingston in the east. Centre Street travels through the centre of the town from the modern commercial area close to Highway 401 to the downtown and onwards, as County Road 8 to Lake Ontario.

Harry Whittington (author)

Harry Whittington (February 4, 1915 – June 11, 1989) was an American mystery novelist and one of the original founders of the paperback novel. Born in Ocala, Florida, he worked in government jobs before becoming a writer.

His reputation as a prolific writer of pulp fiction novels is supported by his writing of 85 novels in a span of twelve years (as many as seven in a single month) mostly in the crime, suspense, and hardboiled noir fiction genres. In total, he published over 200 novels. Seven of his writings were produced for the screen, including the television series Lawman. His reputation as 'The King of the Pulps' is shared with author H. Bedford-Jones. Eight of Whittington's hardboiled noir novels were republished by Stark House Press.

List of Harlequin Romance novels released in 1953

This is a list of Harlequin Romance novels released in 1953.

Oriental Stories

Oriental Stories, later retitled The Magic Carpet Magazine, was an American pulp magazine of 1930-34, an offshoot of the famous Weird Tales.

Like its parent, it was published by J.C. Henneberger's Popular Fiction Publishing and edited by Farnsworth Wright. As its titles indicate, the magazine specialized in adventure and fantasy stories with Oriental settings and elements. Its stories were largely written by the same distinctive group of authors that filled the pages of Weird Tales, including Robert E. Howard, Otis Adelbert Kline, E. Hoffmann Price, Clark Ashton Smith, and Frank Owen, among others.The magazine struggled financially for the entirety of its existence (as indeed did Weird Tales); it was published first bi-monthly, then quarterly, during the grimmest years of the Great Depression. Volume 1 of Oriental Stories consisted of 6 issues that appeared on newsstands from October 1930 through Autumn 1931; Volume 2 comprised only 3 issues in the first half of 1932 (Winter, Spring, Summer). After a six-month hiatus, the first of four quarterly issues of Volume 3 appeared in January 1933, but with the new title The Magic Carpet. ("Oriental Stories combined with The Magic Carpet Magazine," read the masthead of Vol. 3 No. 1, January 1933.)

One notable contributor to The Magic Carpet was popular pulp author H. Bedford-Jones. Still unable to muster sufficient circulation, Volume 4 started and ended with the single issue No. 1 in January 1934. The Magic Carpet was then defunct.

Pulp magazine

Pulp magazines (often referred to as "the pulps") were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the 1950s. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called "glossies" or "slicks". The typical pulp magazine had 128 pages; it was 7 inches (18 cm) wide by 10 inches (25 cm) high, and 0.5 inches (1.3 cm) thick, with ragged, untrimmed edges.

The pulps gave rise to the term pulp fiction in reference to run-of-the-mill, low-quality literature. Pulps were the successors to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short-fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines were best known for their lurid, exploitative, and sensational subject matter. Modern superhero comic books are sometimes considered descendants of "hero pulps"; pulp magazines often featured illustrated novel-length stories of heroic characters, such as Flash Gordon, The Shadow, Doc Savage, and The Phantom Detective.

Short Stories (magazine)

Short Stories was an American fiction magazine that existed between 1890 and 1959.

Sword and sorcery

Sword and sorcery (S&S) is a subgenre of fantasy characterized by sword-wielding heroes engaged in exciting and violent adventures. An element of romance is often present, as is an element of magic and the supernatural. Unlike works of high fantasy, the tales, though dramatic, focus mainly on personal battles rather than world-endangering matters. Sword and sorcery commonly overlaps with heroic fantasy.

The Temple of the Ten

The Temple of the Ten is a fantasy novel by H. Bedford-Jones and W. C. Robertson. It was first published in book form in 1973 by Donald M. Grant, Publisher, Inc. in an edition of 1,000 copies. The novel originally appeared in the magazine Adventure in 1921.

The Thrill Book

The Thrill Book was a U.S. pulp magazine published by Street & Smith in 1919. It was intended to carry "different" stories: this meant stories that were unusual or unclassifiable, which in practice often meant that the stories were fantasy or science fiction. The first eight issues, edited by Harold Hersey, were a mixture of adventure and weird stories. Contributors included Greye La Spina, Charles Fulton Oursler, J. H. Coryell, and Seabury Quinn. Hersey was replaced by Ronald Oliphant with the July 1 issue, probably because Street & Smith were unhappy with his performance.

Oliphant printed more science fiction and fantasy than Hersey had done, though this included two stories by Murray Leinster which Hersey had purchased before being replaced. The most famous story from The Thrill Book is The Heads of Cerberus, a very early example of a novel about alternate time tracks, by Francis Stevens. Oliphant was given a larger budget than Hersey, and was able to acquire material by popular writers such as H. Bedford-Jones, but he was only able to produce eight more issues before the end came. The last issue was dated October 15, 1919; it was probably cancelled because of poor sales, although a printers' strike at that time may have been a factor.

Although The Thrill Book has been described as the first American pulp to specialize in fantasy and science fiction, this description is not supported by recent historians of the field, who regard it instead as a stepping stone on the path that ultimately led to Weird Tales and Amazing Stories, the first true specialized magazines in the fields of weird fiction and science fiction respectively.

The d'Artagnan Romances

The d'Artagnan Romances are a set of three novels by Alexandre Dumas (1802–1870), telling the story of the 17th-century musketeer d'Artagnan.

Dumas based the character and attributes of d'Artagnan on captain of musketeers Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan (c. 1611–1673) and the portrayal was particularly indebted to d'Artagnan's semi-fictionalized memoirs as written up 27 years after the hero's death by Gatien de Courtilz de Sandras (published 1700).The three novels are:

The Three Musketeers, set between 1625 and 1628; first published in serial form in the magazine Le Siècle between March and July 1844. Dumas claims in the foreword to have based it on manuscripts he had discovered in the Bibliothèque Nationale.

Twenty Years After, set between 1648 and 1649; serialized from January to August, 1845.

The Vicomte of Bragelonne: Ten Years Later, set between 1660 and 1673; serialized from October 1847 to January 1850. This vast novel has been split into three, four, or five volumes at various points.

In the three-volume edition, the novels are titled The Vicomte de Bragelonne, Louise de la Vallière and The Man in the Iron Mask.

In the four-volume edition, the novels are titled The Vicomte de Bragelonne, Ten Years Later, Louise de la Vallière and The Man in the Iron Mask.

The five-volume edition generally does not give titles to the smaller portions.Five further sequels to the D'Artagnan books – the novels The Son of Porthos (1883) and D'Artagnan Kingmaker (1900), The King’s Passport (1925), D'Artagnan, the sequel to the Three Musketeers – were written and published after Dumas's death. d'Artagnan does not appear in the first novel, which, although written by Paul Mahalin, was published under the pen name "Alexandre Dumas" and is still sold as such. The second novel was supposedly based on one of Dumas' plays. The last two were written by H. Bedford-Jones. There is an additional book published by Alexandre Dumas entitled The Red Sphinx: A Sequal To The Three Musketeers.

Western Story Magazine

Western Story Magazine was a pulp magazine published by Street & Smith, which ran from 1919 to 1949. It was the first of numerous pulp magazines devoted to Western fiction. In its heyday, Western Story Magazine was one of the most successful pulp magazines; in 1921 the magazine was selling over half a million copies each issue. The headquarters was in New York City.

Wycliffe (name)

Wycliffe is a given name and surname.

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