Guy Royle

Admiral Sir Guy Charles Cecil Royle KCB, CMG (17 August 1885 – 4 January 1954) was a Royal Navy officer who went on to be Fifth Sea Lord and First Naval Member of the Royal Australian Navy.

Sir Guy Charles Cecil Royle
Vice Admiral Royle WWII IWM A 20781
Vice Admiral Royle as Chief of Australian Naval Staff during the Second World War
Born17 August 1885
Esher, Surrey
Died4 January 1954 (aged 68)
Ferndown, Dorset
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Navy
Years of service1900–1946
RankAdmiral
Commands heldChief of the Australian Naval Staff (1941–45)
HMS Glorious (1933–34)
HMS Excellent (1930–32)
HMS Canterbury (1927–29)
Battles/warsFirst World War
Second World War
AwardsKnight Commander of the Order of the Bath
Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George
Legion of Merit (United States)
Order of Orange-Nassau (Netherlands)

Naval career

Royle joined the Royal Navy with a commission as a midshipman in 1900.[1]

He served in the First World War as Gunnery Officer on the battleship HMS Marlborough and was at the Battle of Jutland in 1916,[2] then on the staff of Admiral Sir Charles Madden in the Grand Fleet.[2] By 1919 he had been promoted commander and in July 1919 was appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George "for valuable services as Gunnery officer of H. M. S. "Marlborough", 1st Battle Squadron, and as Flag Commander to the Admiral, Second in Command, Grand Fleet."[3]

Royle was appointed Assistant to the Deputy Director of Naval Ordnance in 1923 and became Naval attaché in Tokyo in 1924.[2] He was given command of the cruiser HMS Canterbury in 1927, the shore establishment HMS Excellent in 1930 and the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious in 1933.[2] He went on to be Naval Secretary from 1934 and to 1937, when he was appointed Vice Admiral commanding the aircraft carriers, serving until 1939. In the Second World War, he returned briefly as Naval Secretary from September to November, 1939, then until 1941 was Fifth Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Air Service, when he became First Naval Member of the Australian Commonwealth Naval Board; he retired the service in 1946.[1][2]

Royle was knighted in 1941 and promoted admiral in 1942.[1]

In retirement he was appointed briefly as Secretary to the Lord Great Chamberlain and finally as Yeoman Usher (deputy) of the Black Rod,[4] a ceremonial position in the House of Lords, serving in that office from 1946 to 1953.[5] He collapsed and died while putting out a heath fire near his home at Wimborne Minster in Dorset.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b c Winston Churchill, ed. Martin Gilbert, The Churchill War Papers: At the Admiralty, September 1939 – May 1940 (1993), p. 354
  2. ^ a b c d e Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives
  3. ^ London Gazette, Issue 31461 (supplement), 15 July 1919, Page 9107
  4. ^ House of Lords Offices Hansard, 9 December 1953
  5. ^ Black Rod, 1361- at parliament.uk, accessed 23 November 2010
  6. ^ Admiral Sir Guy Royle Flight International, 15 January 1954
Military offices
Preceded by
Sidney Meyrick
Naval Secretary
1934–1937
Succeeded by
William Whitworth
Preceded by
Sir Alexander Ramsay
Fifth Sea Lord
1939–1941
Succeeded by
Sir Lumley Lyster
Preceded by
Sir Ragnar Colvin
Chief of the Australian Naval Staff
1941–1945
Succeeded by
Sir Louis Hamilton
Allan Everett (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral Sir Allan Frederic Everett (22 February 1868 – 22 January 1938) was a Royal Navy officer who served as First Naval Member and Chief of the Australian Naval Staff from 1921 to 1923.

Chief of Navy (Australia)

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Vice Admiral Michael Noonan is the current chief of navy; he assumed the position on 06 July 2018.

David Leach (admiral)

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David Shackleton (admiral)

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Donald Chalmers

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Hastings Harrington

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Ian MacDougall

Vice Admiral Ian Donald George MacDougall (born 23 February 1938) is a retired senior commander of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), who served as Chief of Naval Staff from 1991 to 1994. He also served as Commissioner of New South Wales Fire Brigades, and is Patron of the Submarines Association Australia.

List of Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty

This is a list of Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty (incomplete before the Restoration, 1660).

The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty were the members of The Board of Admiralty, which exercised the office of Lord High Admiral when it was not vested in a single person. The commissioners were a mixture of politicians without naval experience and professional naval officers, the proportion of naval officers generally increasing over time. In 1940, the Secretary of the Admiralty, a civil servant, became a member of the Board. The Lord High Admiral, and thus the Board of Admiralty, ceased to have operational command of the Royal Navy when the three service ministries were merged into the Ministry of Defence in 1964, when the office of Lord High Admiral reverted to the Crown.

Louis Keppel Hamilton

Admiral Sir Louis Henry Keppel Hamilton (31 December 1890 – 27 June 1957) was a senior Royal Navy officer who was Flag Officer in Malta (1943–45) and later served as First Naval Member and Chief of Staff of the Royal Australian Navy. During his early career he was generally known as L. H. Keppel Hamilton.

Lumley Lyster

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Michael Noonan (admiral)

Vice Admiral Michael Joseph Noonan, (born 13 December 1966) is a senior officer in the Royal Australian Navy and the current Chief of Navy since 6 July 2018. He previously served as Commander Border Protection Command from 2013 to 2015, and Deputy Chief of Navy from January 2016 until March 2018.

Percy Grant (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral Sir Edmund Percy Fenwick George Grant, (23 September 1867 – 8 September 1952) was a Royal Navy officer who served as First Naval Member and Chief of the Australian Naval Staff from 1919 to 1921.

Ragnar Colvin

Admiral Sir Ragnar Musgrave Colvin, (7 May 1882 – 22 February 1954) was a long-serving Royal Navy officer who commanded the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) at the outbreak of the Second World War.

Royle

Royle may refer to:

People:

Adrian Royle (born 1959), retired English long distance runner

Anthony Royle, Baron Fanshawe of Richmond (1927–2001), British politician and businessman, son of Lancelot Royle

Arthur Royle, English rugby union footballer of the 1880s

Arthur Royle (priest) (1895–1973), Church of England Archdeacon of Huntingdon

Carol Royle, English actress

Charles Royle, Baron Royle (1896–1975), British businessman and politician

Charles Royle (Liberal politician) (1872–1963), English politician

David Royle (disambiguation), two people

Derek Royle (1928–1990), British actor

Edward Royle, British historian

Edwin Milton Royle (1862–1942), American playwright

Gordon Royle, Australian mathematician and professor

Guy Royle (1885–1954), Royal Navy admiral, Fifth Sea Lord and First Naval Member of the Royal Australian Navy

Jen Royle (born 1974), former American sports reporter and chef

Joe Royle (born 1949), English football player and manager

John Forbes Royle (1799–1858), British botanist

Joseph Royle (1732–1766), colonial American newspaper publisher and printer

Lancelot Royle (1898–1978), British sprinter and businessman, son of Vernon Royle

Nicholas Royle (born 1963), English novelist, editor, publisher and literary reviewer

Nick Royle (born 1983), English rugby union players

Pam Royle (born 1958), British television presenter and journalist

Paul Royle (1914–2015), Australian Royal Air Force pilot, one of the last two survivors of the Second World War "Great Escape" from a German POW camp

Roger Royle (born 1939), Anglican priest and television presenter

Selena Royle (1904–1983), American actress, daughter of Edwin Royle

Stanley Royle (1888–1961), English landscape painter and illustrator

Timothy Royle (born 1931), businessman, son of Lancelot Royle

Vernon Royle (1854–1929), English cricketerFictional characters:

the title characters in The Royle Family, a television comedy series

Joan Daisy Royle, in That Royle Girl, a 1925 film directed by D. W. Griffith

Eddie Royle (EastEnders), in the soap opera EastEnders

John Royle (EastEnders), in the soap opera EastEnders

Sidney Meyrick

Admiral Sir Sidney Julius Meyrick KCB (28 March 1879 – 18 December 1973) was a Royal Navy officer who went on to be Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station.

Tim Barrett (admiral)

Vice Admiral Timothy William Barrett, (born 8 January 1959) is a retired senior officer in the Royal Australian Navy. Barrett served as Commander Australian Fleet from 2011 to 2014, before being appointed Chief of Navy in June 2014. He retired in July 2018 after four years as navy chief and 42 years in the navy.

William Munro Kerr

Vice Admiral Sir William Munro Kerr (4 March 1876 – 26 October 1959) was a Royal Navy officer who served as First Naval Member and Chief of the Australian Naval Staff from 1929 to 1931.

William Napier (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral William Rawdon Napier, (13 June 1877 – 8 April 1951) was a Royal Navy officer who served as First Naval Member and Chief of the Australian Naval Staff from 1926 to 1929.

William Whitworth

Admiral Sir William Jock Whitworth KCB DSO (29 June 1884 – 25 October 1973) was a senior Royal Navy officer who went on to be Second Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Personnel.

Director,
Commonwealth Naval Forces
First Naval Members,
Australian Commonwealth Naval Board
Chiefs of the Naval Staff
Chiefs of Navy

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