Grilling

Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above or below.[1] Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill), or griddle (a flat plate heated from below).[2]

Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily through thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is called broiling.[3] In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is through thermal radiation.

Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma and flavor from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).[4]

Studies have shown that cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines, benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens.[5][6] Marination may reduce the formation of these compounds.[7] Grilling is often presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oils, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.[8]

Grillen - BBQ - Barbeque - Fleisch auf dem Grill
Steaks and chicken breasts being grilled over charcoal
Hamburguesas grill
Hamburgers being grilled over a charcoal fire
Grilling - Mangal
Grilling mangals and kebabs

Regional variations

Konro Bakar 2
Grilling konro bakar, spicy beef ribs.

Asia

Japanese Shichirin HIbachi Conro
Japanese traditional portable charcoal grill "Shichirin"

In Japanese cities, yakitori carts, restaurants, or shops can be found. These contain charcoal-fired grills and marinated grilled meat on a stick. Yakiniku is a type of food where meat and/or vegetables are grilled directly over small charcoal or gas grills at high temperatures. (This style of cooking has become popular throughout Asia.) In Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and Thailand, a popular food item from food vendors is satay, which is marinated meat on a bamboo skewer grilled over a charcoal fire and served with peanut (sate) sauce.

Germany

Bratwürste auf dem Grill
Grilled bratwurst

In Germany, the most prominent outdoor form of grilling is using the gridiron over a bed of burning charcoal. Care is taken that the charcoal does not produce flames. Often beer is sprinkled over the sausages or meat and used to suppress flames. The meat is usually marinated before grilling. Besides charcoal, sometimes gas and electric heat sources are used. Other methods are used less frequently.

Mexico

Carne asada chorizo
Mexican carne asada. Chorizos are also being grilled.

In Northern Mexico, carne asada (Spanish for "grilled meat") is a staple food. Popular cuts include arrachera, beefsteak and rib eye, as well as chorizo and chicken, among others. Charcoal, mesquite or firewood are used for the grilling.[9]

Argentina and Uruguay

In Argentina and Uruguay, both asado (beef roasted on a fire) and steak a la parrilla (beefsteak cooked on traditional grill) are staple dishes and even hailed as national specialties.

Sweden

In Sweden, grilling directly over hot coals is the most prominent form of grilling. Usually the meat is Boston butt, pork chops or pork fillet. It is also common to cook meat and vegetables together on a skewer, this is called "grillspett".

United Kingdom, Commonwealth and Ireland

In the United Kingdom, Commonwealth countries, and Ireland, grilling generally refers to cooking food directly under a source of direct, dry heat. The "grill" is usually a separate part of an oven where the food is inserted just under the element.[note 1] This practice is referred to as "broiling" in North America.[10] Sometimes the term grilling may refer to cooking with heat from below, as in the United States. In the 1970s and 1980s the electric, two sided vertical grill marketed by the Sunbeam company achieved cult status because of its quick, clean, and no added fat operation.

In electric ovens, grilling may be accomplished by placing the food near the upper heating element, with the lower heating element off and the oven door partially open. Grilling in an electric oven may create a large amount of smoke and cause splattering in the oven.[11] Both gas and electric ovens often have a separate compartment for grilling, such as a drawer below the flame or one of the stove top heating elements.

United States

In the United States, the use of the word grill refers to cooking food directly over a source of dry heat,[12] typically with the food sitting on a metal grate that leaves "grill marks." Grilling is usually done outdoors on charcoal grills or gas grills; a recent trend is the concept of infrared grilling.[13] Grilling may also be performed using stove-top "grill pans" which have raised metal ridges for the food to sit on, or using an indoor electric grill.

A skewer, brochette, or rotisserie may be used to cook small pieces of food. The resulting food product is often called a "kabob" (US term) or "kebab" which means "to grill" in Persian. Kebab is short for "shish kebab" (shish = skewer).

Mesquite or hickory wood chips (damp) may be added on top of the coals to create a smoldering effect that provides additional flavor to the food. Other hardwoods such as pecan, apple, maple and oak may also be used.

Health risks

As is true of any high-temperature frying or baking,[14] when meat is grilled at high temperatures, the cooking process can generate carcinogenic chemicals.[14][15] Two processes are thought to be responsible. Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are formed when amino acids, sugars, and creatine react at high temperatures.[14] Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed when fat and juices from meat grilled directly over an open fire drip onto the fire, causing flames. These flames contain PAHs that then adhere to the surface of the meat.[14]

However it is possible to significantly reduce carcinogens when grilling meat, or mitigate their effect. Garlic, rosemary, olive oil, cherries, and vitamin E have been shown to reduce formation of both HCAs and PAHs.[15] V-profiled grill elements placed at an angle may help drain much of the meat juices and dripping fat, and transport them away from the heat source. Heat sources on the top (as in many electrical or gas ovens), or on the side (vertical grilling) avoid completely the burning of fat dripping from the meat, and the meat's contact with the flames. Another method is precooking the meat in the microwave, which can reduce HCA formation by reducing the time that meat must be in contact with high heat to finish cooking.[14]

Methods

Gridironing

Grilling
Food cooking on a charcoal grill
Preparing grill for grilling, grill with flames and cones near Hostákov, Vladislav, Třebíč District
Preparation of a barbecue grill

Gridironing is the cooking of meats or other foods using a grill suspended above a heat source. Grilling is often performed outdoors using charcoal (real wood or preformed briquettes), wood, or propane gas. Food is cooked using direct radiant heat. Some outdoor grills include a cover so they can be used as smokers or for grill-roasting/barbecue. The suspended metal grate is often referred to as a gridiron.

Grilling chicken
Grilling chicken in a hinged gridiron

Outdoor grilling on a gridiron may be referred to as "barbecue", though in US usage, the term barbecue refers to the cooking of meat through indirect heat and smoke. Barbecue has several meanings and may be used to refer to the grilled food itself, to a distinct type of cooked meat called Southern barbecue, to the grilling device used to cook the food (a barbecue grill), or to the social event of cooking and eating such food (which may also be called a cook-out or braai).

Charcoal kettle-grilling

Charcoal kettle-grilling refers to the process of grilling over a charcoal fire in a kettle,[16][17][18] to the point that the edges are charred, or charred grill marks are visible.[19] Some restaurants seek to re-create the charcoal-grilled experience via the use of ceramic lava rocks or infrared heat sources,[20] offering meats that are cooked in this manner as "charcoal-cooked" or "charcoal-grilled".

Grill-baking

By using a baking sheet pan placed above the grill surface, as well as a drip pan below the surface, it is possible to combine grilling and roasting to cook meats that are stuffed or coated with breadcrumbs or batter, and to bake breads and even casseroles and desserts. When cooking stuffed or coated meats, the foods can be baked first on the sheet pan, and then placed directly on the grilling surface for char marks, effectively cooking twice; the drip pan will be used to capture any crumbs that fall off from the coating or stuffing.

Grill-braising

It is possible to braise meats and vegetables in a pot on top of a grill. A gas or electric grill would be the best choices for what is known as "barbecue-braising" or "grill-braising", or combining grilling directly on the surface and braising in a pot. To braise on a grill, put a pot on top of the grill, cover it, and let it simmer for a few hours. There are two advantages to barbecue-braising. The first is that this method allows for browning the meat directly on the grill before the braising, and the second is that it also allows for glazing the meat with sauce and finishing it directly over the fire after the braising, effectively cooking the meat three times, which results in a soft textured product that falls right off the bone.[21] This method of cooking is slower than regular grilling but faster than pit-smoking, starting out fast, slowing down, and then speeding up again to finish. If a pressure cooker is used, the cooking time will be much faster.

Indoor grilling

Many restaurants incorporate an indoor grill as part of their cooking apparatus. These grills resemble outdoor grills, in that they are made up of a grid suspended over a heat source. However, indoor grills are more likely to use electric or gas-based heating elements. Some manufacturers of residential cooking appliances now offer indoor grills for home use, either incorporated into a stove top or as a standalone electric device.[22]

Sear grilling

Sear-grill and gear grilling is a process of searing meat or food items with an infrared grill. In sear grilling, propane or natural gas is used to heat a ceramic plate, which then radiates heat at temperatures over 480 °C (900 °F).

Sear-grilling instantly sears the outside of meat to make the food more flavorful. Commonly, grilling heats the surrounding air to cook food. In this method, the infrared grill directly heats the food, not the air.

Stove-top pan grilling

Grillpanna
A grill pan

Stove-top pan grilling is an indoor cooking process that uses a grill pan — similar to a frying pan but with raised ridges to emulate the function or look of a gridiron. In pan grilling, heat is applied directly to the food by the raised ridges and indirectly through the heat radiating off the lower pan surface by the stove-top flame. Stove-top grill pans can be used to put sear marks on meat before it is finished by overhead radiant heat. When cooking leaner meats, oil is often applied to the pan ridges to aid in food release.[2]

Some griddles designed for stove-top use incorporate raised ridges in addition to a flat cooking area. These are either on half of the cooking surface or, in the case of reversible two-sided griddles, on one side with the flat surface on the other.

Flattop grilling

Seattle - Cooks at the Northern Lights Dining Room - 1952
Cooks at the Northern Lights Dining Room, Seattle, Washington, 1952. A flattop grill being used is located on the right.

Foods termed "grilled" may actually be prepared on a hot griddle or flat pan. The griddle or pan may be prepared with oil (or butter), and the food is cooked quickly over a high heat. Griddle-grilling is best for relatively greasy foods such as sausages. Some griddle-grilled foods may have grill marks applied to them during the cooking process with a branding plate, to mimic the appearance of charbroil-cooked food.

A flattop grill is a cooking appliance that resembles a griddle but performs differently because the heating element is circular rather than straight (side to side). This heating technology creates an extremely hot and even cooking surface, as heat spreads in a radial fashion over the surface.

The first flattop grills originated in Spain and are known as planchas or la plancha. Food that is cooked a la plancha means grilled on a metal plate. Plancha griddles or flat tops are chrome plated which prevents reaction with the food. Some base metal griddles will impart a subtle flavor to the food being cooked.

The flattop grill is a versatile platform for many cooking techniques such as sautéing, toasting, steaming, stir frying, grilling, baking, braising, and roasting, and can also be used in flambéing. In addition, pots and pans can be placed directly on the cooking surface for even more cooking flexibility. In most cases, the steel cooking surface is seasoned like cast iron cookware, providing a natural non-stick surface.

Charbroiling

Charbroiling, or chargrilling outside North America, refers to grilling on a surface with wide raised ridges, to the point of having the food slightly charred in texture.

Overhead grilling

In the United States, oven pan broiling refers to a method of cooking inside an oven on a broil pan with raised ridges, where the heat can be applied from either above or below. In gas and electric ovens, this is accomplished with a heating element and a broil pan. Sometimes, the food is placed near the upper heating element to intensify the heat. The lower heating element may or may not be left off and the oven door is sometimes opened partially. Gas ovens often have a separate compartment for broiling, sometimes a drawer below the bottom flame.

Salamander

Acosta-grill
Old electric grill with top heat (salamander)

A salamander (also salamander oven or salamander broiler) is a culinary grill characterized by very high temperature overhead electric or gas heating elements. It is used primarily in professional kitchens for overhead grilling. It is also used for toasting, browning of gratin dishes, melting cheeses onto sandwiches, and caramelizing desserts such as crème brûlée.

Salamanders are generally similar to an oven without a front door, with the heating elements at the top. They are more compact; typically only half the height and depth of a conventional oven. They are often wall mounted at eye level, enabling easy access and close control of the cooking process. Many salamanders can be fitted with a cast iron "branding" plate which is used to make grill marks on the surface of meat. Some grills can also be fitted with a rotisserie accessory for roasting meats.

Overhead heat has the advantage of allowing foods containing fats, such as steaks, chops and other cuts of meat, to be grilled without the risk of flare-ups caused by the rendered fat dripping onto the heat source. The salamander's facility for extremely high temperature also takes less cooking time than other grilling techniques, reducing preparation time, which is a benefit in professional kitchens during a busy meal service.

Modern salamanders take their name from the 18th century salamander, the tool of choice for toasting the top of a dish. It consisted of a thick plate of iron attached to the end of a long handle, with two feet, or rests, arranged near the iron plate for propping the plate over the food to be browned.[23] Its name in turn was taken from the legendary type of salamander, a mythical amphibian that was believed to be immune to fire.[24]

Two-sided grilling

Some commercial devices permit the simultaneous grilling of both sides of the meat at the same time.

The flame-grilling machine at Burger King, Carl's Jr./Hardee's, and other fast food restaurants is called a 'broiler'. It works by moving meat patties along a chain conveyor belt between top and bottom burners, grilling both sides of the meat patty at the same time. This concept was invented in 1898, when the Bridge and Beach Co. of St. Louis, Missouri, started manufacturing a vertical cast iron stove. These stoves were designed to allow the meat to be flame-broiled (flame-grilled) on both sides at the same time. Custom hinged steel wire gridirons were built for use in the vertical broilers. The hinged gridirons were slid in and out of the stoves holding the meat while it cooked evenly on both sides, like modern day oven racks. These stoves took up a small amount of counter space. They were used in lunch spots to feed factory workers.[25]

During the 1990s, double-sided grilling was popular in the USA using consumer electrical grills (e.g., the popular George Foreman Grill). US marketers of electric double-sided grilling appliances opted for the global term 'grilling' rather than the geographically isolated term "broiler." Hinged double-sided grills are generically known as contact grills.

Whole grilling

Whole grilling involves grilling a whole carcass as opposed to grilling individual portion sized cuts. This method is often used in order to avoid the need for complicated grill equipment during, for example, a hunt or expedition in the wild. It is also the traditional method of cooking in several cultures where they do a pig roast, luau, or barbacoa. There are several primitive methods and modern equipment that copies and automates the primitive version:

  • On a stick
    • Rotating horizontally with heat from tall flames from usually two fires on the side:[26] In this version, which essentially is one sided vertical grilling, it is usual to spice the inside and sew the entrance of the body enclosure using freshly cut sticks in order to save the juices, rotate back and forth (never seam line at bottom), harvest the juice at the end of grilling, and use it as a spicy sauce over the outside surface.
    • Rotating horizontally over embers: In this version the meat may be subject to smoke from dripping fat that burns.
    • Planted in a heated and covered pit: a ground hole version of tandoori or oven. A covered pit makes it difficult to check the correct amount of cooking time.
  • Asado on a vertical frame planted vertically and leaned over embers: In this version it is usual to open the torso to avoid uncooked portions.
  • Hang in a heated and covered pit (requires stick across the pit opening, and a heat-resistant hanging mechanism such as a metal S hook)
  • On a tray in a large oven, heated and covered pit, barbeque grill or smoker
  • In a fireproof closed container buried in embers or surrounded by fire: this is practical for small carcasses like whole chicken. One variation of this is to shallowly bury the food and make a fire over, just to dig it up again; This is suitable to whole grill a large pumpkin that has been opened from the top, seeds removed, the inside sugared, and closed again.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ See wikibooks:Cookbook:Grilling.

References

  1. ^ "Heat in Cooking - University of Kentucky" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-11-13. Retrieved 2016-11-12.
  2. ^ a b "Grilling: Information from". Answers.com. 2007-04-15. Archived from the original on 2014-12-27. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  3. ^ "broiling: Information from". Answers.com. Archived from the original on 2014-12-27. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  4. ^ Schröder, Monika J.A. (2003). Food Quality and Consumer Value: Delivering Food that Satisfies. Berlin: Springer. p. 150. ISBN 3540439145. Archived from the original on 11 June 2016. Retrieved 10 February 2017.
  5. ^ Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Nagao, Minako (April 2004). "Heterocyclic amines: Mutagens/carcinogens produced during cooking of meat and fish". Cancer Science. 95 (4): 290–299. doi:10.1111/j.1349-7006.2004.tb03205.x. Archived from the original on 19 June 2010. Retrieved 1 February 2015.
  6. ^ "Chemicals in Meat Cooked at High Temperatures and Cancer Risk - National Cancer Institute". Cancer.gov. Archived from the original on 2010-12-21. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  7. ^ "Health | Marinating 'may cut cancer risk'". BBC News. 2008-12-30. Archived from the original on 2008-12-31. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  8. ^ Beckett, Fiona (2012). Sausage & Mash. London: Bloomsbury Publishing. p. 16. ISBN 9781408187760. Retrieved 10 February 2017.
  9. ^ "Weekends have a carne asada smell to them". Mexico News Network. Retrieved 12 July 2018.
  10. ^ "Broil/Grill". languagehat.com. 2005-10-12. Archived from the original on 2017-03-15. Retrieved 2017-03-14.
  11. ^ "In a kitchen oven, what is the difference between the bake setti - HowStuffWorks". Home.howstuffworks.com. 2000-04-01. Archived from the original on 2008-08-21. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  12. ^ "License to Grill", Schlesinger and Willoughby, William Morrow and Co. 1997
  13. ^ "Consumers Warm to Infrared Grilling | Home Tech | TechNewsWorld". www.technewsworld.com. Archived from the original on 2016-09-14. Retrieved 2016-07-12.
  14. ^ a b c d e "Chemicals in Meat Cooked at High Temperatures and Cancer Risk — National Cancer Institute". Cancer.gov. Archived from the original on 2011-11-06. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  15. ^ a b Wong, Cathy (2014-12-12). "5 Tips That May Help Reduce Carcinogens in Cooked Meat". Altmedicine.about.com. Archived from the original on 2015-02-01. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  16. ^ "Charbroiling - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary". Merriam-webster.com. Archived from the original on 2015-02-01. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  17. ^ "char-grilled - definition of char-grilled by The Free Dictionary". Thefreedictionary.com. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  18. ^ "grilling Press Releases, Trade Shows, Jobs, Company Info". Grilling.75364.free-press-release.com. Archived from the original on 2014-01-18. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  19. ^ "The Health of It All : Char Grilling or Broiling Meat". Drgourmet.com. Archived from the original on 2015-02-01. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  20. ^ "Restaurant Equipment Buying Guides". ShortOrder.com. Archived from the original on 2009-08-08. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  21. ^ "A New Way to Grill: Barbecue-Braising". Finecooking.com. Archived from the original on 2015-02-01. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  22. ^ Riches, Derrick. "Indoor Grilling - When Outside Just Isn't an Option". Bbq.about.com. Archived from the original on 2015-02-01. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  23. ^ "Feeding America". Digital.lib.msu.edu. Archived from the original on 2010-02-13. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  24. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, s.v. 'salamander'
  25. ^ "Broiler" (PDF). Freepatentsonline.com. Retrieved 2015-02-01.
  26. ^ "Boyabat'ta Sırık Kebabı". YouTube. 2015-11-11. Retrieved 2018-08-22.

Further reading

  • Elliott, Richard Smith (1883). Notes Taken In Sixty Years. R. P. Studley & Co.
  • Riccio, Anthony V. (2006). The Italian Experience In New Haven : Images And Oral Histories. SUNY Press. ISBN 0-7914-6773-2.
  • Romaine, Lawrence B. (1990). A Guide To American Trade Catalogs 1744-1900. Courier Dover Publications. ISBN 0-486-26475-0.
BBQ with Bobby Flay

BBQ with Bobby Flay is a travelogue series, in which celebrity chef and restaurateur Bobby Flay travels around the USA in search of the best and most delectable grilled barbecued food. The chef tours from one city to the other, visiting local grills, barbecue joints and cook-offs and meeting the grilling experts to explore the savory flavors, the cooking styles and the amazing grilling gadgetries that go into creating a smoking palate of grilled barbecued meal.

Barbecue

Barbecue or barbeque (informally BBQ or the Australian term barbie) is a cooking method, a style of food, and a name for a meal or gathering at which this style of food is cooked and served.

Barbecue can refer to the cooking method itself, the meat cooked this way, the cooking apparatus/machine used (the "barbecue grill" or simply "barbecue"), or to a type of social event featuring this type of cooking. Barbecuing is usually done outdoors by smoking the meat over wood or charcoal. Restaurant barbecue may be cooked in large, specially-designed brick or metal ovens. Barbecue is practiced in many areas of the world and there are numerous regional variations.

Barbecuing techniques include smoking, roasting or baking, braising and grilling. The technique for which it is named involves cooking using smoke at low temperatures and long cooking times (several hours). Baking uses an oven to convection cook with moderate temperatures for an average cooking time of about an hour. Braising combines direct, dry heat charbroiling on a ribbed surface with a broth-filled pot for moist heat. Grilling is done over direct, dry heat, usually over a hot fire for a few minutes.

Barbecue grill

A barbecue grill is a device that cooks food by applying heat from below. There are several varieties of grills, with most falling into one of two categories: gas-fueled or charcoal. There is debate over which method yields superior results.

Barbecue in North Carolina

Barbecue is an important part of the heritage and history of the U.S. state of North Carolina. It has resulted in a series of bills and laws that relate to the subject, and at times has been a politically charged subject. In part, this is due to the existence of two distinct types of barbecue that have developed over the last few hundred years: Lexington style and Eastern style. Both are pork-based barbecues but differ in the cuts of pork used and the sauces they are served with. In addition to the two native varieties, other styles of barbecue can be found throughout the state.

Barbecue sauce

Barbecue sauce (also abbreviated as BBQ sauce) is used as a flavoring sauce, a marinade, basting, condiment, or topping for meat cooked in the barbecue cooking style, including pork or beef ribs and chicken. It is a ubiquitous condiment in the Southern United States and is used on many other foods as well.The ingredients vary widely even within individual countries, but most include some variation on vinegar, tomato paste, or mayonnaise (or a combination thereof) as a base, as well as liquid smoke, onion powder, spices such as mustard and black pepper, and sweeteners such as sugar or molasses.

Charbroiler

A charbroiler (also referred to as a chargrill, char-broiler or simply broiler) is a commonly used cooking device consisting of a series of grates or ribs that can be heated using a variety of means, and is used in both residential and commercial applications for a variety of cooking operations. The heat source is almost always beneath the cooking surface – for gas-fired applications this is referred to as an under-fired broiler. Most commonly the charbroiler is a series of long evenly spaced metal ribs over a large combustion chamber filled with an array of burners that may have a deflector, briquettes or radiant between the burner and the cooking surface.

The term charbroiler is usually associated with commercial kitchen applications, though the construction and cooking process is similar to light-duty residential products referred to as grills. The terms charbroiling, broiling, grilling and char-grilling are often used interchangeably, though depending on the application and equipment involved there may be differences in how the food product is actually cooked. The Culinary Reference Guide identifies grilling as "the process used when an item is cooked on a grated surface to sear in the flavors and impart a degree of charring which gives the product a light charcoal smoke flavor."

Cheese sandwich

A cheese sandwich is a basic sandwich generally made with one or more varieties of cheese on any sort of bread, such as flat bread or wheat bread, that may include spreads such as butter or mayonnaise. A typical grilled cheese sandwich is made by grilling the sandwich with butter or margarine and toasting it.

Galbi

Galbi (갈비), galbi-gui (갈비구이), or grilled ribs is a type of gui (grilled dish) in Korean cuisine. "Galbi" is the Korean word for "rib", and the dish is usually made with beef short ribs. When pork spareribs or another meat is used instead, the dish is named accordingly. Galbi is served raw, then cooked on tabletop grills usually by the diners themselves. The dish may be marinated in a sweet and savory sauce usually containing soy sauce, garlic, and sugar. Both non-marinated and marinated galbi are often featured in Korean barbecue.

George Foreman Grill

The George Foreman Lean Mean Fat-Reducing Grilling Machine, commonly known as the George Foreman Grill, is a portable electrically heated grill manufactured by Spectrum Brands. It is promoted by former boxing champion George Foreman. Since its introduction in 1994, over 100 million George Foreman grills have been sold worldwide.

Gridiron (cooking)

A gridiron is a metal grate with parallel bars typically used for grilling meat, fish, vegetables, or combinations of such foods. It may also be two such grids, hinged to fold together, to hold food securely while grilling over an open flame.

Indirect grilling

Indirect grilling is a barbecue cooking technique in which the food is placed to the side of or above the heat source instead of directly over the flame as is more common. This can be achieved by igniting only some burners on a gas barbecue or by piling coals to one side of a charcoal pit. A drip tray is placed below the food to prevent fat from the food igniting and generating a direct flame. Indirect grilling is designed to cook larger (e.g. pork shoulders, whole chicken) or tougher foods (e.g. brisket, ribs) that would burn if cooked using a direct flame. This method of cooking generates a more moderate temperature (about 275–350 °F) and allows for an easier introduction of wood smoke for flavoring.While placing the food to one side of the fire places the food further from the heat source and thus reduces the intensity of the radiation, the food is still exposed to direct radiation from the fire. Other variations of indirect grilling place a physical barrier between the food and the fire. One method is to place a plank or an unperforated tray on the grill as a base upon which to cook. If the plank is made from wood and is soaked before grilling, the wood can then be used to impart flavor to the food. Another method of indirect grilling is to place a physical barrier such as a pizza stone between the fire and the food. The heat rises from the fire around the edges of the barrier and then circulates around the food. Most brands of kamado style outdoor cookers have accessories known as heat deflectors which can be placed above the fire and below the food grate.

In the 1990s it became popular to stand a chicken on an open can of beer or other canned beverage inserted into the cavity when indirect grilling, a preparation known as "beer can chicken". Some believe that the contents of the can boil and flavor the food with the consequent vapor, however rigorous tests have invoked skepticism on this point.

Linagpang

Linagpang or nilagpang, is a Filipino cooking process that originates from the Western Visayas. It involves first char-grilling, roasting, or broiling chicken or fish and then adding them to a soup with tomatoes, onions, scallions, and ginger.

List of barbecue restaurants

This is a list of notable barbecue restaurants. Barbecue is a method and apparatus for char grilling food in the hot smoke of a wood fire, usually charcoal fueled. In the United States, to grill is to cook in this manner quickly, while barbecue is typically a much slower method utilizing less heat than grilling, attended to over an extended period of several hours. The term as a noun can refer to the meat, the cooking apparatus itself (the "barbecue grill" or simply "barbecue") or to the party that includes such food or such preparation methods. The term as an adjective can refer to foods cooked by this method. The term is also used as a verb for the act of cooking food in this manner. Barbecue has numerous regional variations in many parts of the world.

Mangal (barbecue)

Mangal (Arabic: منقل‎, translit. manqal, Kurdish; مقەڵی, Turkish: mangal, Persian: منقل‎, translit. manghal, Urdu: منقل‎, translit. manghal, Hebrew: מנגל‎, translit. mangal, Georgian: მაყალი, Armenian: մանղալ, translit. manghal, Azerbaijani: manqal, Russian: мангал) is a Middle Eastern barbecue; both the event and the grilling apparatus itself.

Pork ribs

Pork ribs are a cut of pork popular in Western and Asian cuisines. The ribcage of a domestic pig, meat and bones together, is cut into usable pieces, prepared by smoking, grilling, or baking – usually with a sauce, often barbecue – and then served.

Sandpoint, Idaho

Sandpoint is the largest town in, and the county seat of, Bonner County, Idaho, United States. Its population was 7,365 at the 2010 census.

Sandpoint's major economic contributors include forest products, light manufacturing, tourism, recreation and government services. As the largest service center in the two northern Idaho counties (Bonner and Boundary), as well as northwestern Montana, it has an active retail sector. It is the headquarters of Wildwood Grilling, a manufacturer of Cedar grilling planks and other wood smoking products; it is the headquarters of Litehouse Foods, a national salad dressing manufacturer; and Quest Aircraft, a maker of utility aircraft.

Sandpoint lies on the shores of Idaho's largest lake, 43-mile-long Lake Pend Oreille, and is surrounded by three major mountain ranges, the Selkirk, Cabinet and Bitterroot ranges. It is home to Schweitzer Mountain Resort, Idaho's largest ski resort, and is on the International Selkirk Loop and two National Scenic Byways (Wild Horse Trail and Pend Oreille Scenic Byway). Among other distinctions awarded by national media in the past decade, in 2011 Sandpoint was named the nation's "Most Beautiful Small Town" by Rand McNally and USA Today.

Searing

Searing (or pan searing) is a technique used in grilling, baking, braising, roasting, sautéing, etc., in which the surface of the food (usually meat, poultry or fish) is cooked at high temperature until a browned crust forms. Similar techniques, browning and blackening, are typically used to sear all sides of a particular piece of meat, fish, poultry, etc. before finishing it in the oven. To obtain the desired brown or black crust, the meat surface must exceed 150 °C (300 °F), so searing requires the meat surface be free of water, which boils at around 100 °C (212 °F).

Although often said to "lock in the moisture" or "seal in the juices", searing has been demonstrated to result in a greater net loss of moisture versus cooking to the same internal temperature without first searing. Nonetheless, it remains an essential technique in cooking meat for several reasons:

The browning creates desirable flavors through the Maillard reaction.

The appearance of the food is usually improved with a well-browned crust.

The contrast in taste and texture between the crust and the interior makes the food more interesting to the palate.A common misnomer linked with searing meat is caramelization. Caramelization is a process that affects sugars, or simple carbohydrates. Whereas the Maillard reaction refers to the heating of amino acids.

Typically in grilling, the food will be seared over very high heat and then moved to a lower-temperature area of the grill to finish cooking. In braising, the seared surface acts to flavor, color and otherwise enrich the liquid in which the food is being cooked.

Tailgate party

A tailgate party is a social event held on and around the open tailgate of a vehicle. Tailgating, which originated in the United States, often involves consuming alcoholic beverages and grilling food. Tailgate parties occur in the parking lots at stadiums and arenas, before and occasionally after games and concerts. People attending such a party are said to be 'tailgating'. Many people participate even if their vehicles do not have tailgates. Tailgate parties also involve people bringing their own alcoholic beverages, barbecues, food etc. which is sampled and shared among fans attending the tailgate. Tailgates are intended to be non-commercial events, so selling items to the fans is frowned upon.

Tailgate parties have spread to the pre-game festivities at sporting events besides football, such as basketball, hockey, soccer, and baseball, and also occur at non-sporting events such as weddings, barbecues, and concerts.

Tare sauce

Tare (垂れ, [taɾe]) is a general term in Japanese cuisine for dipping sauces often used in grilling (yakitori and yakiniku, especially as teriyaki sauce) as well as with sushi, nabemono and gyoza. The sauce is best described as sweetened, thickened soy sauce for grilling and flavored soy sauce with dashi, vinegar, etc., for nabemono and natto such as ponzu but every chef has their own variation. Kuromitsu is sweet tare.

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