Greg Luzinski

Gregory Michael "The Bull" Luzinski (born November 22, 1950) is an American former professional baseball player, who played Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago White Sox.

Luzinski was a left fielder who spent the majority of his career with the Philadelphia Phillies (1970–80), and retired as a member of the Chicago White Sox (1981–84).

Greg Luzinski
Greg Luzinski
Luzinski in 2011
Left fielder / Designated hitter
Born: November 22, 1950 (age 68)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 9, 1970, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
September 24, 1984, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.276
Home runs307
Runs batted in1,128
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Biography

Born in Chicago, Luzinski attended Notre Dame High School in Niles, Illinois. He made his MLB debut on September 9, 1970 at age 19, pinch-hitting for the Phillies in a loss to the New York Mets at Shea Stadium.

Playing career

At 6'1' and weighing 255 pounds, Luzinski was a well-liked Phillie and a feared slugger who could also hit for average despite striking out frequently. While he was a poor defensive left fielder, he hit .300 or better for three consecutive seasons during the prime of his career, and was a career .276 hitter, with 307 home runs, and 1,128 RBIs. Luzinski was selected to be a National League (NL) All-Star, every year between 1975 and 1978, highlighted by the home run he hit off Jim Palmer in 1977’s mid-Summer classic. In 1978, Luzinski was the top NL All-Star vote-getter. He was also the Senior Circuit’s Most Valuable Player (MVP) runner-up in 1975 (when he led the National League in RBIs with 120) and 1977, when he posted career highs in batting average (.309), home runs (39), and RBIs (130).

Greg Luzinski 1972
Luzinski, circa 1972

He hit safely in every (postseason) game — and had at least one home run in each of the three National League Championship Series (NLCS)—played by the Phillies from 1976 to 1978, though Philadelphia did not advance to the World Series in any of those years. In 1980, he suffered a major slump with injuries in the regular season, batting just .228, with 19 home runs, and 56 RBIs in 106 games, but came back with two game-winning hits in the 1980 National League Championship Series: a two-out two-run home run in the bottom of the 6th inning in Game 1 (the only home run hit in the entire 1980 NLCS); and a pinch-hit RBI double to score Pete Rose in the top of the 10th inning of Game 4, as Philadelphia went on to beat the Houston Astros in five games. Those hits against Houston were perhaps not only the biggest hits of his career, but also among the most impactful in franchise history, as that team went on to bring the Phillies their first world championship, having emerged victorious over the Kansas City Royals in the 1980 World Series, 4 games to 2. At one time, Luzinski held the consecutive game hitting streak record for a league championship series with 13.

He joined the Chicago White Sox the next season, and became one of the top sluggers and designated hitters in the American League. With the White Sox, he was chosen the Designated Hitter of the Year for 1981 and also in 1983, the season when he set a then-record for most home runs in a season by a designated hitter with 32, and thrice hit the roof of the old Comiskey Park in Chicago. Luzinski hit five home runs in five consecutive games, a franchise mark, which has since been tied by Ron Kittle, Frank Thomas (twice), Carlos Lee, and Paul Konerko. Luzinski returned to the postseason in the 1983 American League Championship Series, which the Sox lost to Baltimore three games to one.

Luzinski also hit grand slams in two consecutive games in 1984. Luzinski became a free agent at the end of the 1984 season but chose to retire on February 4, 1985.[1]

Post-retirement

From his retirement from professional baseball in 1985 until 1992, Luzinski was the head baseball coach, and later head football coach, at Holy Cross Academy in Delran Township, New Jersey.[2]

Still a fan favorite in Philadelphia, he opened "Bull's Barbecue" in the Phillies' new Citizens Bank Park.

He lives in Bonita Springs, Florida.

His son, Ryan, was the first round pick of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1992 Major League Baseball draft. Ryan was a promising power hitter when he spurned a letter of intent with the University of Miami to sign with the Dodgers.[3] However, he never quite lived up to his promise. Blocked by Mike Piazza's ascent with the Dodgers, he bounced around the team's farm system until a trade to the Baltimore Orioles in 1997. In eight minor league seasons, he hit .265 with 49 home runs and 296 RBI but could never make the move from AAA to the Majors.

Honors and awards

The Roberto Clemente Award, given annually to a Major League Baseball player who demonstrates sportsmanship and community involvement, was presented to Luzinski in 1978.

In 1989, Luzinski was inducted into the National Polish-American Sports Hall of Fame. [1]

See also

References

  1. ^ Greg Luzinski to retire
  2. ^ Roncace, Kelly. "Former Phillies slugger to be inducted into SJ sports museum", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, March 31, 2016. Accessed November 28, 2017. "Luzinski retired from the MLB in February 1985, and began coaching baseball at Holy Cross High School in Delran in March of the same year. 'I started with baseball, then moved to football when the former coach went to Moorestown High School,' he said. He continued coaching until January 1992 when he retired from the position and moved to Florida."
  3. ^ "BASEBALL; A Baby Bull Stands Out From the Herd". New York Times. May 27, 1992. Retrieved November 12, 2014.

External links

1968 Major League Baseball draft

The 1968 Major League Baseball (MLB) draft took place prior to the 1968 MLB season. The draft saw the New York Mets take shortstop Tim Foli first overall.

1976 National League Championship Series

The 1976 National League Championship Series faced off the Cincinnati Reds (known for their nickname at the time, The Big Red Machine) and the Philadelphia Phillies. The Reds swept the best-of-five series in three games, winning easily in the first two games, and in their last at bat in Game 3.

Stars of the series for the Reds included batters Johnny Bench (4 for 12, HR), Dave Concepción (4 runs scored), George Foster (2 H, both home runs), Ken Griffey (5 for 13, triple), Pete Rose (6 for 14, 2 RBIs, 3 runs scored), and pitchers Don Gullett (win, 8 IP, 2 hits), Pedro Borbón (​4 1⁄3 IP, 0.00 ERA), and Pat Zachry (win, 5 IP, 3 SO).

1977 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1977 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 48th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 19, 1977, at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx, New York, New York the home of the New York Yankees of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 7–5.

The host Yankees won the World Series; the third time in history that a team hosting the All-Star Game would win the World Series in the same year. As of 2018, the 1977 Yankees were the last team to accomplish this. The previous teams to accomplish this were the 1939 New York Yankees and the 1959 Los Angeles Dodgers.

This was Yankee Stadium's third time as host of the All-Star Game, and it would be its last until 2008; the last year of the park's use by the Yankees.

1977 National League Championship Series

The 1977 National League Championship Series was a best-of-five matchup between the West Division champion Los Angeles Dodgers and the East Division champion Philadelphia Phillies. The Dodgers beat the Phillies three games to one and went on to lose the 1977 World Series to the New York Yankees.

1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 49th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 11, 1978, at San Diego Stadium in San Diego, home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in a 7-3 victory for the NL.

This was the first All-Star Game to be played in San Diego. It would return in 1992 to be played in the same stadium, though it was renamed Jack Murphy Stadium by that time.

The honorary captains were Brooks Robinson (for the AL) and Eddie Mathews (for the NL).

1978 National League Championship Series

The 1978 National League Championship Series was a best-of-five matchup for the second straight year between the West Division champion Los Angeles Dodgers and the East Division champion Philadelphia Phillies. The Dodgers beat the Phillies three games to one once again and lost the World Series to the New York Yankees, as they had the year before.

1980 National League Championship Series

The 1980 National League Championship Series was played between the Philadelphia Phillies and the Houston Astros from October 7 to 12. Philadelphia won the series three games to two to advance to the World Series, eventually defeating the Kansas City Royals for their first World Championship. The 1980 NLCS is widely regarded as one of the most exciting postseason series in baseball history. The last four games went into extra innings; Game 1, the only one that went 9 innings, ended in a 3–1 Philadelphia victory.

1981 Chicago White Sox season

The 1981 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 81st season in the major leagues, and their 82nd season overall. They finished with a record 54-52, good enough for 3rd place in the American League West, 8.5 games behind the 1st place Oakland Athletics. However, due to a player's strike, the Athletics would play the 50-53 Kansas City Royals, who had finished behind the White Sox.

Owner Bill Veeck attempted to sell the club to Ed DeBartolo, but the offer was turned down by the other owners. Veeck was then forced to sell to a different investment group headed by Jerry Reinsdorf and Eddie Einhorn.

1982 Chicago White Sox season

The 1982 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 82nd season in the major leagues, and their 83rd season overall. They finished with a record 87-75, good enough for 3rd place in the American League West, 6 games behind the 1st place California Angels.

1983 American League Championship Series

The 1983 American League Championship Series was played between the Chicago White Sox and the Baltimore Orioles from October 5 to 8.

The Orioles won the series three games to one. Although the White Sox took Game 1 won by a score of 2–1, the Orioles came back to win the last three games of the series. The Orioles went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in five games in the 1983 World Series. In the regular season the White Sox won the West Division by twenty games with a 99–63 record. The Orioles won the East Division by six games with a 98–64 record.

1983 Chicago White Sox season

The 1983 Chicago White Sox season was a season in American baseball. It involved the White Sox winning the American League West championship on September 17. It marked their first postseason appearance since the 1959 World Series. It was the city of Chicago's first baseball championship of any kind (division, league, or world), since the White Sox themselves reached the World Series twenty-four years earlier.

After the White Sox went through a winning streak around the All-Star break, Texas Rangers manager Doug Rader said the White Sox "...weren't playing well. They're winning ugly." This phrase became a rallying cry for the team, and they are often referred to as the "Winning Ugly" team (and their uniforms as the "Winning Ugly" uniforms).

1984 Chicago White Sox season

The 1984 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 84th season in the major leagues, and their 85th season overall. They finished with a record 74-88, good enough for 5th place in the American League West, 10 games behind the 1st place Kansas City Royals.

The Sox' 1984 season is most famous for a 25-inning game on May 8, 1984, against the Milwaukee Brewers. The game was suspended after 17 innings at 1 a.m. It was completed the following night, with the White Sox winning 7-6 on Harold Baines's walk-off home run.

Clint Compton

Robert Clinton Compton (born November 1, 1950 in Montgomery, Alabama) is a former left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago Cubs. His entire major-league career consisted of a two-inning appearance during the Cubs' October 3, 1972 game against the Philadelphia Phillies.

Compton was drafted in the 3rd round of the 1968 MLB June amateur draft out of Robert E. Lee High School, 13 picks before future All-Star Lynn McGlothen. After his second season in the Braves' minor league system, he was traded with Mickey Rivers to the California Angels for Bob Priddy and future Hall of Famer Hoyt Wilhelm. The Cubs selected Compton from the Angels in the 1971 Rule 5 draft and he spent the 1972 season with the AA Midland Cubs before a late-season call-up.

On October 3, 1972, Compton came on in relief of Cub hurler Larry Gura in the top of the 6th at Wrigley Field. He retired the side in order (John Bateman, Steve Carlton, and Terry Harmon) in the 6th but quickly got into trouble in the 7th. Larry Bowa singled to lead it off, followed by a Mike Schmidt single in Schmidt's first at-bat of the game. A walk to Greg Luzinski loaded the bases with nobody out, and another walk (to Joe Lis) forced in the Phillies' ninth run of the game. Compton then induced Roger Freed to ground into a run-scoring double play before Bill Robinson popped out to Carmen Fanzone for the final out of Compton's appearance, and as it would turn out, his major league career. Carlton earned his 27th win that day to finish with a 27-10 record for the last-place Phillies, which would earn him the Cy Young Award.

Compton spent all of 1973 with the Cubs' AAA affiliate Wichita Aeros but did not get promoted to the big league club. He never played professional baseball again, retiring from the game after 1973 at age 22.

Dan Baker (PA announcer)

Dan Baker (born September 22, 1946) is an American public address announcer best known for many years as the voice of Veterans Stadium, Lincoln Financial Field, and Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia.

Born in Philadelphia, Baker grew up in Mount Ephraim, New Jersey and graduated from Audubon High School. He earned his undergraduate degree at Glassboro State College (since renamed as Rowan University) and went on to earn a master's degree at Temple University.Baker has been the public address announcer for the Philadelphia Phillies since 1972 and was the Philadelphia Eagles PA announcer from 1985 to 2014. He has served as a PA voice for five World Series (1980, 1983, 1993, 2008 and 2009), two Major League Baseball All Star Games (1976 and 1996), and three NFC Championship Games (2002, 2003, and 2004).

Though the Phillies and Eagles left Veterans Stadium for new venues (the Eagles to Lincoln Financial Field in 2003 and the Phillies to Citizens Bank Park in 2004), Baker remained the PA announcer for both teams. He also serves as PA announcer for the Army–Navy Game when it is played in Philadelphia as well as Drexel University Dragons men's basketball.

After the 2009 retirement of the New York Yankees' Bob Sheppard, who was also PA announcer for the Eagles' biggest rival, New York Giants, Baker became the longest-tenured PA announcer in Major League Baseball.Between Baker and former Chicago Cubs' public address announcer Pat Pieper, the 2017 MLB season will mark 101 consecutive seasons that one of them has been announcing games. Pieper from 1916–1974 and Baker from 1972–present. The last game that was played without Pieper or Baker announcing games was the 1915 World Series on October 13, 1915.Baker was the radio announcer for Drexel University Dragons men's basketball on WNTP 990 AM from 1997–2012, after which he retired and became the team's public address announcer. Before that, he broadcast Philadelphia BIG 5 Basketball games for 21 years while additionally serving as its executive director from 1981–96. Baker was named to the Big 5 Hall of Fame in 1997 and was inducted into the Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame in 2012.

Baker co-hosts a radio show on WBCB (AM) 1490 called "Bull Session" with former Philadelphia Phillies slugger Greg Luzinski, for whom the show is named. The show airs at 6:00 pm on Monday nights, and each week they bring in a special guest, usually a current or retired player.Baker reprises his role as the Philadelphia Phillies PA announcer for select Phillies away games at multiple venues that comprise a chain of Philadelphia area sports bars. The events are billed as "Summer Nights with Dan Baker". At these appearances, Baker announces the game over the sports bar's PA system in exactly the same fashion as he would if he was announcing an actual Phillies home game.

On May 7, 2014, the Eagles announced that Baker would no longer serve as their public address announcer, citing that they decided to make a change in the role. Baker will continue to be the public address announcer for the Phillies.

On September 16, 2015, XFINITY Live! announced that Baker would be the in-house public address announcer for Philadelphia Eagles games. Baker's duties are similar to those he had as the public address announcer for the Eagles, which include energizing the crowd with his signature calls.

Edgar Martínez Award

The Edgar Martínez Outstanding Designated Hitter Award, commonly referred to as the Edgar Martínez Award and originally known as the Outstanding Designated Hitter Award, has been presented annually to the most outstanding designated hitter (DH) in the American League (AL) in Major League Baseball (MLB) since 1973. The award is voted on by club beat reporters, broadcasters and AL public relations departments. All players with a minimum of 100 at bats at DH are eligible. It was given annually by members of the Associated Press who are beat writers, broadcasters, and public relations directors. The Associated Press discontinued the award in 2000, but it was picked up by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, which has administered it since.In September 2004, at Safeco Field ceremonies in honor of Edgar Martínez, Commissioner Bud Selig announced that the award would be renamed for the five-time recipient (1995, 1997–98, 2000–01). In an 18-year career with the Seattle Mariners, primarily as a designated hitter, Martínez batted .312, with 309 career home runs and 1,261 runs batted in.David Ortiz has won the award eight times, more than any other player (2003–2007, 2011, 2013, 2016). Other repeat winners of the award include Martinez himself (five times), three-time winner Hal McRae (1976, 1980, and 1982) and two-time winners Willie Horton (1975 and 1979), Greg Luzinski (1981 and 1983), Don Baylor (1985 and 1986), Harold Baines (1987 and 1988), Dave Parker (1989 and 1990), and Paul Molitor (1993 and 1996). Boston Red Sox players have won the most Edgar Martínez Awards with eleven.

List of Major League Baseball career strikeouts by batters leaders

In baseball, a strikeout (or strike-out) occurs when a batter accumulates three strikes during a time at bat (i.e. the batter fails to hit the ball in three successive pitches). It usually means the batter is out. A strikeout is a statistic recorded for both pitchers and batters, and is denoted by K.Reggie Jackson holds the record for the most career strikeouts by a batter with 2,597. Jim Thome (2,548), Adam Dunn (2,379), Sammy Sosa (2,306), Alex Rodriguez (2,287) and Andres Galarraga (2,003) are the only other hitters to strikeout over 2,000 times.

List of Philadelphia Phillies first-round draft picks

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They play in the National League East division. Since the institution of Major League Baseball's Rule 4 Draft, the Phillies have selected 49 players in its first round. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is Major League Baseball's primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs to its teams. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks.Of the 49 players picked in the first round by the Phillies, 25 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 19 of these were right-handed, while 6 were left-handed. Nine players picked in the initial round were outfielders, while six catchers, four first basemen, and three shortstops were selected. The team also selected one player each at second base and third base. Thirteen of the 45 players came from high schools or universities in the state of California, while Texas and Florida follow, with six and five players, respectively.Eight Phillies first-round picks have won a championship with the franchise. Greg Luzinski (1968), Larry Christenson (1972), and Lonnie Smith (1974) were on the roster when the team won the 1980 World Series. Third baseman (later left fielder) Pat Burrell (1998), pitchers Adam Eaton (1996), Brett Myers (1999) and Cole Hamels (2002), and second baseman Chase Utley (2000) were all members of the team during the Phillies' 2008 World Series championship.The Phillies have had five compensatory and seven supplementary picks since the institution of the First-Year Player Draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the prior off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. The Phillies have failed to sign their first-round pick twice. The first occurrence was in 1965 (Mike Adamson); however, compensatory picks were not awarded at that time. The second occurrence was in 1997, when outfielder J. D. Drew, at the advice of agent Scott Boras, refused to sign a contract worth less than $10 million. Drew sat out of affiliated baseball in 1997, playing instead for the independent St. Paul Saints of the Northern League, and re-entered the 1998 Draft the following year. The Phillies were awarded an additional pick in that draft, with which they selected outfielder Eric Valent.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 202 players have had surnames beginning with the letter M, which is the largest total of any single letter, followed by S with 187 players. The highest numbers of individual batters belongs to M (115), and S has the most pitchers (90). The letters with the smallest representation are Q (5 players), U (6 players), Z (7 players), and Y (8 players); however, there has never been a Phillies player, nor a player in Major League Baseball history, whose surname begins with the letter X.Thirty-two players in Phillies history have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Those players for whom the Hall recognizes the Phillies as their primary team include Grover Cleveland Alexander, Richie Ashburn, Dave Bancroft, Steve Carlton, Ed Delahanty, Billy Hamilton, Chuck Klein, Robin Roberts, Mike Schmidt, and Sam Thompson; manager Harry Wright was also inducted for his contributions with the club. The Phillies have retired numbers for six players, including Schmidt (#20), Carlton (#32), Ashburn (#1), Roberts (#36), and Jim Bunning (#14); the sixth retired number is Jackie Robinson's #42, which was retired throughout baseball in 1997. The Phillies also honor two additional players with the letter "P" in the manner of a retired number: Alexander played before numbers were used in the major leagues; and Klein wore a variety of numbers in his Phillies career.Thirty-six Phillies players have been elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. All of the players listed above (save Robinson) have been elected; also included are Dick Allen, Bob Boone, Larry Bowa, Johnny Callison, Gavvy Cravath, Darren Daulton, Del Ennis, Jimmie Foxx, Dallas Green, Granny Hamner, Willie Jones, John Kruk, Mike Lieberthal, Greg Luzinski, Garry Maddox, Sherry Magee, Tug McGraw, Juan Samuel, Curt Schilling, Bobby Shantz, Chris Short, Curt Simmons, Tony Taylor, John Vukovich, and Cy Williams. Foxx and Shantz were inducted for their contributions as members of the Philadelphia Athletics. Two non-players are also members of the Wall of Fame for their contributions to the Phillies: broadcaster Harry Kalas; and manager, general manager, and team executive Paul Owens.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (L)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 101 have had surnames beginning with the letter L. One of those players, second baseman Nap Lajoie, has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame; he played for Philadelphia for five seasons (1896–1900). Greg Luzinski is a member of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame; the left fielder played for the Phillies for 11 seasons, batting .281 and hitting 253 doubles.Among the 56 batters in this list, catcher Mike Loan has the highest batting average, at .500; he hit safely in one of his two career at-bats with the Phillies. Other players with an average above .300 include Lajoie (.345), Ralph LaPointe (.308 in one season), Freddy Leach (.312 in six seasons), Dan Leahy (.333 in one season), Cliff W. Lee (.315 in four seasons), Greg Legg (.409 in two seasons), Jesse Levan (.444 in one season), Jim Lindeman (.313 in two seasons), and Kenny Lofton (.335 in one season). Luzinski leads all members of this list with 223 home runs and 811 runs batted in.Of this list's 46 pitchers, the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage, is shared by three pitchers: Bobby Locke, who won one game in three seasons (1962–1964) with the Phillies; Kyle Lohse, who went 3–0 in 2007; and Marcelino López, who posted a 1–0 record during the 1963 season. Jim Lonborg's 75 victories and 60 defeats are tops in both of those statistical categories, and he also leads in strikeouts, with 551 in 7 seasons. In earned run average, Aquilino López is the leader; he averaged 2.13 earned runs per game in 2005.Johnny Lush is one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, accomplishing the feat on May 1, 1906. Lush also made more than 30% of his career appearances with Philadelphia as a first baseman, batting .254 and amassing 53 extra-base hits.

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