Greg Swindell

Forest Gregory "Greg" Swindell (born January 2, 1965) is an American former Major League Baseball player, who had a 17-year career as a left-handed pitcher from 1986 to 2002. He played for the Cleveland Indians, Minnesota Twins and Boston Red Sox of the American League and the Cincinnati Reds, Houston Astros and Arizona Diamondbacks of the National League. With the Diamondbacks, he won the 2001 World Series against the New York Yankees.

Greg Swindell
Pitcher
Born: January 2, 1965 (age 54)
Fort Worth, Texas
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
August 21, 1986, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
September 23, 2002, for the Arizona Diamondbacks
MLB statistics
Win–loss record123–122
Earned run average3.86
Strikeouts1,542
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early and personal life

Swindell was born on January 2, 1965, to Tonii and Harold Swindell in Fort Worth, Texas. He was the youngest of four children, two sisters Treva and Chrystie and a brother Corky

He graduated from Sharpstown High School in 1983. The previous year, led his high school team to a Texas Class 5A state championship going 14-0 on the mound with a 0.65 ERA

Swindell and his wife Sarah have four children; three daughters, Hayley, Brenna and Sophia and a son, Dawson, who was diagnosed with autism.

Collegiate career

Swindell attended the University of Texas at Austin. According to the Texas Longhorns media guide, he was one of the most decorated pitchers in school history, with a 43-8 record in 77 games and a 1.92 ERA. He made 50 starts, pitching 32 complete games and notching school records for shutouts (14) and strikeouts (501). He remains among the top 10 all-time in Longhorns history for ERA (10th), victories (3rd), innings (2nd), strikeouts (1st), appearances (4th), starts (3rd), complete games (3rd) and shutouts (1st). Swindell also had 13 career saves, which ranks sixth at UT and the top two single-season strikeout totals in UT history (204 in 1985 and 180 in 1986). During his tenure, he helped UT capture three straight Southwest Conference titles, post at least 51 wins during each of his three seasons and finish second at the College World Series in 1984 and 1985.

In 1985, he had a 19-2 record and 1.67 ERA to go along with 15 complete games, six shutouts and 204 strikeouts over 172 innings. He was named as the 1985 Baseball America National Player of the Year. He was selected a first-team All-American and All-Southwest Conference performer all three seasons and received Freshman All-America honors as well as Baseball America's Freshman of the Year Award in 1984. He also was a three time finalist for the Golden Spikes Award.

Professional career

Cleveland selected him in the first round of the 1986 draft. The highly touted player was brought up almost immediately in 1986 and had moderate success. In 1987 he started the season 3-8 and then injured his elbow.

He returned in 1988 and over the next four years displayed good form on a poor-performing Indians ballclub. His record from 1988-1991 was 52-43, posting an earned run average below 4.00 in three of the four seasons. His best season was 1988 when he went 18-14 with a 3.20 ERA. He struck out 180 and walked only 45. The next year, he was named to the American League All-Star team.

Swindell was traded to Cincinnati after the 1991 season and spent one year with the Reds. He returned to his native Texas as a free agent in 1992 with the Astros. At that point, his effectiveness began to wane. In three and a half years, he was 30-35 with an ERA over 4.00. After another stint with Cleveland in 1996, he signed with Minnesota where he reinvented himself as a reliever.

As a relief pitcher, Swindell pitched well for the Twins and Red Sox before he signed with Arizona.[1] He was effective for the Diamondbacks and was a part of the 2001 championship squad. In 2002, he retired from baseball after 17 seasons.

Post-playing career

In 2004, Swindell was a volunteer assistant coach at Texas State University–San Marcos. In 2005, he returned to coach his alma mater, Texas Longhorns baseball, helping the team win its sixth NCAA College World Series crown.[2]

In 2007 and 2008, Swindell served a second stint on the Texas Longhorns coaching staff, as the first base coach and helping with the pitchers.

Swindell was inducted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame in the class of 2008.[3]

During the 2009 Major League Baseball season, Swindell worked as a post-game analyst on Fox Sports Arizona following Arizona Diamondbacks telecast. In 2010, he has been on Thursday morning "Talk Baseball" segments on 1300 the zone (KVET-AM).[4]

In 2011, Swindell served as the Color commentator for the Little League Southwest Region tournament along with Justin Kutcher.

Greg, since 2011 is an analyst for Texas Longhorn Baseball, working with Longhorn Network, alongside Play-by-play man Keith Moreland. He also works Longhorn Gameday with Lowell Galindo and studio work as well.

References

  1. ^ "D-backs sign Swindell to $5.7 million, 3-year deal". Kingman Daily Miner. AP. 12 November 1998. p. 7A.
  2. ^ Coaching Profile texassports.com (accessed August 17, 2010)
  3. ^ Third College Baseball Hall of Fame Class Announced Archived 2010-10-24 at the Wayback Machine collegebaseballfoundation.org, December 18, 2009 (accessed August 17, 2010)
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-10-17. Retrieved 2010-08-18.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

1984 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1984 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

1984 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1984 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1984 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its thirty eighth year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Six regions held a four team, double-elimination tournament while two regions included six teams, resulting in 36 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The thirty-eighth tournament's champion was Cal State Fullerton, coached by Augie Garrido. The Most Outstanding Player was John Fishel of Cal State Fullerton.

1985 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1985 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

1986 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1986 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

1986 Major League Baseball draft

The 1986 Major League Baseball Draft was the 22nd MLB draft that took place in 1986. During this draft 21 future all-stars were drafted including, Greg Swindell, Matt Williams, Kevin Brown, Gary Sheffield, Roberto Hernández, Jack Armstrong, Dean Palmer, Scott Cooper, Kent Bottenfield, Bo Jackson, Joe Girardi, Pat Hentgen, Tom Gordon, Steve Finley, Rod Beck, Chuck Knoblauch, Rick Reed, Paul Quantrill, John Olerud, Scott Erickson and Todd Jones.

1988 Cleveland Indians season

The 1988 Cleveland Indians season was the 88th season for the franchise. The team, managed by Doc Edwards, finished sixth in the American League East.

Despite its mediocre season, the team had a significant legacy in Major League Baseball in the 21st century. Twenty-five years later, five of the 30 MLB managers at the start of the 2013 season were alumni of the 1988 Indians:

Bud Black, pitcher – San Diego Padres

Terry Francona, first baseman/outfielder – Cleveland Indians

John Farrell, pitcher – Boston Red Sox

Charlie Manuel, hitting coach – Philadelphia Phillies

Ron Washington, utility infielder – Texas RangersThe team also had players who became MLB Broadcasters, coaches, and front office executives:

Scott Bailes, pitcher- fill-in broadcaster for the Cleveland Indians

Tom Candiotti, pitcher- radio color analyst for the Arizona Diamondbacks

Rod Nichols, pitcher- former Philadelphia Phillies bullpen coach, current Iowa Cubs pitching coach

Rick Rodriguez, pitcher- former Oakland Athletics bullpen coach, current Sacramento River Cats

Greg Swindell, pitcher- former Arizona Diamondbacks pregame and postgame analyst. In 2011, Swindell served as the Color commentator for the Little League Southwest Region tournament

Chris Bando, catcher- former Milwaukee Brewers bench and 3rd base coach from 1996–1998

Jay Bell, infielder- former Arizona Diamondbacks bench and hitting coach, former Pittsburgh Pirates hitting coach, former Cincinnati Reds bench coach

Brook Jacoby, infielder- former Cincinnati Reds hitting coach and current Toronto Blue Jays hitting coach

Willie Upshaw, infielder- former San Francisco Giants 1st base coach

Joe Carter, outfielder- former Toronto Blue Jays and Chicago Cubs TV analyst

Dave Clark, outfielder- former Pittsburgh Pirates hitting coach, former Houston Astros interim manager, 3rd base coach, and 1st base coach, and currently the Detroit Tigers third base coach

Cory Snyder, outfielder- hitting coach for the Jackson Generals, a Double-A affiliate of the Seattle Mariners

Pat Tabler, outfielder- Toronto Blue Jays TV color analyst

Rod Allen, outfielder- former Arizona Diamondbacks broadcaster, current Detroit Tigers television analyst

Dan Firova, catcher- current Washington Nationals bullpen coach

Doug Jones, closer- current pitching coach of the Boise Hawks, the short-season A affiliate of the Colorado Rockies

1989 Cleveland Indians season

The 1989 Cleveland Indians season was their 89th season in the American League. For the 3rd consecutive season, the Indians had a losing record. The Indians had at least 73 wins for the 2nd consecutive season.

1990 Detroit Tigers season

The 1990 Detroit Tigers season was the 90th season in franchise history. The Tigers finished in third place in the American League East, with a record of 79-83. They scored 750 runs and allowed 754. Notably, Cecil Fielder reached the 50 Home Run plateau, the first and last Detroit Tiger to hit at least 50 home runs since Hank Greenberg in 1938.

1991 Cleveland Indians season

The Cleveland Indians lost 105 games in 1991, the most in franchise history.

1992 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1992 Cincinnati Reds season saw the Reds finish in second place in the National League West with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses.

This was the final season in which the Reds donned the pullover jersey and beltless pants uniform style (the Reds being the last MLB team still wearing them). Following this season they switched back to a traditional baseball uniform.

1992 Cleveland Indians season

The Indians were named "Organization of the Year" by Baseball America in 1992, in response to the appearance of offensive bright spots and an improving farm system.

1993 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1993 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Houston Astros attempting to win the National League West.

1997 Minnesota Twins season

The 1997 Minnesota Twins will not be remembered as the strongest team the Twins ever fielded. Manager Tom Kelly's team consisted of a few solid players, but mainly past-their-prime veterans and never-to-be-established prospects. One of the few bright spots was pitcher Brad Radke's breakout season, in which he won 20 games, at one point had 12 consecutive victories, tying a record Scott Erickson set in 1991. The team finished with a 68-94 record, good enough for fourth place in what proved to be the league's weakest division that season. The Cleveland Indians, who won the division that year, made it all the way to the World Series, but lost in seven games to the Florida Marlins.

1998 Boston Red Sox season

The 1998 Boston Red Sox season was the 98th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses, 22 games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox qualified for the postseason as the AL wild card, but lost to the American League Central champion Cleveland Indians in the ALDS.

1998 Minnesota Twins season

Like many Twins teams of its half-decade, the 1998 Minnesota Twins neither impressed nor contended. The team finished with a 70-92 record, with subpar batting and pitching. The season was not without its bright spots, as individual players had solid seasons and Hall of Fame designated hitter Paul Molitor announced his retirement at the end of the season. Tom Kelly's team had plenty of lowlights, most notably David Wells' perfect game against the team on May 17 at Yankee Stadium.

1999 Arizona Diamondbacks season

The 1999 Arizona Diamondbacks looked to improve on their 1998 expansion season. They looked to contend in what was a strong National League West Division. They finished the season with a highly surprising record of 100-62, good enough for the NL West division title. In the NLDS, however, they fell in four games to the New York Mets on Todd Pratt's infamous home run. Randy Johnson would win the NL Cy Young Award and become the third pitcher to win the Cy Young Award in both leagues.

Texas Longhorns baseball

The Texas Longhorns baseball team represents The University of Texas at Austin in NCAA Division I intercollegiate men's baseball competition. The Longhorns currently compete in the Big 12 Conference.

The University of Texas began varsity intercollegiate competition in baseball in 1894. Texas is the winningest NCAA Division I college baseball program in terms of win percentage, with an all-time win-loss record of 3558–1323–32 (.727). The Longhorns rank second in all-time wins as of June 11, 2018, behind the Fordham Rams. As of the end of the 2018 conference season, Texas has won 78 regular season conference championships and 16 conference tournament championships in baseball.The Longhorns have won six NCAA baseball national championships (1949, 1950, 1975, 1983, 2002, and 2005) — second to Southern California's total of 12 — and have been the runner-up in the College World Series (CWS) Championship Games on six other occasions (1953, 1984, 1985, 1989, 2004, and 2009). Texas holds the records for most appearances in the College World Series (36), most individual CWS games won (85), most overall NCAA Tournament games won (240), and most NCAA Tournament appearances (59); the second-place programs in these categories have 25 CWS appearances (Miami), wins in 74 CWS games (Southern California), 192 overall NCAA Tournament wins (Florida State and Miami), and 56 NCAA Tournament appearances (Florida State), as of June 11, 2018.

Former Longhorns who have gone on to success in Major League Baseball include Roger Clemens, Calvin Schiraldi, Burt Hooton, Keith Moreland, Spike Owen, Mark Petkovsek, Greg Swindell, Brandon Belt, and Huston Street.

From 1997 to 2016, the Longhorns were led by head coach Augie Garrido, who holds the record for most wins in NCAA baseball history. The team is currently led by third-year head coach David Pierce. Texas plays its home games at UFCU-Disch-Falk Field.

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Coaches
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(pre-1947 era)

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