Greg Gumbel

Greg Gumbel (born May 3, 1946) is an American television sportscaster. He is best known for his various assignments for CBS Sports (most notably, the National Football League, NBA and NCAA basketball). The older brother of news and sportscaster Bryant Gumbel, he became the first African-American (and Creole) announcer to call play-by-play of a major sports championship in the United States when he announced Super Bowl XXXV for the CBS network in 2001. He is of Creole ancestry. Gumbel is currently a play-by-play broadcaster for the NFL on CBS alongside Trent Green as well as the studio host for CBS' men's college basketball coverage.

Greg Gumbel
Greg Gumbel 2005
Gumbel in 2005.
BornMay 3, 1946 (age 73)
Alma materLoras College
OccupationSportscaster
Spouse(s)Marcy Gumbel
ChildrenMichelle
Parent(s)
  • Richard Dunbar Gumbel
  • Rhea Alice LeCesne
Relatives
  • Bryant Gumbel (brother)
  • Renee Gumbel-Farrahi (sister)
  • Rhonda Gumbel-Thomas (sister)
  • Aubrey Drake Gumbel (son)

Biography

Early years

Gumbel was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the first child of parents Richard Gumbel, a judge, and Rhea Alice LeCesne. As a young man, Gumbel grew up on Chicago's South Side, where he attended and graduated from De La Salle Institute. Before becoming a broadcaster, Gumbel graduated with a B.A. degree in English from Loras College in Dubuque, Iowa where he also played on the baseball team. He also has two sisters, Renee Gumbel-Farrahi and Rhonda Gumbel-Thomas.

Career

In 1973, Greg's brother Bryant Gumbel informed him that a Chicago TV station (WMAQ-TV) was auditioning for a sports announcer. At the time, Greg was selling hospital supplies in Detroit. He ultimately got the job and worked there for seven years. The sportscaster he replaced, Dennis Swanson, went on to become president of ABC Sports.

Prior to his rising to prominence at CBS, Gumbel worked for MSG, ESPN, and WFAN radio in New York City. At ESPN, he anchored the show SportsCenter and did "play-by-play" for early NBA games. On MSG, Gumbel served as a backup announcer for Marv Albert on New York Knicks broadcasts as well as providing coverage for college basketball. When MSG signed a huge contract to broadcast New York Yankees games in 1989, Gumbel served as host of the pregame and postgame shows. In addition to his MSG duties, he was the host of the first radio morning show on radio station WFAN.

First CBS stint

Gumbel's CBS career began with part-time work as an NFL announcer in 1988. Also in 1989, Gumbel began announcing college basketball as well. He became host of The NFL Today (alongside Terry Bradshaw) for the 1990 to 1993 seasons. He also anchored CBS' coverage of Major League Baseball, college football, and, in 1999, CBS' coverage for the Daytona 500.

Besides his hosting duties, Gumbel provided play-by-play for the NBA (alongside Quinn Buckner), Major League Baseball including the 1993 American League Championship Series (alongside Jim Kaat), and College World Series baseball.

He was the prime time anchor for the 1994 Winter Olympic Games from Lillehammer, Norway and co-anchor for the weekday morning broadcasts of the 1992 Winter Olympics from Albertville, France.

NBC Sports

Gumbel moved to NBC in 1994 following CBS' losses of the NFL and Major League Baseball broadcasting contracts (Gumbel's last on-air assignment for CBS was providing play-by-play for the College World Series[1]). While at NBC, Gumbel hosted NBC's coverage of the 1994 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. He also did play-by-play for the 1995 Major League Baseball National League Division Series and National League Championship Series (on both occasions, teaming with Joe Morgan), did play-by-play for The NBA on NBC, hosted NBC's daytime coverage of the 1996 Summer Olympics from Atlanta, Georgia, hosted the 1995 World Championships of Figure Skating, and served as the studio host for The NFL on NBC.

Current CBS career

Gumbel left NBC after the network broadcast of Super Bowl XXXII to return to CBS. His first major assignment was to serve as studio host for the network's coverage of college basketball, including the NCAA men's basketball tournament, something he continues to do to this day.

As CBS had just acquired the rights to NBC's previous NFL package, Gumbel joined the broadcast team as the lead announcer with fellow NBC alumnus Phil Simms as his color man. Gumbel was the lead announcer for the NFL on CBS between 1998 and 2003, calling Super Bowls XXXV and XXXVIII. For the 2004 NFL season, Gumbel traded positions with Jim Nantz as host of The NFL Today with Nantz taking over as lead announcer. At the end of the 2005 NFL season, Gumbel was replaced as studio host of The NFL Today by James Brown. Gumbel returned to the broadcast booth as the #2 play-by-play man, replacing Dick Enberg, alongside color man Dan Dierdorf until Dierdorf retired after the 2013–14 NFL season. Gumbel also worked alongside Trent Green in the #3 team as of 2017.

Personal life

Greg, his wife Marcy, brother Bryant, and Greg's married daughter Michelle all reside in the Fort Lauderdale, Florida area.

Politics

In 1999, Gumbel refused to attend a NASCAR banquet honoring Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, on the basis that he disagreed with Thomas' positions on political issues.[2] He has regularly appeared on Howard Stern's radio show.[3] Along similar lines, Gumbel said of Rush Limbaugh, "I find him someone whose words and opinions I can do without."[4]

Legacy

Gumbel is the third man to serve as both host and play-by-play announcer for Super Bowls (the first two were Dick Enberg and Al Michaels respectively). He hosted Super Bowls XXVI, XXX, and XXXII before calling Super Bowls XXXV and XXXVIII. Jim Nantz became the fourth man to do so after he called Super Bowl XLI for CBS.

During his tenure as the chief anchor of The NFL Today, he served alongside co-anchors Dan Marino, Shannon Sharpe, and Boomer Esiason. The group was known to call him by his nickname "Gumby".

Career timeline

External links

References

  1. ^ Nidetz, Steve (June 10, 1994). "Greg Gumbel Finds Saying Farewell Can Be Painful". Chicago Tribune.
  2. ^ El-Bashir, Tarik (February 15, 1999). "AUTO RACING: NOTEBOOK; Restrictor-Plate Races Are Still Martin's Bane". The New York Times.
  3. ^ Pergament, Alan (February 19, 1994). "CBS GETTING HIGH MARKS FOR RATINGS, INTERPRETATION". Buffalo News.
  4. ^ Shister, Gail (May 24, 2000). "Is football making a pass at Limbaugh or just fumbling?". The Philadelphia Inquirer.
Preceded by
Brent Musburger
Jim Nantz
The NFL Today host
19901993
20042005
Succeeded by
Jim Nantz
James Brown
Preceded by
Tim McCarver and Paula Zahn
American television prime time anchor, Winter Olympic Games
1994
Succeeded by
Jim Nantz
Preceded by
Jim Lampley
Studio host, NFL on NBC
19941997
Succeeded by
Bob Costas
Preceded by
Bob Costas, Dick Enberg, Gayle Gardner and Hannah Storm
American television daytime anchor, Summer Olympic Games
1996
Succeeded by
Hannah Storm
Preceded by
Pat Summerall
Lead play-by-play announcer, NFL on CBS
19982003
Succeeded by
Jim Nantz
Preceded by
Pat O'Brien
Studio Host, College Basketball on CBS
1998–present
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Dick Enberg
#2 play-by-play announcer, NFL on CBS
2006–2013
Succeeded by
Ian Eagle
Preceded by
Dick Enberg
Super Bowl television play-by-play announcer (AFC package carrier)
2000-2003
Succeeded by
Jim Nantz
Preceded by
Bob Costas (in 1989)
#2 play-by-play announcer, Major League Baseball on NBC
1995
Succeeded by
Last
CBS Sports

CBS Sports is the sports division of the American television network CBS. Its headquarters are in the CBS Building on West 52nd Street in midtown Manhattan, New York City, with programs produced out of Studio 43 at the CBS Broadcast Center on West 57th Street.

Its premier sports properties are the NFL, Southeastern Conference (SEC) football, NCAA basketball (including telecasts of the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament), and PGA Tour golf, including The Masters and the PGA Championship.

The online arm of CBS Sports is CBSSports.com. CBS purchased SportsLine.com in 2004, and today CBSSports.com is part of CBS Interactive. On February 26, 2018, following up on the success of their online news network CBSN, CBS Sports launched CBS Sports HQ, a 24/7, online only, linear sports news network. The network focuses entirely on sports news, results, highlights and analysis. (CBS Sports college sports and golf programming that it distributes over the air is generally made available for free via separate streams, as are a limited number of NFL national telecasts; the remainder requires a CBS All Access subscription to be viewed online, with CBS Sports Network programming requiring a TV Everywhere subscription.)

CBS Sports was honored at the 59th Annual Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Advanced Media Technology for Synchronous Enhancement of Original Television Content for Interactive Use for its program March Madness on Demand.

On August 31, 2013, CBS Sports rolled out its previous graphics and animation package that was first used in the network's coverage of Super Bowl XLVII. Additionally, in compliance with the Active Format Description #10 code, CBS Sports switched to a 16:9 aspect ratio letterbox presentation used for all sports programming, including the SEC on CBS and the NFL on CBS broadcasts.

On November 30, 2015, CBS Sports released a new logo in order to coincide with the network's coverage of Super Bowl 50. The network also created a new on-air graphics package that debuted as part of the network's Super Bowl week programming. Following the game, the graphics package began to be utilized across all of their programming events, including their joint production of NCAA March Madness with Turner Sports. The Masters, which retains heavy production control over their event, continued to use the network's older graphical style originally unveiled in 2007 until 2019, when they debuted a new graphics package. Also, the network's Thursday Night Football game broadcasts continued to use the graphical style originally used since its debut in 2014 until its rights to that package expired in 2018.

Chet Simmons

Chester Robert "Chet" Simmons (July 11, 1928 – March 25, 2010) was a television executive. He worked at ABC Sports, NBC Sports and ESPN, and was the first Commissioner of the USFL. From 1957 to 1964, he helped build ABC Sports into a leader in sports programming and was a key part of the development of Wide World of Sports. He joined NBC Sports in 1964 where he stayed for 15 years becoming the first President in 1977. At NBC, he pioneered instant replay and coverage of the Olympics and NCAA Men's Basketball Final Four. In 1979, he left NBC to join the soon to launch ESPN becoming its second President. At ESPN, he oversaw the launch of the Network, the development of SportsCenter, the first broadcasts of the NFL Draft, coverage of the early rounds of the NCAA Men's Basketball Final Four and the development of Chris Berman, Bob Ley, George Grande, Greg Gumbel and Dick Vitale. In 1982, he became the first Commissioner of the United States Football League and led it through three Championships and players including Herschel Walker, Jim Kelly, Reggie White, Steve Young and Anthony Carter.

He is the 2005 recipient of the Sports Emmy Lifetime Achievement Award and a member of the University of Alabama College of Communications and Information Sciences Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 2010.

College World Series on CBS

From 1988-2002, CBS Sports televised a portion of the annual College World Series.

Gumbel

Gumbel or Gumble is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Bryant Gumbel (born 1948), American television sportscaster, brother of Greg

David Heinz Gumbel (1906–1992), Israeli designer and silversmith

Emil Julius Gumbel (1891–1966), German mathematician, pacifist and anti-Nazi campaigner

creator of Gumbel distribution

Greg Gumbel (born 1946), American television sportscaster, brother of Bryant

Nicky Gumbel (born 1955), Anglican priest and author

Thomas Gumble (died 1676), English biographer

Wilhelm Theodor Gumbel (1812–1858), German bryologist

Wilhelm von Gumbel (1823–1898), German geologist

Jim Nantz

James William Nantz III (born May 17, 1959) is an American sportscaster who has worked on telecasts of the National Football League (NFL), National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's basketball, and the PGA Tour for CBS Sports since the 1980s. He has anchored CBS' coverage of the Masters Tournament since 1989 and been the play-by-play announcer on CBS' top NFL game since 2004.

List of AFC Championship Game broadcasters

The following is a list of the television and radio networks and announcers who have broadcast the American Football Conference Championship Game throughout the years. The years listed concentrate on the season instead of the calendar year that the game took place. The forerunner to the AFC Championship Game (prior to the 1970 AFL–NFL merger) was the AFL Championship Game.

List of American Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers to have broadcast the American Bowl, which was a series of National Football League pre-season exhibition games that were held at sites outside the United States between 1986 and 2005. Out of the list, ESPN hosted the America Bowl the largest number of times, with NBC coming second.

List of College World Series broadcasters

Through 1987, the College World Series was a pure double-elimination event. The format was changed in 1988, when the tournament was divided into two four-team double-elimination brackets, with the survivors of each bracket playing in a single championship game. The single-game championship was designed for network television, with the final game on CBS on Saturday afternoon.

In 2003, the tournament returned entirely to cable television on ESPN, which had been covering all of the other games of the CWS since 1982 (and a partial schedule since 1980). The championship final became a best-of-three series between the two bracket winners, with games scheduled for Saturday, Sunday, and Monday evenings. In the results shown here, Score indicates the score of the championship game(s) only.

The following is a list of the American television networks and announcers that have broadcast the College World Series.

List of NFC Championship Game broadcasters

The following is a list of the television and radio networks and announcers who have broadcast the National Football Conference Championship Game throughout the years. The years listed concentrate on the season instead of the calendar year that the game took place. The forerunner to the NFC Championship Game (prior to the 1970 AFL–NFL merger) was the NFL Championship Game.

List of NFL on CBS commentator pairings

CBS Sports began televising National Football League games in 1956. The network inherited the rights to games of most of the teams from the defunct DuMont Television Network; back then, each NFL team negotiated its own television deal. From 1956 to 1967, CBS assigned their commentating crews to one team each for the entire season. Beginning in 1968, CBS instituted a semi-merit system for their commentating crews. Following the 1993 season, there was no NFL on CBS after the network lost its half of the Sunday afternoon TV package (the National Football Conference) to the Fox Broadcasting Company. However, CBS gained the American Football Conference package from NBC beginning in 1998. The names of the play-by-play men are listed first while the color commentators are listed second; sideline reporters, when used, are listed last.

List of Super Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of Super Bowl broadcasters, that is, all of the national American television and radio networks and sports announcers that have broadcast the first four AFL-NFL World Championship Games and thereafter the championship games of the National Football League. It does not include any announcers who may have appeared on local radio broadcasts produced by the participating teams.

Originally alternated between the AFL's broadcaster (then NBC) and the NFL's broadcaster (then CBS), the game is now alternated between the three main broadcast television rightsholders of the NFL—CBS, Fox and NBC. CBS has televised the most Super Bowl games, with Super Bowl LIII as its 20th.

NBC originally had broadcasting rights for the Super Bowl XXVI and CBS for the XXVII, but the NFL allowed the networks to switch the two games in order to allow CBS a significant lead-in to its coverage of the 1992 Winter Olympics. Likewise, NBC was to air the Super Bowl LV and CBS for the LVI, but they agreed to swap the broadcasting rights, therefore CBS will benefit from holding rights to the Super Bowl and the 2021 NCAA Final Four, whereas NBC will be abled to pair its Super Bowl coverage with the 2022 Winter Olympics.

MSG, NY

MSG, NY is a television newscast that airs on MSG Network. It airs nightly at about 10 or 10:30 p.m. Eastern time, with the exact time dependent on sports events schedules. Jason Horowitz, Deb Placey, and Tina Cervasio serve as hosts.

Originally, this program was called SportsDesk and was a sportscast similar to ESPN's SportsCenter. In 2006, the show was retooled and now primarily covers both sports and entertainment events that occur at Madison Square Garden.

Past anchors of SportsDesk include Al Trautwig, Greg Gumbel, Marv Albert, Jonathan Coachman, and Bill Daughtry.

SportsDesk was also seen on the North American Sports Network throughout Europe.

Outstanding Sports Personality, Studio Host

The Sports Emmy Award for Outstanding Sports Personality, Studio Host has been awarded since 1993. The award is given to an on-air personality that hosts a pregame or postgame show, or gives news during event coverage, but does not commentate on the event itself. This award is considered to be the most prestigious of all given under the Outstanding Sports Personality category. Before this subcategory was set up, an award was given to either a studio host or an event commentator from 1968 to 1992. See that article for a list of winners (Outstanding Host or Commentator).

The NFL Today

The NFL Today is also the name of the radio show that corresponds with the television show.The NFL Today is an American sports television program on CBS that serves as the pre-game show for the network's National Football League (NFL) game telecasts under the NFL on CBS brand. The program features commentary on the latest news around the NFL from its hosts and studio analysts, as well as predictions for the day's games and interviews with players and coaches. Originally debuting as Pro Football Kickoff on September 17, 1961, the program airs before all NFL games broadcast by CBS (usually on Sundays at 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time), and generally runs for one hour (except for Thursday prime time games during the first half of the season, during which a 45-minute edition airs, as well as on Thanksgiving and during the postseason).

The NFL Today broadcasts from Studio 43 at the CBS Broadcast Center in New York City; however, if CBS is only scheduled to air a single game that day, the program broadcasts from the game site for the Conference Championship games, Saturday night playoff games, and the Super Bowl.

As of 2018, the primary hosts for The NFL Today are longtime sportscaster James Brown and former Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Bill Cowher. Former New York Giants quarterback Phil Simms, former Seattle Seahawks, Minnesota Vikings, and Detroit Lions wide receiver Nate Burleson, and former Cincinnati Bengals, New York Jets, and Arizona Cardinals quarterback Boomer Esiason serve as analysts. The program's commentators also provide commentary during game updates, the Verizon Halftime Report and the State Farm Postgame Show on the NFL on CBS broadcasts.

From 2014 to 2017, CBS entered a partnership with the NFL Network, the NFL GameDay crew has appeared in segments on The NFL Today for both Thursdays and Sundays (and Saturdays when applicable).

As of 2014, the program's primary presenting sponsor is Southwest Airlines. However, Microsoft serves as the sponsor of the final segment, First on the Field, which is seen on the telecasts.

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