Greg Landry

Gregory Paul Landry (born December 18, 1946) is a former American football player and coach who played quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) from 1968 to 1981, and again in 1984. He played for the Detroit Lions, the Baltimore Colts and the Chicago Bears. He also played college football at Massachusetts.

Greg Landry
No. 11
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:December 18, 1946 (age 72)
Nashua, New Hampshire
Career information
College:UMass
NFL Draft:1968 / Round: 1 / Pick: 11
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:98–103
Yards:16,052
Passer rating:72.9
Player stats at NFL.com

Playing career

Landry was the first quarterback selected in the first round (11th overall) of the 1968 NFL Draft after a stellar career at the University of Massachusetts where he was selected All-Yankee Conference for two seasons. In 1971, as a member of the Lions, he passed for 2,237 yards and 16 touchdowns and was named to his only Pro Bowl that year.

In 1976, he passed for 2,191 yards and 17 touchdowns and was named the NFL's Comeback Player of the Year.

After setting a couple of passing records with the Lions, he moved on to play for the Baltimore Colts for three seasons where in 1979, as a member of the Colts, he played brilliantly despite a 5–11 record after a season-ending injury to starting quarterback Bert Jones. He passed for a career best 2,932 yards and 15 touchdowns that season. He then played for George Allen on the Chicago Blitz and Arizona Wranglers in the United States Football League (USFL) in 1983 and 1984. He started one game as an emergency quarterback for the Chicago Bears in 1984 before retiring as a player.

Landry was also notable as a rusher, in addition to his passing. He rushed for over 2,600 yards and 21 touchdowns in his career, exceeding 500 yards on the ground in both 1971 and 1972, as well as averaging ten yards per carry in 1970 and scoring 9 touchdowns in 1972.[1] He currently ranks third on the all-time Lions career passing yardage list (12,451), and ranks second in touchdown passes with 80.

Coaching career

Landry began his coaching career in 1985 handling the Cleveland Browns quarterbacks, and later joined Mike Ditka's staff as quarterback coach in 1986, following the Bears' rout of the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX. With the Bears, he was also the wide receivers and tight ends coach before taking over as offensive coordinator from 1988 to 1992 and participating in six division championships.

Following the 1992 season, he was hired as the offensive coordinator at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign for two seasons. The 1994 Illinois Fighting Illini had the second-best passing offense in the Big Ten Conference, which carried the team to a 30–0 win in the Liberty Bowl over East Carolina, which was making its first bowl appearance in 16 seasons.

The following year, Landry returned to the Lions as quarterback coach, helping them to become the top offensive unit in the NFL and guiding Scott Mitchell to record-setting passing numbers that season. He retired from coaching after the 1996 season to become a local radio host.

Honors

In 2012, Landry was inducted into the National Polish-American Sports Hall of Fame.

References

  1. ^ "Greg Landry Stats - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.

External links

1972 Buffalo Bills season

The 1972 Buffalo Bills season was the 13th season for the club and its third in the National Football League. It was also their last season at War Memorial Stadium which had been their home field since the franchise started in 1960.

1973 Detroit Lions season

The 1973 Detroit Lions season was their 44th in the league. Don McCafferty, who served as an assistant under Don Shula during Shula's stint as head coach of the Baltimore Colts, and whom as head coach himself coached the Colts to a Super Bowl V victory over the Dallas Cowboys, would replace Joe Schmidt as head coach. However, the team would still fail to improve on their previous season's output of 8–5–1, finishing a mediocre 6–7–1. The team missed the playoffs for the third straight season.

1976 Detroit Lions season

The 1976 Detroit Lions season was the 47th season in franchise history. After the first four games of the season, Rick Forzano resigned under pressure of owner William Clay Ford, and was replaced by one time BYU head coach and Lions assistant Tommy Hudspeth. In spite of a stellar season by quarterback Greg Landry, that year's NFL Comeback Player Of The Year, the team was still mired in mediocrity, fininsing 6–8.

1979 Baltimore Colts season

The 1979 Baltimore Colts season was the 27th season for the team in the National Football League (NFL). Veteran Quarterback Greg Landry replaced Bert Jones as starter, as the Colts continued to struggle. Following the season Coach Ted Marchibroda would be fired, and replaced by Mike McCormack. The Colts finished the NFL’s 1979 season with a record of 5 wins and 11 losses, and fifth in the AFC East division.

1984 Chicago Bears season

The 1984 Chicago Bears season was their 65th regular season and 15th post-season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–6 record, earning them a spot in the NFL playoffs. The Bears went on to lose in the NFC Championship Game 23–0 to the eventual Super Bowl Champion San Francisco 49ers.

The Bears opened their 1984 training camp in a new location, Platteville, Wisconsin as head coach Mike Ditka needed his team to get away from any distractions they might face at home. The team was on the verge of discovering a group of young leaders for the first time, and began to show the dominating defense that would emerge in full the following season, and pushed much farther than anyone expected them to go.

Chicago opened the season by routing the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 34–14. In Week Two, they shut out the Denver Broncos 27–0 behind a huge day from star running back Walter Payton. This game featured a famous image from Payton's career: a 50+ yard run down the sideline, led by 2nd-year guard Mark Bortz, an 8th round draft pick that was converted from defensive tackle.

In Week Three, they were without the services of starting quarterback Jim McMahon at Green Bay, reserve quarterback Bob Avellini took the reins. Chicago's offense performed poorly, but still managed a 9–7 victory. This contest marked the first meeting between Mike Ditka and Packers head coach Forrest Gregg. It would be a rivalry that would go down in history as arguably the dirtiest era in Chicago-Green Bay football.In Week Four, the Bears' lack of offensive power was evident as they lost to the Seattle Seahawks 38–9. After this loss, Ditka cut Avellini. The following week, the Bears lost to the Dallas Cowboys 23–14, bringing their record to 3–2.

On October 7, 1984, Walter Payton reached a major milestone as he surpassed Jim Brown as the game's all-time leading rusher in yards, he did it in the third quarter of a Week Six home game against the New Orleans Saints. The Bears beat the Saints 20–7. Incidentally, the 1984 Bears ran for the second-most rushing attempts in a season, with 674.In Week Seven, the Bears lost 38–21 to the Cardinals in St. Louis the following week. Sitting at 4–3, the Bears proceeded to win three in a row. They beat Tampa Bay 44–9, then Minnesota Vikings at home, 16–7. Following the Minnesota win came the biggest challenge for the Bears: a showdown with the defending world champion Los Angeles Raiders. The Bears beat the Raiders 17–6, a game that showcased Richard Dent, who collected three sacks against Raiders QB Marc Wilson. Dent would finish with 17.5 sacks, third-most for the season behind Mark Gastineau and Andre Tippett. The Bears would then record 72 sacks, a team record. The Bears' victory was marred by a kidney laceration suffered by Jim McMahon, ending his season.

Six-year veteran QB Steve Fuller had been acquired from the Los Angeles Rams prior to the 1984 season for insurance in case McMahon was injured. The investment paid off, as Fuller guided the Bears to a 2–1 record over the next 3 games. In the third game at Minnesota's new Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Week Thirteen, the team clinched its first NFC Central Division title.

After the Minnesota game, Fuller was injured, and Chicago was faced with another quarterback problem. Ineffective Rusty Lisch replaced the injured Fuller and lost the Week Fourteen game at San Diego, then started the following week against Green Bay at home. Lisch was again ineffective, so Ditka inserted none other than Walter Payton behind center in the shotgun formation. Payton, unsurprisingly, was ineffective as well, and the Bears lost to the Packers 20–14.

Fuller was expected to return by the playoffs, but Ditka did not want to enter the postseason with another loss. The Bears signed 14-year journeyman Greg Landry to start his last NFL game against his previous team, the Detroit Lions, in the season finale. The Bears won 30–13, and were headed to the playoffs for the first time since 1979.

Alan Risher

Alan David Risher (born May 6, 1961) was a quarterback in the United States Football League (USFL) who played for the Arizona Wranglers. The USFL was a 12 team league in 1983, so although Risher was drafted 170th overall in the league's 1983 draft, he was actually the team's 15th round pick that year. Risher was the starting quarterback for the Wranglers for most of the league's initial 1983 season. He is known best for directing what is widely acknowledged as the greatest upset in USFL history. He backed up Greg Landry on the 1984 Western Conference Champion Wranglers squad.

He would later play in the National Football League for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Green Bay Packers going 2-1 as a starting quarterback for the Packers during the strike. Risher played collegiate ball for Louisiana State University. Alan, has a son, Chad Risher, who owns his own business in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Bill Munson

William Alan Munson (August 11, 1941 – July 10, 2000) was an American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) from 1964 through 1979. He also played college football for Utah State where he set multiple passing records as a senior in 1963.

Drafted by the Los Angeles Rams in the first round of the 1964 NFL Draft, Munson was the Rams' starting quarterback in 1964 and 1965 and a backup to Roman Gabriel in 1966 and 1967. In 1968, Munson was traded to the Detroit Lions where he remained for eight seasons (1968–1975), competing all the while for the starting quarterback position with Greg Landry. Munson concluded his career as a backup quarterback for the Seattle Seahawks (1976), San Diego Chargers (1977), and Buffalo Bills (1978–1979).

In 16 NFL seasons, Munson appeared in 107 games, 66 of them as a starting quarterback. His teams compiled a 27–34–5 record in the 66 games he started. Munson completed 1,070 of 1,982 passes for 12,896 yards, 84 touchdowns, and 80 interceptions. He also accumulated 548 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns on 130 carries.

Bob Williams (quarterback)

Robert Allen Williams (January 2, 1930 – May 26, 2016) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL).

David Humm

David Henry Humm (April 2, 1952 – March 27, 2018) was an American professional football player, a quarterback in the NFL from 1975–84 for the Oakland Raiders, Buffalo Bills, Baltimore Colts, and Los Angeles Raiders. He played college football at the University of Nebraska.

Dick Flanagan

Richard E. Flanagan (October 31, 1927 in Sidney, Ohio – September 27, 1997) was a National Football League center who played eight seasons. He also played RB in college and his first year with the Bears, LB until his last 2 years in the game, and OG also.

Fred Enke (American football)

Frederick William Enke (December 15, 1924 – April 13, 2014) was a professional American football quarterback who played in seven National Football League (NFL) seasons from 1948 to 1954 for the Detroit Lions, the Philadelphia Eagles, and the Baltimore Colts. He started for the Lions for two years. Enke played college football at the University of Arizona and was drafted in the seventh round of the 1948 NFL Draft.

Enke was inducted into the Arizona High School Sports Hall of Fame as an inaugural member in 2007. He graduated from Tucson High School as a three-sport star (football, baseball, basketball) in 1943 after starting a 52-game winning streak for the school as quarterback. He was a two-time All State quarterback leading the Badgers to the State Championship in all three sports during the 1942–43 school year. He was the first Arizonan to start as a quarterback in the NFL.After leaving the NFL, Enke retired to Casa Grande, Arizona to become a cotton farmer.

List of Detroit Lions starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Lions.

List of Indianapolis Colts starting quarterbacks

The Indianapolis Colts are a professional American football team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. They are currently members of the South Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL).

The club was officially founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1953, as the Baltimore Colts, replacing a previous team of that name that folded in 1950. After 31 seasons in Baltimore, Colts owner Robert Irsay moved the team to Indianapolis.

The Colts have had 33 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Colts' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee Johnny Unitas, as well as the Associated Press National Football League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) winners Earl Morrall and Bert Jones. Unitas also won the MVP award three times in his career. The franchise's first starting quarterback was Fred Enke, who started 9 games in total for the Colts. The Colts' starting quarterback from 1998 to 2011 was 5-time MVP Peyton Manning. The Colts' current starting quarterback is Andrew Luck.

List of UMass Minutemen in the NFL Draft

This is a list of UMass Minutemen football players in the NFL Draft.

Noah Mullins

Noah Walker Mullins (May 23, 1918 – October 31, 1998) was an American football running back, quarterback and defensive back in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Bears and New York Giants. He played college football for the Kentucky Wildcats.

Rodney Peete

Rodney Peete (born March 16, 1966) is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for 16 years. He played college football for the USC Trojans football team. He retired from playing in 2004 and is now in broadcasting.

Steve Bradley (American football)

Steven Carl Bradley (born July 16, 1963) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Bears. He played college football for the Indiana Hoosiers.

Todd Hons

Todd Hank Hons (born September 5, 1961) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League and Arena Football League. He played for the Detroit Lions and Detroit Drive. He played college football for the Arizona State Sun Devils.

UMass Minutemen football statistical leaders

The UMass Minutemen football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the UMass Minutemen football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Minutemen represent the University of Massachusetts Amherst as an Independent in the NCAA.

Although UMass began competing in intercollegiate football in 1879, the school's official record book does not generally include entries from before the 1960s, as records from before this period are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1960s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

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