Greenville, Ohio

Greenville is a city in and the county seat[7] of Darke County, Ohio, United States, located in southwestern Ohio about 33 miles northwest of Dayton. The population was 13,227 at the 2010 census.

Greenville, Ohio
Intersection of Washington, Martin and Broadway in Greenville
Intersection of Washington, Martin and Broadway in Greenville
Nickname(s): 
"The Treaty City"
Location in Darke County and the state of Ohio.
Location in Darke County and the state of Ohio.
Coordinates: 40°6′9″N 84°37′41″W / 40.10250°N 84.62806°WCoordinates: 40°6′9″N 84°37′41″W / 40.10250°N 84.62806°W
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyDarke
Government
 • MayorSteve Willman[1]
Area
 • Total6.66 sq mi (17.25 km2)
 • Land6.60 sq mi (17.09 km2)
 • Water0.06 sq mi (0.16 km2)
Elevation1,043 ft (318 m)
Population
 • Total13,227
 • Estimate 
(2012[5])
13,105
 • Density2,004.1/sq mi (773.8/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
45331
Area code(s)937
FIPS code39-32340[6]
GNIS feature ID1064762[3]
Websitehttp://www.cityofgreenville.org/

History

Greenville is the historic location of Fort Greene Ville, which was built in Nov. 1793 by General Anthony Wayne's Legion of the United States during the Northwest Indian War. Named for Revolutionary War hero Nathaniel Greene, its defenses covered about 55 acres (220,000 m2), which made it the largest wooden fort in North America. The fort was a training ground and base of operations for the ~3000 soldiers of the Legion and Kentucky Milia prior to their march northward in Aug. 1794 to the Battle of Fallen Timbers. A year after the battle, the Treaty of Greenville was signed at the fort on August 3, 1795, bringing an end to the Indian wars in the area and opening the Northwest Territory for settlement.[8] Fort Greenville was abandoned in 1796, and partly burned later that year to retrieve nails used in its construction. Some of its logs were carried away to be reused in the newly emergent settlement of Dayton to the south. In the War of 1812, what remained was refitted, and used as a supply depot and staging area. The earliest European settlers were in 1807; the city of Greenville was officially founded in August 1808.

Geography

Greenville is located at 40°6′9″N 84°37′41″W / 40.10250°N 84.62806°W (40.102474, -84.627985).[9]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.66 square miles (17.25 km2), of which 6.60 square miles (17.09 km2) is land and 0.06 square miles (0.16 km2) is water.[2]

Local airports include Darke County Airport, seven miles away in Versailles and James M. Cox Dayton International Airport 35 miles away in Vandalia.

General information

Greenville is home to The Great Darke County Fair which runs for nine days in August. Greenville is also home to KitchenAid small appliances.

Built in 1849, the historic Bear's Mill is an authentic example of a stonegrinding flour mill of its time. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977, it is still in use today to grind cornmeal, whole wheat flour, rye flour, and pancake mixes. The mill and the buhr stones are powered by water. Self-guided tours may be taken during regular business hours.

Greenville has a local history museum, the Garst Museum, which features the most extensive known collections of memorabilia of Annie Oakley and Lowell Thomas, both of whom were born nearby. It also holds historical artifacts relating to Anthony Wayne and the Treaty of Greenville as well as Native American artifacts. The museum also includes a village of shops; a wing of early American furnishings, pioneer life, and military uniforms; an early Indianapolis 500 race car built in Greenville; and an extensive genealogy room for research. Also located in Greenville is St. Clair Memorial Hall, the center for the arts in Darke County. This piece of architecture, built in 1910, has been completely remodeled and is a showpiece for all of Darke County.

The city and surrounding areas are served by a daily newspaper published in Greenville, The Daily Advocate.

Notable companies

Various companies and brands such as KitchenAid, FRAM Group, and BASF North America have offices in Greenville.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840793
18501,04531.8%
18601,65057.9%
18702,52052.7%
18803,53540.3%
18905,47354.8%
19005,5010.5%
19106,23713.4%
19207,10413.9%
19307,036−1.0%
19407,74510.1%
19508,85914.4%
196010,58519.5%
197012,38017.0%
198013,0025.0%
199012,863−1.1%
200013,2943.4%
201013,227−0.5%
Est. 201712,771[10]−3.4%
Sources:[6][11][12][13]

2010 census

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 13,227 people, 5,933 households, and 3,430 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,004.1 inhabitants per square mile (773.8/km2). There were 6,536 housing units at an average density of 990.3 per square mile (382.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.7% White, 0.9% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

There were 5,933 households of which 26.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.2% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 42.2% were non-families. 37.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 19.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.17, and the average family size was 2.83.

The median age in the city was 43.4 years. 21.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.8% were from 25 to 44; 25.6% were from 45 to 64, and 22.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.0% male and 54.0% female.

2000 census

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 13,294 people, 5,649 households, and 3,462 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,206.4 people per square mile (851.2/km²). There were 6,030 housing units at an average density of 1,000.8 per square mile (386.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.31% White, 0.56% African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.44% from other races, and 0.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.14% of the population.

There were 5,649 households out of which 27.3% had children living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.7% were non-families. 34.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23, and the average family size was 2.85.

In the city, the population was spread out with 22.7% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 20.9% from 45 to 64, and 22.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 84.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,791, and the median income for a family was $38,699. Males had a median income of $33,143 versus $24,875 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,830. About 10.2% of families and 13.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.8% of those under age 18 and 14.6% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "Greenville's Newest Mayor Takes Oath". The Early Bird. Retrieved 2016-09-21.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  3. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  5. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-06-17. Retrieved 2013-06-17.
  6. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  8. ^ Greenville - Ohio History Central - A product of the Ohio Historical Society
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  10. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 26, 2018.
  11. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  12. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  13. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 17 June 2013. Retrieved 25 November 2013.

External links

Benjamin Franklin Coppess House

The Benjamin Franklin Coppess House, built in 1882, is a historic Queen Anne and Stick-Eastlake style house located at 209 Washington Street in Greenville, Ohio, United States.

Broadway Bridge (Greenville, Ohio)

The Broadway Bridge is a historic arch bridge that spans Greenville Creek on the edge of downtown Greenville, a city in the far western part of the U.S. state of Ohio. Constructed in the early twentieth century, it carries one of the city's most important streets and connects the city's northern and southern sections. One of several large concrete bridges designed by a Cleveland engineer, it has been named a historic site.

Clement Laird Brumbaugh

Clement Laird Brumbaugh (February 28, 1863 – September 28, 1921) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Darke County, Ohio

Darke County is a county in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 52,959. Its county seat is Greenville. The county was created in 1809 and later organized in 1817. It is named for William Darke, an officer in the American Revolutionary War.Darke County comprises the Greenville, OH Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Dayton-Springfield-Sidney, OH Combined Statistical Area.

Notable county residents include Annie Oakley, famed 19th-century markswoman who performed with Buffalo Bill's Wild West show, who was born in Darke County, as was Lucullus Virgil McWhorter, a farmer and frontiersman who studied and wrote about the historical American Indian tribes of West Virginia and Ohio. After moving to Yakima, Washington, in 1903, he documented and became an advocate for the contemporary Yakama and Nez Perce peoples, and collected their oral histories. The travel author and broadcaster Lowell Thomas was born in Darke County.

Darke County Courthouse, Sheriff's House and Jail

The Darke County Courthouse, Sheriff's House and Jail are three historic buildings located at 504 South Broadway just south of West 4th Street in Greenville, Ohio. On December 12, 1976, the three buildings of the present courthouse complex were added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Donovan Robeson House

The Donovan Robeson House is a historic house in Greenville, Ohio, United States. Located along Fourth Street west of downtown, the Robeson House has been ranked as the city's most significant Queen Anne mansion.

East Greenville, Ohio

East Greenville is an unincorporated community in Stark County, in the U.S. state of Ohio.

Garst Museum

The Garst House, also known as the Garst Museum, is an historic building located at 205 North Broadway in Greenville, Ohio, United States. On November 16, 1977, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places

Today it is a local history museum operated by the Darke County Historical Society.

Greenville Mausoleum

The Greenville Mausoleum is an imposing Egyptian Revival structure in Greenville, Ohio, United States. Built in 1913, this historic mausoleum is built of concrete covered with courses of limestone, resting on a foundation of granite and covered with a roof of ceramic tiles. Among its most distinctive elements are the marble pillars, topped with capitals of the Doric order, that line the main entrance. The main portion of the interior, built in a basilican style with multiple aisles, contains approximately four hundred concrete and marble crypts, and the building's wings house individual family crypts. It is lit by twelve clerestory windows under the roofline.

Located along West Street adjacent to the cemetery's main entrance, the mausoleum was the brainchild of local doctor J.P. Collett. He chose a unique design for the structure: no other Egyptian Revival mausolea have been built near Greenville. Most historic cemetery buildings in western Ohio employed other styles of architecture; for example, the mausoleum in Fostoria and the Woodland Cemetery offices in Dayton were built in the Neoclassical and Romanesque Revival styles respectively. In recognition of its distinctive architecture, the mausoleum was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976, being the fourth Darke County site to receive this recognition.

Harvey C. Garber

Harvey Cable Garber (July 6, 1866 – March 23, 1938) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Harvey C. Garber was born in Hill Grove, Ohio on July 6, 1866. Garber moved to Greenville, Ohio, with his parents in 1872, where he attended public schools. He was later Manager of the Western Union Telegraph Co., and was Superintendent of the Central Union Telephone Co. for Ohio. He served four years as assistant general solicitor.

Garber served as member of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1890 to 1893. He served as chairman of the Democratic State committee in 1901 and chairman of the Democratic State executive committee from 1902 to 1908.

Garber was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-eighth in 1902 and Fifty-ninth Congress in 1904. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1906.

Garber moved to Columbus, Ohio, in 1910 and served as assistant to the president of the Bell Telephone Co. in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois from 1910 to 1915. Garber also studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1921 and commenced practice in Columbus, Ohio.

Garber died at his winter home in Naples, Florida, March 23, 1938. He was interred in Greenville Cemetery, Greenville, Ohio.

Lansdowne House (Greenville, Ohio)

The Lansdowne House is a historic house in Greenville, Ohio, United States. Built in 1870, it was the residence of Zachary Lansdowne, who was a pioneer in the development of the U.S. Navy's airship program and commanded the airship Shenandoah. A native of Greenville, Lansdowne attended the United States Naval Academy upon graduating from Greenville High School; as Shenandoah's skipper, he was killed in its crash on September 3, 1925.Architecturally, the Lansdowne House is unremarkable. It is a simple two-story rectangular frame structure, topped with a shingled roof and supported by a foundation of limestone.In 1979, the Lansdowne House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It qualified to be added to the Register because of its connection to Zachary Lansdowne.

Leftwich House

The Leftwich House is a historic house in Greenville, Ohio, United States. Built in 1875, the house features a combination of the Italianate and Stick-Eastlake styles. A frame structure built upon a foundation of stone, it is one of the most well-preserved Stick-Eastlake houses in Greenville and the surrounding area, with a porch that has been described as "outstanding" and a gable that is ornamented by specifically Stick elements.The house's floor plan is unusual; its four-bay western facade is divided between two components of two bays each; through the northern component, one may enter the house through a Victorian front door. An Eastlake porch shelters the rear door that opens onto the protruding kitchen, and various eaves elsewhere on the exterior form separate cornices, each of which is composed of brackets and a frieze. Covering the house is a hip roof, which consists primarily of shingles.In 1975, the Leftwich House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places because of its excellent architecture. Although the house's history included no distinctive events or residents, its architecture was rare enough to qualify it for listing.

Matt Light

Matthew Charles "Matt" Light (born June 23, 1978) is a former American football offensive tackle who spent his entire eleven-year career playing for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Purdue University. He was picked by the Patriots in the second round of the 2001 NFL Draft.

Paul Norris

Paul Leroy Norris (April 28, 1914 – November 5, 2007) was an American comic book artist best known as co-creator of the DC Comics superhero Aquaman, and for a 35-year run as artist of the newspaper comic strip Brick Bradford.

Roger Grove

Roger Robert Grove (June 19, 1908 – December 19, 1986) was a professional American football running back in the National Football League. He played five seasons for the Green Bay Packers including the 1931 team that won the NFL Championship. He lettered at Michigan State in 1928, 1929 and 1930.

Treaty of Greenville

The Treaty of Greenville, formally titled Treaty with the Wyandots, etc., was a 1795 treaty between the United States and Indians of the Northwest Territory including the Wyandot and Delaware, which redefined the boundary between Indian lands and Whiteman's lands in the Northwest Territory.

It was signed at Fort Greenville, now Greenville, Ohio, on August 3, 1795, following the Native American loss at the Battle of Fallen Timbers a year earlier. It ended the Northwest Indian War in the Ohio Country, limited Indian Country to northwestern Ohio, and began the practice of annual payments following land concessions. The parties to the treaty were a coalition of Native American tribes known as the Western Confederacy, and the United States government represented by General Anthony Wayne and local frontiersmen.

The treaty became synonymous with the end of the frontier in the Northwest Territory.

Waring House (Greenville, Ohio)

The Waring House (also known as the "Waring-Stockslager Home") is a historic house in Greenville, Ohio, United States. Built by Oliver C. Perry, the house was started in 1860, but construction was only substantially completed in 1869, and the details took two more years to finish. As soon as he had finished the house, Perry sold it to T.M. Taylor, who in turn sold it to the family of local businessman and county commissioner Thomas Waring. Waring and his family were the first individuals to occupy the house, taking up residence in November 1874.The Waring House is a brick structure that rests upon a foundation of stone; it is topped with a roof of asphalt, and various other elements are made of metal. Its overall floor plan is rectangular, although modified by the addition of three wings to the rear. The dining room is a major part of a substantial two-story, two-bay wing attached to the main portion of the house, while two single-story wings — a single-bay structure in the form of a large pavilion, and a double-bay structure containing the kitchen — are in turn attached to the dining room wing.Among the Waring House's leading architectural elements are its windows, especially the distinctive segmental windows of the dining room wing. Overall, the house is a fine example of the Victorian style of residential architecture; although many nineteenth-century Greenville houses have been well preserved to the present time, few are as pristine as the home of Thomas Waring. In recognition of its historically significant architecture, the Waring House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on September 16, 1977; it was recognized as important primarily in the local community. Six other Greenville houses — known as the Beir, Coppess, Garst, Lansdowne, Leftwich, and Robeson Houses — have been accorded a similar honor; the Waring House was the fourth of these seven buildings to receive this designation. Today, the Waring House is operated as a bed and breakfast.

William Allen (congressman)

William Allen (August 13, 1827 – July 6, 1881) was a United States Representative from Ohio during the early part of the American Civil War.

Allen was born near Hamilton, Ohio, where he attended the public schools. As a young man, he taught school, then studied law. Allen was admitted to the bar in 1849 and commenced practice in Greenville, Ohio, in 1850. He was the prosecuting attorney of Darke County from 1850 until 1854.

Allen was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1859 – March 3, 1863), where he served as chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Interior (Thirty-seventh Congress). He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1862 and resumed the practice of law. He became affiliated with the Republican Party at the close of the Civil War and was appointed judge of the Court of Common Pleas of the second judicial district in 1865. He declined the Republican nomination for election to the Forty-sixth Congress in 1878 because of failing health. He was interested in banking until his death in Greenville, Ohio, in 1881. He was buried in Greenville Cemetery.

William T. Fitzgerald

William Thomas Fitzgerald (October 13, 1858 – January 12, 1939) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Greenville, Ohio, Fitzgerald attended the rural schools and the Greenville High School.

He served as member of the National Guard of Ohio 1875-1882, and saw service during the Newark riots in 1877.

He graduated from the National Normal University, Lebanon, Ohio, in 1887.

He taught in the Greenville High School 1886-1889.

He graduated from the medical department of the University of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, in 1891 and commenced practice in Greenville in 1891.

He served as member of the board of education 1906-1914.

He served as mayor of Greenville 1921-1925.

Fitzgerald was elected as a Republican to the Sixty-ninth and Seventieth Congresses (March 4, 1925 – March 3, 1929).

He served as chairman of the Committee on Revision of the Laws (Sixty-ninth Congress), Committee on Invalid Pensions (Seventieth Congress).

He was not a candidate for renomination in 1928 to the Seventy-first Congress.

He resumed the practice of medicine in Greenville, Ohio, where he died on January 12, 1939.

He was interred in Greenville Cemetery.

Municipalities and communities of Darke County, Ohio, United States
City
Villages
Townships
Unincorporated
communities
Footnotes

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