Grotto of the Dancing Deer

"Grotto of the Dancing Deer" is one of Clifford D. Simak's later short stories. It won the 1980 Nebula Award for Best Short Story and the 1981 Hugo Award for Best Short Story and Locus Award for Best Short Story. It involves an archaeologist discovering an ancient painting and its painter, an immortal.[1]

"Grotto of the Dancing Deer"
AuthorClifford D. Simak
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Genre(s)Science fiction short story
Published inAnalog Science Fiction/Science Fact
Publication typePeriodical
PublisherCondé Nast Publications, Inc.
Media typePrint (Magazine, Hardback & Paperback)
Publication dateApril 1980

References

  1. ^ Whyte, Nicholas (January 8, 2006). "Review: Grotto of the Dancing Deer, by Clifford D. Simak". Retrieved September 23, 2015.

External links

Awards
Preceded by
"The Way of Cross and Dragon"
by George R. R. Martin
Hugo Award for Best Short Story
1981
Succeeded by
"The Pusher"
by John Varley
39th World Science Fiction Convention

The 39th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Denvention II, was held September 3–7, 1981, at the Denver Hilton Hotel in Denver, Colorado, United States.

The chairmen were Suzanne Carnival and Don C. Thompson. The guests of honor were Clifford D. Simak (pro), C. L. Moore (pro), and Rusty Hevelin (fan). Extra special guest was Robert Heinlein who had been the guest of honor at the 1941 Worldcon, the first to be held in Denver. The toastmaster was Ed Bryant. Total attendance was 3,792.

A Walk in the Sun (short story)

"A Walk in the Sun" is a science fiction short story published in 1991 by American writer Geoffrey A. Landis. It won the 1992 Hugo Award for Best Short Story, the 1992 Asimov's Reader Poll Award and was nominated for the 1992 Locus Award.

Bears Discover Fire

"Bears Discover Fire" is a science fiction short story by American science fiction author Terry Bisson. It concerns aging and evolution in the US South, the dream of wilderness, and community. The premise is that bears have discovered fire, and are having campfires on highway medians.

It was originally published in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine in August 1990.

Boobs (short story)

"Boobs" is a fantasy short story by Suzy McKee Charnas. It was first published in Asimov's Science Fiction, in July 1989.

Clifford D. Simak

Clifford Donald Simak (; August 3, 1904 – April 25, 1988) was an American science fiction writer. He won three Hugo Awards and one Nebula Award. The Science Fiction Writers of America made him its third SFWA Grand Master, and the Horror Writers Association made him one of three inaugural winners of the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Fermi and Frost

"Fermi and Frost" is a science fiction short story by Frederik Pohl, first published in the January 1985 issue of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine. It won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1986.

Immortals (anthology)

Immortals (ISBN 0-441-00539-X) is a 1998 anthology of science fiction short stories edited by American writers Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois.

Kirinyaga (short story)

"Kirinyaga" is a science fiction short story published in 1988 by Mike Resnick and is the first chapter in the book by the same name. The story was the winner of the 1989 Hugo Award for Best Short Story and the 1989 SF Chronicle Award. It was also nominated for the 1989 Nebula Award for Best Novelette as well as the 1989 Locus award.

Locus Award for Best Short Story

The Locus Award for Best Short Story is one of a series of Locus Awards given every year by Locus Magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The first award in this category was presented in 1971.

None So Blind

"None So Blind" is a science fiction short story by Joe Haldeman. It won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story and the Locus Award for Short Story in 1995, was nominated for the Nebula Award in 1994.

Scherzo with Tyrannosaur

"Scherzo with Tyrannosaur" is a science fiction short story published in 1999 by Michael Swanwick, later expanded into the novel Bones of the Earth. It won the 2000 Hugo Award for Best Short Story, was nominated for the Nebula Award, placed third in the 2000 Locus Poll, and placed fourth in the Asimov's Science Fiction Reader Poll.

The 43 Antarean Dynasties

"The 43 Antarean Dynasties" is a science fiction short story published in 1997 by Mike Resnick. It won the 1998 Hugo Award for Best Short Story. The story itself can be considered as a science fictional spin on the study of postcolonialism.

The Best Science Fiction of the Year 10

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #10 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the tenth volume in a series of sixteen. It was first published in paperback by Pocket Books in July 1981, and in trade paperback and hardcover and trade paperback (the latter under the slightly variant title The Best Science Fiction of the Year: No. 10) by Gollancz in the same year.

The book collects twelve novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction, notes and concluding essays by Carr and Charles N. Brown. The stories were previously published in 1980 in the magazines Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, TriQuarterly, Playboy, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, and Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, and the anthologies New Voices III: The Campbell Award Nominees, Universe 10, Their Immortal Hearts, and Interfaces.

The Crystal Spheres

"The Crystal Spheres" is a science fiction short story by American writer David Brin, originally published in the January 1984 issue of Analog and collected in The River of Time. It won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story 1985. In it, Brin presents an explanation for the Fermi Paradox.

The Lincoln Train

"The Lincoln Train" is an alternate history short story published by Maureen F. McHugh, published in 1995. It is collected in volume 31 of the Nebula Awards anthologies, in Alternate Tyrants, and in Best of the Best: 20 Years of the Year's Best Science Fiction.

The Soul Selects Her Own Society

The Soul Selects Her Own Society: Invasion and Repulsion: A Chronological Reinterpretation of Two of Emily Dickinson's Poems: A Wellsian Perspective is a 1996 science fiction short story by Connie Willis. It was first published in Asimov's Science Fiction in April 1996, but written for the anthology War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches, in which it was published in June 1996; it was subsequently republished in War of the Worlds: Fresh Perspectives on the H. G. Wells Classic (2005), in This is My Funniest: Leading Science Fiction Writers Present Their Funniest Stories Ever (2006), in The Winds of Marble Arch and Other Stories (2007), and in The Best of Connie Willis: Award-Winning Stories (2013).

The Very Pulse of the Machine

"The Very Pulse of the Machine" is a science fiction short story published in 1998 by Michael Swanwick. It was the winner of the 1999 Hugo Award for Best Short Story. It was also nominated for the 1999 Locus award and Asimov's Reader Poll.

Why I Left Harry's All-Night Hamburgers

"Why I Left Harry's All-Night Hamburgers" is a science fiction short story by Lawrence Watt-Evans. It was first published in Asimov's Science Fiction.

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