Greg Colbrunn

Gregory Joseph Colbrunn (born July 26, 1969) is an American former Major League baseball player and hitting coach. Primarily a first baseman during his active career, the Fontana, California, native played in the Major Leagues for 13 seasons (1992–2004) and seven different teams. He threw and batted right-handed and was listed at 6 feet (1.8 m) tall and 190 pounds (86 kg). He served as the Boston Red Sox hitting coach during the 2013 and 2014 seasons.

Colbrunn graduated from Fontana High School and was selected by the Montreal Expos in the sixth round of the 1987 Major League Baseball draft, turning down a scholarship from Stanford University to begin his professional baseball career.[1] Despite missing the entire 1991 season with an injury, he rose through the Montreal farm system and made his MLB debut with the Expos on July 9, 1992, and singled in his first at bat off Francisco Oliveras of the San Francisco Giants.[2]

Greg Colbrunn
First baseman
Born: July 26, 1969 (age 49)
Fontana, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 9, 1992, for the Montreal Expos
Last MLB appearance
June 28, 2004, for the Arizona Diamondbacks
MLB statistics
Batting average.289
Home runs98
Runs batted in422
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Playing career

After his debut with Montreal, Colbrunn would also play for the Florida Marlins, Minnesota Twins, Colorado Rockies, Atlanta Braves, Arizona Diamondbacks and Seattle Mariners. He batted over .300 five times during his Major League career, and had his most successful seasons with the Marlins and Diamondbacks, exceeding the 100-games played mark in 1995, 1996 and 2000. He set personal bests in home runs (23) and runs batted in (89) for the 1995 Marlins, and amassed 146 hits for the Marlins in both 1995 and 1996. He batted .310 in 334 career games with the D-Backs, with a career-high .333 mark during part-time duty in 2002. He hit for the cycle on September 18, 2002, against the San Diego Padres.[3]

Colbrunn was part of the Diamondbacks' victorious 2001 World Series team, starting at first base in Game 6 and collecting two singles in five at bats, with a base on balls, two runs scored and one RBI, in Arizona's 15–2 thrashing of the New York Yankees.

In his 13-season MLB career, Colbrunn batted .289; his 801 career hits included 155 doubles, 12 triples and 98 homers.

Batting coach

After his playing career ended in 2005, Colbrunn became a coach in the Yankees' organization, serving as the hitting instructor for the Charleston RiverDogs of the Single-A South Atlantic League from 2007–09 and in 2011–12.[4] In 2010, Colbrunn managed the RiverDogs to a 65–74 (.468) record.[5]

Then, following the 2012 season, Colbrunn joined the coaching staff of new Red Sox manager John Farrell as primary batting instructor. Under his guidance, the 2013 Red Sox led the Major Leagues in runs scored (853), runs per game (5.27), slugging percentage (.446), on-base percentage (.349), on-base plus slugging (.795), total bases (2,521) and extra-base hits (570).[1] The Red Sox won the American League East Division title, the American League pennant and the 2013 World Series.

Colbrunn returned to Farrell's staff for 2014. On June 4, he was compelled to take a medical leave of absence after he suffered a cerebral hemorrhage during the Red Sox' road trip to Cleveland, Ohio, and was hospitalized in the Cleveland Clinic.[6] He returned to his duties on a part-time basis on June 30.[7] However, the 2014 Red Sox struggled offensively all season long, finishing at or near the bottom of the American League in almost every category, including runs scored (12th, with 634).[8] After the 2014 season concluded, Colbrunn stepped down from his position with the Red Sox and declined another assignment within the organization.[8]

Colbrunn, a resident of nearby Mount Pleasant, South Carolina,[1] then returned to the Yankees' organization and the Charleston RiverDogs as their batting coach for 2015–16.[9] In 2017, the Yankees promoted him to roving minor league hitting coordinator, but he returned to being the hitting coach for the 2019 Charleston team, in order to be closer to his family. [10]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c 2014 Boston Red Sox Media Guide biography
  2. ^ 1992-7-9 box score from Retrosheet
  3. ^ 2002-9-18 box score from Retrosheet
  4. ^ RiverDogs official website
  5. ^ Baseball Reference (minors)
  6. ^ Masslive.com
  7. ^ "Red Sox hitting coach Colbrunn rejoins team". ESPN.com. Associated Press. June 30, 2014. Retrieved July 1, 2014.
  8. ^ a b ESPN.com 2014.10.03
  9. ^ New York Daily News
  10. ^ http://riveraveblues.com/2019/02/yankees-announce-2019-minor-league-coaching-staffs-183346/

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
Craig Biggio
Hitting for the cycle
September 18, 2002
Succeeded by
Brad Wilkerson
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Dave Magadan
Boston Red Sox hitting coach
2013–2014
Succeeded by
Chili Davis
1994 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 1994 season was the 2nd season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1993. Their manager was Rene Lachemann. They played home games at Joe Robbie Stadium. They finished with a record of 51-64, last in the National League East. The season ended early as a result of the 1994 players strike.

1995 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 1995 season was the 3rd season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1994. Their manager was Rene Lachemann. They played home games at Joe Robbie Stadium. They finished with a record of 67–76, fourth in the National League East. The Marlins scored 673 runs and allowed 673 runs to finish with a run differential of zero.

1997 Atlanta Braves season

The 1997 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 32nd season in Atlanta and 127th overall. The Braves won their sixth consecutive division title, taking the National League East title by 9 games over the second place Florida Marlins. However, the Marlins would later defeat the Braves in the 1997 National League Championship Series. 1997 was the first year that the Braves played their home games in Turner Field, which originally served as a venue for the 1996 Summer Olympics.

1997 Major League Baseball expansion draft

The 1997 Major League Baseball expansion draft was conducted by Major League Baseball (MLB) on November 18, 1997, in the Phoenix Civic Center to stock the major league rosters of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays and Arizona Diamondbacks, new major league expansion franchises that were set to start play in the 1998 season. Tampa Bay joined the American League (AL) East division, displacing the Detroit Tigers (who moved to the AL Central division, thus displacing the Milwaukee Brewers, who moved to the National League (NL) Central division, and Arizona joined the NL West division.

1997 Minnesota Twins season

The 1997 Minnesota Twins will not be remembered as the strongest team the Twins ever fielded. Manager Tom Kelly's team consisted of a few solid players, but mainly past-their-prime veterans and never-to-be-established prospects. One of the few bright spots was pitcher Brad Radke's breakout season, in which he won 20 games, at one point had 12 consecutive victories, tying a record Scott Erickson set in 1991. The team finished with a 68-94 record, good enough for fourth place in what proved to be the league's weakest division that season. The Cleveland Indians, who won the division that year, made it all the way to the World Series, but lost in seven games to the Florida Marlins.

1999 Arizona Diamondbacks season

The 1999 Arizona Diamondbacks looked to improve on their 1998 expansion season. They looked to contend in what was a strong National League West Division. They finished the season with a highly surprising record of 100-62, good enough for the NL West division title. In the NLDS, however, they fell in four games to the New York Mets on Todd Pratt's infamous home run. Randy Johnson would win the NL Cy Young Award and become the third pitcher to win the Cy Young Award in both leagues.

1999 National League Division Series

The 1999 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 1999 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 5, and ended on Saturday, October 9, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 103–59) vs. (3) Houston Astros (Central Division champion, 97–65): Braves win series, 3–1.

(2) Arizona Diamondbacks (Western Division champion, 100–62) vs. (4) New York Mets (Wild Card, 97–66): Mets win series, 3–1.The higher seed (in parentheses) possessed home field advantage (Games 1, 2 and 5 at home), which was determined by playing record. Although the team with the best record was normally scheduled to host the wild card team, teams in the same division cannot play against each other until the championship series round. The Braves played the Astros, rather than the wild card Mets. The Mets clinched the wild card spot through a one-game playoff with the Cincinnati Reds, winning 5–0 on October 4.

The Diamondbacks were participating in the postseason in only their second year of existence, the fastest any expansion team had ever qualified. The Atlanta Braves and New York Mets went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Braves became the National League champion, and were defeated by the American League champion New York Yankees in the 1999 World Series.

2001 National League Division Series

The 2001 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 2001 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 9, and ended on Sunday, October 14, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) Houston Astros (Central Division champion, 93–69) vs. (3) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 88–74): Braves win series, 3–0.

(2) Arizona Diamondbacks (Western Division champion, 92–70) vs. (4) St. Louis Cardinals (Wild Card, 93–69): Diamondbacks win series, 3–2.The higher seed (in parentheses) had the home field advantage (Games 1, 2 and 5 at home), which was determined by playing record. Houston and St. Louis tied for the Central Division title, but Houston was awarded the division winner's playoff-seeding over St. Louis due to their 9–7 advantage in head-to-head play. Officially the two clubs were co-champions. Although the team with the best record was normally intended to play the wild card team, the Astros played the Braves, rather than the wild card Cardinals, because the Astros and Cardinals were in the same division.

The Diamondbacks and Braves went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Diamondbacks became the National League champion, and defeated the American League champion New York Yankees in the 2001 World Series.

2002 Arizona Diamondbacks season

The 2002 Arizona Diamondbacks looked to repeat as World Series champions. They looked to contend in what was once again a strong National League West Division. They finished the season with a record of 98-64, good enough for the division title. Randy Johnson would finish the season as the NL Cy Young Award winner and become the second pitcher to win five Cy Young Awards.

2003 Major League Baseball draft

The 2003 First-Year Player Draft, Major League Baseball's annual amateur draft, was held on June 3 and 4. It was conducted via conference call with representatives from each of the league's 30 teams.

Source: MLB.com 2003 Draft Tracker

2004 Arizona Diamondbacks season

The 2004 Arizona Diamondbacks looked to improve on their 84–78 record from 2003. The Diamondsbacks hoped to contend for a postseason berth in what was a weaker National League West than in years past, but finished the season with a record of 51–111, in last place in the division and the worst record by any National League team since the 1965 Mets won one fewer game. The one highlight of a disastrous season was when Randy Johnson pitched a perfect game on May 18, 2004.

Arizona Diamondbacks

The Arizona Diamondbacks, often shortened as the D-backs, are an American professional baseball team based in Phoenix, Arizona. The club competes in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member of the National League (NL) West division. The team has played every home game in franchise history at Chase Field, formerly known as Bank One Ballpark. The Diamondbacks have won one World Series championship (defeating the New York Yankees in 2001) – becoming the fastest expansion team in the Major Leagues to win a championship, which it did in only the fourth season since the franchise's inception. They remain the only major league men's sports team from Arizona to have won a championship title.

Arizona Diamondbacks all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of May 10, 2016.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have played in at least in one game for the Arizona Diamondbacks franchise.

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Colorado Rockies all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of December 31, 2014.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Colorado Rockies franchise.

Fontana High School

Fontana High School (FOHI) is a secondary public school in Fontana, California in the Fontana Unified School District. Fontana High serves grades 9 through 12.

Marteese Robinson

Marteese Robinson (born April 17, 1966) was a college baseball player who played professionally, but never reached the major leagues.

Robinson attended Seton Hall Prep and then Seton Hall University. He hit .394/.453/.596 with the club in 1985 and .529/.564/.857 with 16 home runs and 90 RBI, 89 runs and 58 stolen bases in 55 games for the college team in 1987. He was the top hitter in NCAA Division I baseball that season, putting forth "one of the finest individual seasons in college baseball history." His .529 mark at the time was the second-highest in NCAA history, trailing Keith Hagman's .551 in 1980. With Robin Ventura, he won the Collegiate Baseball Newspaper Collegiate Baseball Player of the Year honor. He also earned a consensus All-American selection at first base and was named Big East Conference Player of the Year.He was drafted by the Oakland Athletics in the sixth round of the 1987 Major League Baseball Draft, between infielders Dave Hollins and Greg Colbrunn, and began his professional career that year. He played in their organization until 1990, though never reached above Double-A. In 388 career games, he hit .266 with 24 home runs and 39 stolen bases. He was the first Collegiate Baseball Player of the Year to not reach the majors and the last until Lloyd Peever, who earned the honor in 1992.

He was profiled extensively in the 2002 book The Hit Men and the Kid Who Batted Ninth: Biggio, Valentin, Vaughn & Robinson: Together Again in the Big Leagues by David Siroty.He later worked as a scout for the St. Louis Cardinals, Washington Nationals and Toronto Blue Jays.

Miami Marlins

The Miami Marlins are an American professional baseball team based in Miami, Florida. They compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. Their home park is Marlins Park. Though one of only two MLB franchises to have never won a division title (the other is the Colorado Rockies), the Marlins have won two World Series championships as a wild card team.

The team began play as an expansion team in the 1993 season as the Florida Marlins and played home games from their inaugural season to the 2012 season at what was originally called Joe Robbie Stadium, which they shared with the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). Since the 2012 season, they have played at Marlins Park in downtown Miami, on the site of the former Orange Bowl. The new park, unlike their previous home (which was criticized in its baseball configuration for poor sight lines in some locations), was designed foremost as a baseball park. Per an agreement with the city and Miami-Dade County (which owns the park), the Marlins officially changed their name to the "Miami Marlins" on November 11, 2011. They also adopted a new logo, color scheme, and uniforms.The Marlins have the distinction of winning a World Series championship in both seasons they qualified for the postseason, doing so in 1997 and 2003—both times as the National League wild card team. They defeated the American League (AL) champion Cleveland Indians in the 1997 World Series, with shortstop Édgar Rentería driving in second baseman Craig Counsell for the series-clinching run in the 11th inning of the seventh and deciding game. In the 2003 season, manager Jeff Torborg was fired after 38 games. The Marlins were in last place in the NL East with a 16–22 record at the time. Torborg's successor, 72-year-old Jack McKeon, led them to the NL wild card berth in the postseason; they defeated the New York Yankees four games to two in the 2003 World Series.

Miami Marlins all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Miami Marlins franchise, known as the Florida Marlins from their inception in 1993 through the 2011 season.

Players in bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Tim Hyers

Timothy James Hyers (born October 3, 1971 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American professional baseball hitting coach and a former Major League Baseball (MLB) first baseman who played for the San Diego Padres (1994–95), Detroit Tigers (1996) and Florida Marlins (1999).

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