Green Bay Press-Gazette

The Green Bay Press-Gazette is a newspaper whose primary coverage is of northeastern Wisconsin, including Green Bay. It was founded as the Green Bay Gazette in 1866 as a weekly paper, becoming a daily newspaper in 1871. The Green Bay Gazette merged with its major competitor, the Green Bay Free Press in 1915, assuming its current title. The newspaper was purchased by Gannett in March 1980.[2]

In 1972, an internal labor dispute led to the creation of the Green Bay News-Chronicle by striking workers. In 2004, the News-Chronicle was taken over by Press-Gazette publisher, Gannett, who closed it in 2005.

Its sports section includes extensive coverage of the local NFL franchise, the Green Bay Packers. They also cover Wisconsin's Major League Baseball team, the Milwaukee Brewers.

On March 24, 2012, seven Press-Gazette employees were among 25 Gannett employees in Wisconsin who were disciplined by Gannett for signing the petition to recall Governor Scott Walker. Gannett stated that this was a violation of the company's code of journalistic ethics.[3][4]

Green Bay Press-Gazette
GreenBayPressGazetteBuilding
Press-Gazette Building
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
Owner(s)Gannett Company
PublisherScott Johnson
EditorRobert Zizzo
Founded1866 (as the Green Bay Gazette)
Headquarters435 East Walnut Street,
Green Bay, WI 54301 U.S.
Circulation41,542 daily
61,666 Sunday
(2013)[1]
Websitegreenbaypressgazette.com

References

  1. ^ "Gannett 2013 Annual Report", p. 17.
  2. ^ "About Gannett: Green Bay Press-Gazette". Gannett Co., Inc. Retrieved 2006-11-24.
  3. ^ Lovett, Genia (March 24, 2012). "Genia Lovett column: Post-Crescent journalists shouldn't have signed Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker recall petitions". The Post-Crescent. Appleton, WI. Archived from the original on March 27, 2012.
  4. ^ Green Bay Press Gazette. March 24, 2012.

External links

1926 All-Pro Team

The 1926 All-Pro Team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors at the end of the 1926 season as the best players at their positions for the All-Pro teams of the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL). Selectors for the 1926 season included the Green Bay Press-Gazette poll, the Chicago Tribune, and Collyer's Eye. Three players were unanimously selected as first-team players by all three selectors: fullback Ernie Nevers, halfback/quarterback Paddy Driscoll, and tackle Ed Healey.

1927 All-Pro Team

The 1927 All-Pro Team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors at the end as the best players at their positions for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1927 NFL season. Selectors for the 1927 season included the Green Bay Press-Gazette poll and the Chicago Tribune.

1928 All-Pro Team

The 1928 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1928 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB), based on the results of a questionnaires sent to the league managers and reporters, and the Chicago Tribune (CT).The Chicago Tribune picked quarterback Benny Friedman as the captain of its team, calling him "not only a great player but a magnificent showman," "a great passer and a field general par excellence."

1929 All-Pro Team

The 1929 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1929 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB), based on the return of 16 ballots sent to the team owners, managers, and sports writers of clubs in the NFL, Collyer's Eye magazine (CE), and the Chicago Tribune (CT).

1930 All-Pro Team

The 1930 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1930 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB), based on the returns of ballots sent to the league's coaches, club officials, sports writers and officials, and Collyer's Eye (CE).

1931 All-Pro Team

The 1931 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1931 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Green Bay Press-Gazette based on the returns of ballots sent to each club in the league as well as sports writers and officials, the United Press (UP), and Collyer's Eye (CE).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were unanimously selected for the first team by all three selectors: Portsmouth Spartans quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears halfback Red Grange; Chicago Cardinals fullback Ernie Nevers; and New York Giants guard Butch Gibson.

1933 All-Pro Team

The 1933 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1933 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press, Red Grange for Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB).

1934 All-Pro Team

The 1934 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1934 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB) based on the composite view of the coaches of 10 NFL teams and a half dozen NFL officials, Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Five players were selected as first-team All-Pro players by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears halfback Beattie Feathers; Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1935 All-Pro Team

The 1935 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1935 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. The following six players were selected to the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Chicago Cardinals end Bill Smith; Chicago Bears end Bill Karr; New York Giants tackle Bill Morgan; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

Andrew B. Turnbull

Andrew Blair Turnbull (February 26, 1884 – October 17, 1960), was a businessman and American football executive. Turnbull founded and owned the Green Bay Press-Gazette and was the first president of the Green Bay Football Corporation (now called Green Bay Packers, Inc.), the non-profit organization that owns the Green Bay Packers. He served as publisher, general manager, and business manager of the Press-Gazette for 45 years. During the early years of the Green Bay Packers, Turnbull helped convert the team from a privately held franchise to a publicly-owned, non-profit corporation. He also helped the team through multiple financially challenging periods, which saw him identified as part of The Hungry Five, a group of early Packers supporters. Between 1923 and 1928, he served as the first president of the Green Bay Football Corporation and remained on the corporation's board of directors and executive committee until 1949. Turnbull died in 1960 and was elected to the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1977.

Bay Park Square

Bay Park Square is a shopping mall owned by Simon Property Group, in the Green Bay, Wisconsin suburb of Ashwaubenon, in the United States. The mall opened in 1980 under the ownership of DeBartolo Corporation. Bay Park Square is located one mile (1.6 km) away from Lambeau Field on South Oneida Street (County Trunk Highway AAA).

The mall is anchored by Shopko (North end, opened 1979), Kohl's (East end, opened 1981), and Younkers (in the South end at the former Montgomery Ward location which opened in 1972 and closed with the rest of the chain in 2001, this Younkers location opened a few months before the closing of their Port Plaza Mall store in downtown Green Bay in 2003). Elder-Beerman, which opened in 1995 with the food court at the mall's West end, closed in February 2007 and was vacant for a few months until it was converted to a Younkers Furniture Gallery.

The mall also has an American football stadium-themed food court, known as the "Supper Bowl", located next door to Younkers Furniture.

Clarke Hinkle

William Clarke Hinkle (April 10, 1909 – November 9, 1988) was an American football player. He played on offense as a fullback, defense as a linebacker, and special teams as a kicker and punter. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame as part of its second class of inductees in 1964.

Known as one of the toughest players in the era of iron man football, Hinkle played for the Green Bay Packers from 1932 to 1941 and held the all-time National Football League (NFL) records for rushing yardage and carries when his playing career ended. He led the NFL in touchdowns (seven) in 1937, in points scored (58) in 1938, and in field goals made and field goal percentage in both 1940 and 1941. He was selected as a first- or second-team All-Pro in each of his 10 NFL seasons and helped lead the Packers to three NFL championship games and NFL championships in 1936 and 1939. His playing career was cut short in 1942 by military service.

A native of Toronto, Ohio, Hinkle also played college football for Bucknell from 1929 to 1931. He scored 50 points in a single game as a sophomore and led Bucknell to an undefeated season in 1931. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1971.

Lee Joannes

Joseph Leland Heath Joannes, known as Lee Joannes (October 17, 1892 – September 20, 1982), was a businessman and American football executive. Joannes owned a wholesale grocery store and was the fourth president of the Green Bay Football Corporation, which became Green Bay Packers, Inc. during his tenure. He was part of The Hungry Five, a group of businessmen who are credited with keeping the Green Bay Packers in operation during numerous financially difficult times. He served on the Packers board of directors for over 58 years in various roles, including chairman, president, vice president, secretary, treasurer, and director emeritus. During his 17 years as president from 1930 to 1947, the Packers won six NFL Championships while enduring the Great Depression and World War II. In recognition of his contributions, he was elected to the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1981. Joannes died in 1982 at the age of 89.

Lee Remmel

Leland "Lee" Remmel (June 30, 1924 – April 16, 2015) was a public relations/historian/spokesman and sportswriter. He was known for working 62 years with the Green Bay Packers as a sportswriter and later a team employee.Remmel was born in Shawano, Wisconsin, a small city about 30 miles (48 km) outside Green Bay, Wisconsin. He began writing as a freshman at Shawano High School and went to his first Packers game on September 24, 1944. On October 7, 1945, Remmel started covering the Green Bay Packers as a sportswriter for the Green Bay Press Gazette. He was the only sportswriter who had covered all of the Packers coaches from the team's first coach Curly Lambeau to Bart Starr. He was hired to work in the Packers front office in 1974 as the teams public relations director and spokesman. In February 2004, Remmel was named the first historian for the Green Bay Packers, a role he served until his retirement in December 2007 at age 83. He remained on the board of directors for the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.

Remmel covered the first forty Super Bowls. He represented the Press Gazette at the first eight, 22 as NFL auxiliary media relations staff, two years for the Green Bay Packers, and another eight with the NFL. He was one of twelve people honored by the NFL for their association with the first forty Super Bowls. Remmel has served on NFL committees on statistics and NFL Films, and participated in the NFL public relations directors' Professional Football Writers of America liaison.Remmel is known for his in-depth knowledge of Packer's history, especially about the team's rivalry with the Chicago Bears. Former Packers quarterback Brett Favre described Remmel, "He’s a Packers icon. There will never be another like him. His knowledge of the team and its history has always been impressive. He is sharp as a tack when it came to those things – truly impressive."

Mike Michalske

August Mike Michalske (April 24, 1903 – October 26, 1983), sometimes known as "Iron Mike", was an American football player and coach. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as part of its second induction class in 1964. He was also named in 1969 to the NFL 1920s All-Decade Team.

Born and raised in Cleveland, Michalske played college football, principally at the guard and fullback positions, for Hugo Bezdek's Penn State Nittany Lions from 1923 to 1925. He played professional football as a guard with the New York Yankees from 1926 to 1927 and with the Green Bay Packers from 1929 to 1935 and 1937. He led the Packers to three consecutive National Football League (NFL) championships from 1929 to 1931 and was selected seven times as a first-team All-Pro between 1927 and 1935.

Michalske also had a long career as a football coach, including serving as Iowa State's head coach from 1942 to 1946 and as an assistant coach with Lafayette College (1936), the Green Bay Packers (1937), the Chicago Cardinals (1939), St. Norbert College (1940-1941), Baltimore Colts (1949), Baylor (1950-1952), Texas A&M (1953), and Texas (1954).

The Hungry Five

The Hungry Five are the five Green Bay, Wisconsin area businessmen who were instrumental in keeping the Green Bay Packers franchise in operation during its early years. They raised funds, incorporated the team as a non-profit corporation, sold stock, established the Green Bay Packers Board of Directors and otherwise promoted the franchise.

The Hungry Five consisted of Curly Lambeau, attorney Andrew B. Turnbull, attorney Gerald Francis Clifford, Dr. W. Webber Kelly and Lee Joannes. Turnbull was the Packers' first president and publisher of the Green Bay Press-Gazette. Joannes was the president for 17 years, helping guide the Packers through the Great Depression, near bankruptcy and a second stock sale. Kelly served one year as president, and also as team physician and as a board member. Clifford served on the Executive Committee for two decades. All have been inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.

Despite their years of service, only coach/player Curly Lambeau was ever paid a salary. “The Hungry Five” nickname was coined, as can best be determined, by Arch Ward, because they always seemed to have their hands out for money, since the franchise was often in financial trouble.

Titletown District

The Titletown District, also known as the Titletown Entertainment District or simply Titletown, is a mixed-use development located on 45 acres (18 ha) of land adjacent to Lambeau Field in Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin. The district, which opened in 2017, was developed by the Green Bay Packers as a destination that will support tourism by providing year-round activities for local residents and tourists, gameday activities, as well as provide a local shopping and entertainment destination. As of June 2018, the district, which includes a 10-acre (4.0 ha) park and plaza, is anchored by a Hinterland Brewery, a Lodge Kohler hotel, and a Bellin Health center.

Plans for Phase 2 were announced by the Green Bay Packers on Oct 03, 2018 which will add the residential and office elements to the project including up to 150 apartment building units, 70-90 townhomes available for ownership and 130,000SF of mixed-use office space over retail/restaurant in a four to five story building.The Ashwaubenon village board unanimously approved the plan on Tuesday, December 18. 2018. Construction will begin in the spring of 2019. Completion for the office building and first residences are projected by the summer of 2020.

W. Webber Kelly

W. Webber Kelly (December 7, 1875 – August 3, 1951), born William Webber Kelly, was a prominent medical doctor in the state of Wisconsin known for being the third president of the Green Bay Football Corporation (now called Green Bay Packers, Inc.), the non-profit organization that owns the Green Bay Packers. Kelly was a practicing physician in the Green Bay, Wisconsin area for almost 50 years and a respected civic leader. During his one year as president of the Packers for the 1929 season, the team went 12–0–1 and won its first NFL Championship. Kelly was identified as part of The Hungry Five, a group of Green Bay businessmen who were instrumental in guiding the Packers through multiple financially challenging periods. In addition to his presidency, Kelly served as the team physician from 1921 to 1943 and as a member of the Packers Board of Directors from 1923 to 1949. After a falling out with Packers co-founder, head coach, and general manager Curly Lambeau, Kelly resigned from the Board in 1949. Two years later he died of a heart attack at the age of 75. In recognition of his contributions, Kelly was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1994.

Walt Kiesling

Walter Andrew Kiesling (May 27, 1903 – March 2, 1962) was an American football guard and tackle who spent 36 years as a player, coach, and aide with National Football League (NFL) teams. He was posthumously inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1966 and was named to the NFL 1920s All-Decade Team in 1969.

A native of Saint Paul, Minnesota, Kiesling played college football at the University of St. Thomas where he was selected as an all-state player in 1923, 1924, and 1925. He then played 13 years as a guard and tackle in the NFL with the Duluth Eskimos (1926–1927),

Pottsville Maroons (1928), Chicago Cardinals (1929–1933), Chicago Bears (1934), Green Bay Packers (1935–1936), and Pittsburgh Pirates (1937–1938). He was a first-team All-Pro in 1929, 1930, and 1932, a second-team All-Pro in 1931, and played for the Packers' 1936 NFL championship team.

Kiesling also spent 25 years as a coach or aide for NFL teams, including seven years as head coach of the Pittsburgh Pirates/Steelers from 1939 to 1942 and 1954 to 1956. He led the Steelers to their first winning season in 1942. He also served as co-coach of the wartime merger teams known as the Steagles in 1943 and Card-Pitt in 1944 and as line coach for the Pirates (1937–1938), Green Bay Packers (1945–1948), and Steelers (1949–1953). He retired from active coaching for health reasons in 1957 but remained an aide to the Steelers coaching staff from 1957 to 1961.

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