Greg Schiano

Gregory Edward Schiano (born June 1, 1966) is an American football coach. He is the former associate head coach and defensive coordinator of the Ohio State Buckeyes college football team. He served as the head football coach at Rutgers University from 2001 to 2011 and as head coach of the National Football League's Tampa Bay Buccaneers from 2012 to 2013.

Greg Schiano
Potograph of Schiano interacting with a player during pre-game warmups
Schiano (left) during his tenure as Rutgers head coach in 2006
Biographical details
BornJune 1, 1966 (age 52)
Wyckoff, New Jersey
Playing career
1985–1987Bucknell
Position(s)Linebacker
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1988Ramapo HS (NJ) (assistant)
1989Rutgers (GA)
1990Penn State (GA)
1991–1995Penn State (DB)
1996–1997Chicago Bears (defensive assistant)
1998Chicago Bears (DB)
1999–2000Miami (FL) (DC)
2001–2011Rutgers
2012–2013Tampa Bay Buccaneers
2016–2018Ohio State (associate HC / DC)
Head coaching record
Overall68–67 (college)
11–21 (NFL)
Bowls5–1
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year (2006)
George Munger Award (2006)
Home Depot Coach of the Year (2006)
Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year (2006)
Walter Camp Coach of the Year (2006)
Big East Coach of the Year (2006)

Early life and education

Schiano was born and grew up in Wyckoff, New Jersey, and attended Ramapo High School. He then attended Bucknell University,[1] where he was a member of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity, and graduated in 1988 with a B.S. in business administration. Despite being a 190-pound linebacker in high school, Bucknell assistant Joe Susan felt he was a perfect fit for the defense. Susan would later join Schiano at Rutgers.[2]

Playing career

Playing at linebacker, Schiano was a three-year letterman at Bucknell. In his junior year, he led the team with 114 tackles and was named to the All-Conference team. In his senior year, he was named team captain, and was named to The Sporting News Pre-season All-American Team.

Coaching career

Schiano began his coaching career in 1988 as an assistant coach at Ramapo High School for the Raiders football team. In 1989, he served as a graduate assistant at Rutgers. In 1990, he took the same position at Penn State, and later served as the defensive backfield coach there from 1991 until 1995. From 1996 to 1998, Schiano was an assistant coach in the NFL with the Chicago Bears.[3] For his first two seasons there, he was a defensive assistant, and then was promoted in his third and final season with the Bears to defensive backfield coach.

University of Miami

Schiano served as defensive coordinator for the University of Miami from 1999 to 2000. In 1999, Miami finished the year ranked 12th in the NCAA's Division I-A in points allowed per game (17.2), and in 2000 moved up to 5th (15.5 points allowed per game). His brief 18-month stint at Miami and his roots in New Jersey made him a candidate for his next position as head coach at Rutgers University.

While at the University of Miami, Schiano coached NFL Pro Bowlers Dan Morgan, Jonathan Vilma, and Ed Reed.

Rutgers

On December 1, 2000, Schiano accepted the head coaching position at Rutgers,[4] the state university of New Jersey. He was given the task of turning around a struggling program that had been without a bowl game appearance since the 1978 Garden State Bowl, and had just four winning seasons since 1980. Although Schiano was producing solid recruiting classes, especially by Rutgers standards, the Scarlet Knights struggled to mediocre records in his first four seasons as head coach.

Despite the rough start to his tenure at Rutgers, Schiano began to turn around for the program during the 2005 season. Schiano recruited New York native Ray Rice, who was considered the top running back in the Tri-State area. He coached Rutgers to a 7–4 record that season. The highlight of their season came in a nationally televised 37–29 upset win over Pittsburgh and their coach Dave Wannstedt, a long-time friend of Schiano's, who hired him while coaching the Chicago Bears. At season's end, Schiano and the Scarlet Knights accepted a bid to play in the Insight Bowl against Arizona State University, which Rutgers lost by a score of 45-40. Just prior to the game, Schiano was offered a new contract, extending his contract through the 2012 season. The 2005 season laid the foundation for a rebirth of the Rutgers football program.

In the 2006 season, Schiano's Scarlet Knights raced off to a 9-0 record, highlighted by their November 9 victory over the third-ranked, undefeated Louisville Cardinals. After this game, Rutgers jumped to seventh in the national AP Poll, which was their highest ranking in school history and first Top 25 ranking since 1976.[5] The euphoria from the win and high ranking quickly faded the following week with a loss to Cincinnati, but the Scarlet Knights bounced back to finish 11-2 and qualify for the inaugural Texas Bowl.[6] There, they would defeat the Kansas State Wildcats 37–10, capturing their first ever bowl game win in school history.

Throughout the season, coach Schiano and Rutgers were featured prominently in both the local and national media, and Schiano's motivational phrase "keep choppin'" became part of the lexicon of college football. Rutgers finished the season ranked 12th in the national poll, their best finish in school history. For his work in the 2006 season, Coach Schiano was awarded several Coach of the Year honors, including the Home Depot Coach of the Year award and the inaugural Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year Award. In just six years at the helm, coach Schiano had unquestionably turned around the fortunes of Rutgers football and established the team as one of the top football programs in the country.[7]

With high expectations after their "Cinderella" season, Schiano coached Rutgers to respectable finishes and three more bowl game victories to give them four in a row. Schiano's team experienced tragedy in 2010, when defensive tackle Eric LeGrand suffered a spinal cord injury.[8] This clearly affected the team's play: when the extent of LeGrand's injury became apparent, it contributed to sending Rutgers into a funk that resulted in a six-game losing streak to end the season.

Schiano has been credited for his involvement in LeGrand's recovery, essentially treating LeGrand's family like his own and assisting the family in any way needed,[9] and being with LeGrand every day he was in the hospital.[10] Though LeGrand was initially given a diagnosis of lifetime paralysis, he has since regained movement in his arms and shoulders and sensation throughout his body.

In 2011, Rutgers rebounded from the previous season to post a 9-4 record and once again earn a bowl game berth. In the Pinstripe Bowl, they defeated Iowa State 27–13, which would be his final game as Rutgers coach. He led the team to winning seasons and bowl game berths in six of his final seven seasons, with wins in the final five bowl games.

Current NFL players who played under Schiano at Rutgers:

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

On January 26, 2012, Schiano accepted his first head coaching opportunity at the professional-football level, with the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[11] The Buccaneers ended the 2012 regular season with a 7–9 record, missing the playoffs in the process. In the 2013–2014 season, the team regressed to 4–12.

On December 30, 2013, the Buccaneers fired Schiano along with Mark Dominik, the general manager who had selected him.[12]

Ohio State

In 2016, after two seasons coaching Berkeley Preparatory School and sending two players to Davidson College in North Carolina, Schiano was hired by head coach Urban Meyer to serve as defensive coordinator/associate head coach for the Ohio State Buckeyes football program, replacing Chris Ash who, coincidentally, left Ohio State to accept the head coaching position at Rutgers.

Following two successful seasons as Ohio State's defensive coordinator, Schiano became a target for several coaching jobs both in the NCAA and NFL. On November 26, 2017, it was reported that he was going to be the next head coach for the Tennessee Volunteers. Due to fan disapproval, the University backed out of the deal and he remained at Ohio State. Less than six weeks later, it was once again reported that Schiano would be leaving, but this time he would be going back to the NFL as the New England Patriots' defensive coordinator.[13] On February 7, 2018, Schiano decided to turn down the Patriots job and stay with the Buckeyes. [14]

Awards and bowl bids

Schiano received most of the major 2006 national Coach of the Year awards after orchestrating what was considered by many to be one of the great turnaround stories in college football history, transforming the hapless Scarlet Knights into a winning football program (see above).

On December 4, 2006, one day after Rutgers accepted a bid to play in the 2006 Texas Bowl against Kansas State, Schiano announced that he would not be a candidate for the recently vacated head coaching job at his previous employer, the University of Miami, ending rumors and speculation that he would leave his creation at upstart Rutgers to return to Miami.[15] He stated that he is "very happy at Rutgers" and that Rutgers is just beginning to "scratch the surface" of what the team can accomplish. He confirmed this by signing yet another contract extension, announced on February 16, 2007, upping his yearly compensation to $1.5 million per year and extending his deal with Rutgers to 2016.[16] Schiano's 2011 salary and compensation of $2.3 million[17] made him "by far" the highest-paid public employee in New Jersey,[18] as well as the highest paid coach in the Big East.[19]

In December 2007, The Star-Ledger reported that Schiano spoke with University of Michigan Athletic Director Bill Martin "for quite a while" on December 5 about the head coaching vacancy at the school.[20] Two days later, he withdrew his name from consideration and remained as the Rutgers Head Coach.[21] In 2008, after a bad start his Knights staged a come-from-behind season where they ended up 8–5 with the school's 4th straight bowl bid. Schiano's name once again came up in general speculation about the Miami head coaching position in 2010, after the firing of Randy Shannon.[22]

Controversy

Schiano is known for continuing aggressive play even near the end of the game, attempting to disrupt quarterback kneels by ramming the opposing team's center into their quarterback, which has drawn criticism from other NFL coaches for being unsportsmanlike.[23]

In 2016, a Philadelphia court released documents in relation to the Penn State child sex abuse scandal revealing testimony from Mike McQueary stating that Schiano was aware of the abuse by fellow assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.[24] In his testimony, McQueary claimed "only that he had — I can’t remember if it was one night or one morning — but that Greg had come into his office white as a ghost and said he just saw Jerry doing something to a boy in the shower. And that’s it. That’s all he ever told me.”[24] Schiano denied having knowledge of the abuse.[24]

On November 26, 2017, the University of Tennessee was set to announce Schiano as the head football coach.[25] However, due to a social media campaign including state representatives, alumni, national and local sportswriters, fans and gubernatorial candidates, unhappy with Schiano's tenure at Penn State during the child sex abuse scandal, Tennessee backed out of the deal.[26] Afterwards, officials from both Penn State and Ohio State defended Schiano, saying he had nothing to do with the scandal.[27] Tennessee received criticism from both national and local sportswriters for a perceived reactionary handling as a response to social media.[28][29][30]

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Rutgers Scarlet Knights (Big East Conference) (2001–2011)
2001 Rutgers 2–9 0–7 8th
2002 Rutgers 1–11 0–7 8th
2003 Rutgers 5–7 2–5 7th
2004 Rutgers 4–7 1–5 6th
2005 Rutgers 7–5 4–3 3rd L Insight
2006 Rutgers 11–2 5–2 T–2nd W Texas 12 12
2007 Rutgers 8–5 3–4 T–5th W International
2008 Rutgers 8–5 5–2 T–2nd W Papajohns.com
2009 Rutgers 9–4 3–4 T–4th W St. Petersburg
2010 Rutgers 4–8 1–6 8th
2011 Rutgers 9–4 4–3 T–4th W Pinstripe
Rutgers: 68–67 28–48
Total: 68–67

NFL

Team Year Regular Season Post Season
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
TB 2012 7 9 0 .438 4th in NFC South
TB 2013 4 12 0 .250 4th in NFC South
TB Total 11 21 0 .344
Total 11 21 0 .344

Coaching tree

Assistant coaches under Greg Schiano who became NCAA head coaches:

Personal life

Schiano is married and has four children. [31]

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 29, 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2012.
  2. ^ "Greg Schiano FB". njsportsheroes.com. Retrieved December 24, 2015.
  3. ^ http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/1999-01-23/sports/9901230113_1_greg-schiano-secondary-coach-bears-staff
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 29, 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2012.
  5. ^ Rutgers Ranked 12th in Final 2006 football Polls – Highest Season-Ending Ranking in School History Archived October 25, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. (Press Release January 9, 2007) at ScarletKnights.com (Official Website of Rutgers University athletics). Published by Rutgers University Athletics Department (no further authorship information available). Retrieved January 12, 2007
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on January 24, 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2012.
  7. ^ Here's how Greg Schiano's legacy still impacts Rutgers football
  8. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/new-york/ncf/news/story?id=5696563&source=ESPNHeadlines
  9. ^ Greg Schiano's commitment to Eric LeGrand speaks volumes about him
  10. ^ Sullivan: Schiano, LeGrand forever bonded
  11. ^ "Surprise: Buccaneers turn to Rutgers' Schiano as next coach". NFL.com. January 26, 2012
  12. ^ "Greg Schiano and GM Mark Dominik fired by Buccaneers". CBS Sports. December 30, 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  13. ^ "Greg Schiano Expected to Become New England Patriots Defensive Coordinator, Per Report". Eleven Warriors. February 5, 2018. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  14. ^ "Greg Schiano to stay at Ohio State, not join Patriots". Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  15. ^ "Schiano tells Miami he's not leaving Rutgers". ESPN.com. December 6, 2006.
  16. ^ "Schiano Signs Contract Extension Through 2016" Archived February 5, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.. ScarletKnights.com: The Official Site of Rutgers Athletics. February 16, 2007.
  17. ^ Rutgers University Employee Salaries. Asbury Park Press.
  18. ^ Mushnick, Phil (April 16, 2011). "Double up that entendre, will you?". New York Post.
  19. ^ Sargeant, Keith (November 16, 2011). "Schiano the highest-paid Big East coach, according to USA Today report". Home News Tribune.
  20. ^ Luicci, Tom (December 7, 2007). "Schiano talking to Michigan". The Star-Ledger.
  21. ^ Forde, Pat (December 7, 2007). "After talking to Michigan, Schiano sticking as Rutgers coach". ESPN.com
  22. ^ Milian, Jorge (November 29, 2010). "Possible candidates to be the next coach of the University of Miami Hurricanes". The Palm Beach Post.
  23. ^ Garafalo, Mike, "Coughlin to Schiano: 'You don't do that in this league'", USA Today, September 17, 2012. Accessed September 17, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c Boren, Cindy (July 12, 2016). "Greg Schiano, Tom Bradley knew of Jerry Sandusky abuse at Penn State, documents show". The Washington Post.
  25. ^ https://www.si.com/college-football/2017/11/26/greg-schiano-tennessee-volunteers-head-coach-contract
  26. ^ http://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/21579125/tennessee-volunteers-no-longer-hire-greg-schiano-head-coach
  27. ^ Spain, Kevin (November 27, 2017). "Officials from Penn State, Ohio State defend Greg Schiano". USA Today. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  28. ^ Culpepper, Chuck (November 27, 2017). "The Tennessee–Greg Schiano saga shows the charming and chilling power of fans". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  29. ^ King, Peter (November 27, 2017). "The Race Is On to Catch the Patriots and a Word About the Greg Schiano–Tennessee Mess". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  30. ^ Ziegler, John (November 26, 2017). "Greg Schiano Out at Tennessee Because of the Twitter Mob That Unfairly Destroyed Him". Mediaite. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  31. ^ http://news.rutgers.edu/medrel/special-content/summer-2011/greg-and-christy-sch-20110727

External links

2001 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2001 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Scarlet Knights were led by new head coach Greg Schiano and played their home games at Rutgers Stadium. They are a member of the Big East Conference. They finished the season 2–9, 0–7 in Big East play to finish in last place. Due to the Terrorist Attacks of September 11th, Rutgers September 15 home game against California was postponed until November 23.

2002 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2002 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Scarlet Knights were led by second-year head coach Greg Schiano and played their home games at Rutgers Stadium. They are a member of the Big East Conference. They finished the season 1–11, 0–7 in Big East play to finish in last place.

2003 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2003 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2003 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Scarlet Knights were led by third-year head coach Greg Schiano and played their home games at Rutgers Stadium. They are a member of the Big East Conference. They finished the season 5–7, 2–5 in Big East play to finish in a tie with Syracuse for 6th place.

2004 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2004 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2004 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Scarlet Knights were led by fourth-year head coach Greg Schiano and played their home games at Rutgers Stadium. They were a member of the Big East Conference. They finished the season 5–7, 1–5 in Big East play to finish in a tie with Temple for last place.

2005 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2005 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2005 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Scarlet Knights were led by fifth-year head coach Greg Schiano and played their home games at Rutgers Stadium. They are a member of the Big East Conference. They finished the season 7–5, 4–3 in Big East play to finish in a tie for third place. After the season, they were invited to their first Bowl game since 1978. They would lose 45–40 to the Arizona State Sun Devils in the Insight Bowl.

2007 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2007 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was led by seventh-year head coach Greg Schiano.

For the first time in the history of Rutgers football, the team entered a season ranked—they were 16th in both the Associated Press and Coaches polls. The Scarlet Knights finished the season with an 8–5 record that included a 52–30 victory over the Ball State Cardinals in the 2008 International Bowl. It marked the third consecutive appearance of the team in a post-season bowl game, and the second bowl game won by the team.

2009 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2009 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2009 NCAA Division I FBS football season. Their head coach was Greg Schiano and they played their home games at Rutgers Stadium in Piscataway, New Jersey. The Scarlet Knights finished the season 9–4, 3–4 in Big East play and won the St. Petersburg Bowl, 45–24, over UCF.

2010 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2010 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS college football season. The Scarlet Knights were led by head coach Greg Schiano in his 10th season. They played their home games at Rutgers Stadium and are members of the Big East Conference. They finished the season 4–8, 1–6 in Big East play.

2011 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2011 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Scarlet Knights were led by 11th year head coach Greg Schiano and played their home games at High Point Solutions Stadium. They are a member of the Big East Conference. They finished the season 9–4, 4–3 in Big East play to finish in a tie for fourth place. They were invited to the Pinstripe Bowl where they defeated Iowa State 27–13.

2012 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 2012 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Scarlet Knights played their home games at High Point Solutions Stadium in Piscataway, NJ as a member of the Big East Conference. This was the first season with Kyle Flood as the head coach, as former head coach Greg Schiano accepted the head coaching position for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. They finished the season 9–4, 5–2 in Big East play to win the school's first ever Big East Conference football championship, sharing the conference title with Cincinnati, Louisville, and Syracuse. They were invited to the Russell Athletic Bowl where they were defeated by Virginia Tech in overtime.

2013 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season

The 2013 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 38th season in the National Football League, and the second under head coach Greg Schiano. It also marked the 19th and final season under the ownership of Malcolm Glazer, who died on May 28, 2014. The Buccaneers finished with a record of 4–12 and failed to improve their 7–9 record from last season, and were eliminated from postseason contention in Week 13. For the first time since 1996, longtime cornerback Ronde Barber was not on the roster, as he retired in May 2013.

Despite having a +10 turnover margin (tied for 3rd best in the NFL), and franchise rookie quarterback records from third round draft pick Mike Glennon, the overall offensive production ranked near the bottom of the league in most categories. The team ranked 32nd (last) in total yards, 32nd (last) in passing yards, 30th in total points scored. The team also had the third-most penalties in the league (121 for 1,136 yards), and ranked 31st in third down conversions. Running back Doug Martin went on injured reserve halfway through the season with a shoulder injury. His replacement, Bobby Rainey had a solid performance, scoring his first career touchdown, and setting a franchise record for longest touchdown run (80 yards). On the defensive side, the offseason news was highlighted by the free agent acquisition of Darrelle Revis, and Lavonte David's stellar numbers.

2019 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 2019 Ohio State Buckeyes football team will represent the Ohio State University during the 2019 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Buckeyes will play their home games at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. This will be the Buckeyes' 130th overall season and 107th as a member of the Big Ten Conference. They will be led by head coach Ryan Day in his first season at Ohio State.

Chris Hewitt

Christopher Horace Hewitt (born July 22, 1974) is a former National Football League defensive back who is currently the secondary coach of the Baltimore Ravens. Hewitt played professionally for three seasons with the New Orleans Saints. After eight seasons on the coaching staff of the Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team, Hewitt was the special teams coach for the Baltimore Ravens and was the assistant secondary coach for the 2014 season.

Hewitt was born in Kingston, Jamaica and grew up in Englewood, New Jersey, where he attended Dwight Morrow High School. He played for the Cincinnati Bearcats football team at the collegiate level. Hewitt's 31.50 kickoff return average in the 1993 season ranks second on the all-time rankings for the Cincinnati Bearcats, while his 742 career kickoff return yards rank ninth and his 28.54 career yards per kickoff returns place him first on the school's rankings.Hewitt played as a defensive back and on special teams for the New Orleans Saints in 1997, starting two games and finishing the season with 12 tackles and a fumble recovery as a defensive back. In 1998, he again started two games and had 9 tackles and two sacks. In his third and final season with the Saints, Hewitt was limited to one tackle and a sack.He joined the coaching staff at Rutgers under Greg Schiano, where he spent eight years, including as running backs coach and defensive backs coach. As part of the NFL's Minority Coaching Fellowship Program, Hewitt worked on the staffs of the Cleveland Browns and Philadelphia Eagles, as well as the Ravens, who hired him in February 2012 as the team's assistant special teams coach. Hewitt was brought into the Ravens by head coach John Harbaugh, who had been Hewitt's special teams coach when he was playing at the age of 17 as a freshman at the University of Cincinnati. Hewitt was part of the Ravens coaching staff for the Raven's victory at Super Bowl XLVII in 2013, which was played in New Orleans at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, where Hewitt played in the NFL with the Saints.

Kyle Flood

Kyle J. Flood (born January 20, 1971) is an American football head coach and former player. He is the former head football coach of the Rutgers Scarlet Knights. Flood was named the 29th head football coach of the Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team after Greg Schiano accepted the National Football League head coaching position for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. He is the first Rutgers football head coach to be promoted from assistant since the 1973 season. Flood is a graduate of Iona College and earned four varsity letters for the Gaels between 1989 and 1992.

List of Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coaches

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers are a professional American football team based in Tampa, Florida. They are members of the Southern Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The franchise was founded as an NFL team in 1976 by Hugh Culverhouse. They lost their first 26 games and had one playoff win in its first 21 seasons before winning the Super Bowl in 2002.There have been ten head coaches for the Buccaneers franchise. The team has played 628 games in 40 seasons since joining the NFL. Three Buccaneers coaches, John McKay, Tony Dungy, and Jon Gruden, have taken the Buccaneers to the playoffs, while only Gruden has won the Super Bowl with the team, at Super Bowl XXXVII. The team's all-time leader in games coached is McKay (133) and the leader in wins is Gruden (57); Dungy leads all Buccaneers coaches in winning percentage (.563). Leeman Bennett has the lowest winning percentage (.125) of all Buccaneers coaches.

Robb Smith

Robb Smith (born May 10, 1975) is an American football coach and former player. He is the former defensive coordinator for the Minnesota Golden Gophers. His hiring was reported January 9, 2017 by ESPN. Previously, he held the same position for the Arkansas Razorbacks. He was formerly the linebackers coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers under coach Greg Schiano during the 2013 season.

Rutgers Scarlet Knights football

The Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represents Rutgers University in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA). Rutgers competes as a member of the East Division of the Big Ten Conference. Prior to joining the Big Ten, the team was a member of the American Athletic Conference (formerly the Big East Conference) from 1991 to 2013. Rutgers plays its home games at High Point Solutions Stadium, in Piscataway, New Jersey. The team is currently led by head coach Chris Ash.

The Rutgers football team is notable for playing in what is considered to be the first ever intercollegiate football game in 1869, in which they defeated Princeton University by a score of 6–4. For this reason, Rutgers has been described as "the birthplace of college football."

Stephen Belichick

Stephen C. Belichick (born March 25, 1987) is an American football coach who is the current safeties coach for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL).

After attending The Rivers School in Weston, Massachusetts where he played lacrosse and was an All-League Honorable Mention selection in his senior year, Belichick attended Rutgers, where he played lacrosse as a defenseman and long-stick midfielder (LSM) from 2008 through 2011, and as a long-snapper for Rutgers Football under coach Greg Schiano in 2011On Thursday May 10, 2012, Belichick was hired to the New England Patriots coaching staff as a coaching assistant, a position in which he would serve for four seasons before being named safeties coach prior to the start of the 2016 season.On February 5, 2017, Belichick was part of the Patriots coaching staff that won Super Bowl LI. In the game, the Patriots defeated the Atlanta Falcons by a score of 34–28 in overtime.Belichick is the son of current New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick, and the grandson of Steve Belichick. His younger brother, Brian, also works in the New England Patriots organization, as a coaching assistant.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers are a professional American football franchise based in Tampa, Florida. The Buccaneers currently compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member team of the National Football Conference (NFC) South division. Along with the Seattle Seahawks, the team joined the NFL in 1976 as an expansion team. The Bucs played their first season in the American Football Conference (AFC) West division as part of the 1976 expansion plan, whereby each new franchise would play every other franchise over the first two years. After the season, the club switched conferences with the Seahawks and became a member of the NFC Central division. During the 2002 league realignment, the Bucs joined three former NFC West teams to form the NFC South. The club is owned by the Glazer family, and plays its home games at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.

The Buccaneers are the first post-merger expansion team to win a division title, win a playoff game, and to host and play in a conference championship game; all three accomplishments occurred during the 1979 season. They are also the first team since the merger to complete a winning season when starting 10 or more rookies, which happened in the 2010 season. In 1976 and 1977, the Buccaneers lost their first 26 games. They would not win their first game in franchise history until Week 13, of 14, in 1977. After a brief winning era in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the team suffered through 14 consecutive losing seasons. Then, for a 10-year period, they were consistent playoff contenders and won Super Bowl XXXVII at the end of the 2002 season, but have not yet returned to the Super Bowl; thus the Bucs, along with the New Orleans Saints and New York Jets, are the only NFL teams to win their lone Super Bowl appearance.

As of the end of 2018 NFL season, the Buccaneers have played 43 seasons and compiled an overall record of 266–424–1, with a regular-season record of 255–404–1 and a playoff record of 6–9.

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