Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame

The Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame was the first hall of fame built to honor a single professional American football team. William L. Brault, a Green Bay restaurateur and Packers fan, founded the Hall of Fame in 1966. According to Brault, he got the idea after visitors to Green Bay would repeatedly ask about the Packers' storied history. Sensing opportunity, Brault went to Packers head coach Vince Lombardi, suggesting a "Hall of Fame" should be made to educate tourists about the Packers and their history. Lombardi gave Brault his approval, and according to Brault, as he left, Lombardi called out to him, "Don't screw it up!"

The "Hall" started off as a series of exhibits displayed in the concourse of the Brown County Veterans Memorial Arena, although it was not a permanent residence, as the exhibits had to be removed each autumn to make room for the Green Bay Bobcats hockey team, which played its home games at the Arena. In 1967, the Packer Hall of Fame Association, a separate corporate entity from the team, was founded and annual induction banquets were subsequently launched in 1970. The Hall did not become a permanent site until 1976 when its new home, an addition to the Brown County Veterans Arena, was formally dedicated on April 3, 1976, by President Gerald R. Ford.[1] Outside of the Hall of Fame was a 'Receiver Statue' that was dedicated to the invention of the Forward Pass.

Over the next 26 years, the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame encountered many expansions and renovations. In 2003, renovations to Lambeau Field provided a new home within the new Lambeau Field Atrium for the Hall. Packers legends Bart Starr and Ron Wolf rededicated the Hall on September 4, 2003.[1] The Hall contains a vast array of Packers memorabilia, a re-creation of Vince Lombardi's office, plaques representing each of the inductees and the Lombardi trophies from Green Bay's four Super Bowl wins.[2] As of 2017, the Packers Hall of Fame has inducted 159 people, 24 of whom have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The 2018 inductees were offensive tackle Mark Tauscher and kicker Ryan Longwell.

Sign at Entrance to Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame

Inductees

PackersHoF-edit
The entrance to the Hall of Fame
Replica of Vince Lombardi's Office
Replica of Vince Lombardi's office at the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.
Induction
year
Inductee Position Years Notes
1970 Bernard "Boob" Darling C 1927–31
1970 Lavern Dilweg E 1927–34
1970 Jug Earp C 1922–32
1970 Cal Hubbard * OT 1929–33
1935
1970 Curly Lambeau * B / Coach 1919–49
1970 Verne Lewellen B 1924–32
1970 John McNally * B 1929–33
1935–36
1970 Mike Michalske * G 1929–35
1937
1972 Hank Bruder B 1931–39
1972 Milt Gantenbein E 1931–40
1972 Charles Goldenberg G / B 1933–45
1972 Arnie Herber * B 1930–40
1972 Clarke Hinkle * B 1932–41
1972 Don Hutson * E / DB 1935–45
1972 Cecil Isbell B 1938–42
1972 Joe Laws B 1934–45
1972 Russ Letlow G 1936–42
1946
1972 George Svendsen C / LB 1935–37
1940–41
1981 Herb Adderley * DB 1961–69
1983 Donny Anderson RB / P 1966–71
1988 Lionel Aldridge DE 1963–71
1996 John Anderson LB 1978–89
1988 Jerry Atkinson Executive 1950–85 [a]
1979 Nate Barragar C 1931–32
1934–35
1985 Phil Bengtson General Manager 1959–70
2005 Edgar Bennett RB 1992–96
2002 Vernon Biever Photographer 1946–2010 [b]
1981 Ken Bowman C 1964–73
1989 Zeke Bratkowski QB 1963–68
1971
1995 William Brault HoF Founder 1966–94 [c]
1973 Charley Brock C / LB 1939–47
1982 Lou Brock B 1940–45
1984 John Brockington RB 1971–77
2007 Robert Brooks WR 1992–98
2008 Gilbert Brown DT 1993–99
2001–03
1987 Dr. E. S. Brusky Physician 1962–90 [d]
1993 Willie Buchanon CB 1972–78
1977 Howard "Cub" Buck OT 1921–25
1986 Wilner Burke Director of the
Lumberjack Band
1938–81 [e]
2007 LeRoy Butler S 1990–2001
1986 Lee Roy Caffey LB 1964–69
1978 George Whitney Calhoun Executive 1919–46 [f]
1973 Tony Canadeo * B 1941–44
1946–52
1974 Al Carmichael RB 1953–58
1983 Fred Carr LB 1968–77
1975 Don Chandler K 1965–67
2010 Mark Chmura TE 1992–99
1991 Gerald Francis Clifford Attorney 1922–52 [g]
1997 Red Cochran Coach/Scout 1959–66
1971–2004
[h]
1994 Paul Coffman TE 1978–85
1986 Irv Comp B 1943–49
1974 Fred Cone FB / K 1951–57
1973 Larry Craig B / E 1939–49
1984 Dan Currie LB 1958–64
1979 Carroll Dale E 1965–72
1993 Art Daley Journalist 1942–2011 [i]
1975 Willie Davis * DE 1960–69
1992 Lynn Dickey QB 1977
1979–85
1974 Bobby Dillon DB 1952–59
2003 Mike Douglass LB 1978–85
1978 Boyd Dowler WR 1959–69
1976 Joseph "Red" Dunn B 1927–31
1994 Gerry Ellis FB 1980–86
1998 Ken Ellis CB 1970–75
1978 Paul "Tiny" Engebretsen G 1934–41
1978 Lon Evans G 1933–37
1974 Howie Ferguson FB 1953–58
1974 Bill Forester LB 1953–63
2010 Marv Fleming TE 1963–69
1973 Bob Forte B 1946–53
2009 Antonio Freeman WR 1995–01,03
1973 Ted Fritsch B 1942–50
1982 Gale Gillingham G 1966–74
1976
1993 Johnnie Gray S 1975–83
2014 Ahman Green RB 2000–06, 09
1977 Forrest Gregg * OT 1956
1958–70
1976 Hank Gremminger DB 1956–65
1974 Dave Hanner DT 1952–64
2004 Bob Harlan Executive 1971–present [j]
2011 William Henderson FB 1995–06
2001 Johnny Holland LB 1987–93
2012 Mike Holmgren Coach 1992–98
1975 Paul Hornung * HB / K 1957–62
1964–66
1974 Billy Howton E 1952–58
2003 Jim Irwin Sportscaster 1969–98 [k]
1991 Harry Jacunski E 1939–44
1984 Ed Jankowski B 1937–41
1985 Bob Jeter DB 1963–70
1981 Lee Joannes Executive 1930–47 [l]
1997 Ezra Johnson DE 1977–87
1981 Chester "Swede" Johnston RB 1931
1934–38
2011 Frank Jonet Executive 1919–51
1975 Henry Jordan * DT 1959–69
1976 Carl Jorgensen Trainer 1924–70 [m]
1994 W. Webber Kelly Physician 1923–51 [n]
1976 Gary Knafelc E 1954–62
2010 Greg Koch OT 1977–85
1989 Ron Kostelnik DT 1961–68
1975 Jerry Kramer * G / K 1958–68
1975 Ron Kramer TE 1957
1959–64
1983 Fred Leicht Executive 1925–77 [o]
2009 Dorsey Levens RB 1994–01
1999 James Lofton * WR 1978–86
1975 Vince Lombardi * Coach, Executive 1959–68
2005 Don Majkowski QB 1987–92
1988 Bob Mann E 1950–54
1987 Chester Marcol K 1972–80
1974 John Martinkovic E 1951–56
1977 Charlie Mathys B 1922–26
1992 Larry McCarren C 1973–84
1975 Max McGee E 1954
1957–67
1999 Tom Miller Executive 1956–88 [p]
1973 Bob Monnett B 1933–38
1984 Carl Mulleneaux E 1938–41
1945–46
1998 Mark Murphy S 1980–85
1987–91
1978 Ray Nitschke * LB 1958–72
1979 Dominic Olejniczak Executive 1950–89 [q]
1998 Robert J. Parins Executive 1982–89 [r]
1979 Elijah Pitts RB 1961–69
1971
1973 Baby Ray OT 1938–48
1996 Lee Remmel Executive 1940s–2015 [s]
1974 Jim Ringo * C 1953–63
2011 Marco Rivera G 1996–04
1982 Dave Robinson * LB 1963–72
1974 Tobin Rote QB 1950–56
2014 Ken Ruettgers OT 1985–96
1992 Al Schneider Supporter 1950s–1970s [t]
2001 Ray Scott Sportscaster 1956–68 [u]
2002 Sterling Sharpe WR 1988–94
1976 Bob Skoronski OT 1956
1959–68
1977 Bart Starr * QB 1956–71
1991 Jan Stenerud * K 1980–83
1985 Earl "Bud" Svendsen C / LB 1937
1939
1975 Jim Taylor * FB 1958–66
1987 Deral Teteak LB / G 1952–56
1975 Fred Thurston G 1959–67
1979 Pete Tinsley G/LB 1938–39
1941–45
2008 Al Treml Video director 1967–2001 [v]
1984 F. N. Trowbridge, Sr. Executive 1950–81 [w]
1977 Andrew B. Turnbull Executive 1923–27 [x]
1973 Andy Uram HB 1938–43
1982 Jack Vainisi Scout 1950–60 [y]
2006 Reggie White * DE 1993–98
1976 Jesse Whittenton DB 1958–64
1973 Dick Wildung OT 1946–51
1953
1997 Travis Williams RB/KR 1967–70
2008 Frank Winters C 1992–2002
2000 Ron Wolf * Executive 1991–2001 [z]
1977 Willie Wood * S 1960–71
1973 HL "Whitey" Woodin G 1922–31
2013 Emil Fischer Contributor 1926–58 [aa]
2013 Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila DE 2000–08 [bb]
2013 Chris Jacke K 1989–96
2015 Brett Favre * QB 1992–07
2016 Nick Collins  FS 2005–11
2016 Chad Clifton  OT 2000–11
2016 Russ Winnie  Broadcaster 1929–46
2017 Donald Driver  WR 1999–2012
2017 Mark Lee  CB 1980–90
2018 Ryan Longwell  K 1997–2005 [3]
2018 Mark Tauscher  OT 2000–10

See also

References

General
  • "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame". PackersHallofFame.com. Retrieved June 17, 2011.
  • "Packers.com – Packers Hall of Fame". Packers.com. Archived from the original on April 29, 2008. Retrieved June 17, 2008.
  • "LambeauField.com – Hall of Fame". LambeauField.com. Retrieved June 17, 2008.
Specific
  1. ^ a b "Packers.com – Packers Hall of Fame". Packers.com. Archived from the original on April 29, 2008. Retrieved May 3, 2008.
  2. ^ "LambeauField.com – Hall of Fame". LambeauField.com. Retrieved May 3, 2008.
  3. ^ "Packers Hall of Fame Induction Banquet". www.packers.com. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  4. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Jerry Atkinson". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  5. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Vernon Biever". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  6. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – William Brault". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  7. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Dr. E.S. (Gene) Brusky". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  8. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Wilner Burke". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  9. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – George Whitney Calhoun". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  10. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Gerald (Jerry) Clifford". PackersHallofFame.org. Archived from the original on May 16, 2010. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  11. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – John "Red" Cochran". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  12. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Art Daley". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  13. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Robert "Bob" Harlan". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  14. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Jim Irwin". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  15. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Lee Joannes". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  16. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Carl (Bud) Jorgensen". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  17. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Dr. William Weber Kelly". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  18. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Fred Leicht". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  19. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Tom Miller". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  20. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Dominic Olejniczak". PackersHallofFame.org. Archived from the original on October 22, 2013. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  21. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Robert Parins". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  22. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Lee Remmel". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  23. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Al Schneider". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  24. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Ray Scott". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  25. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Al Treml". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  26. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Fred N. Trowbridge Sr". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  27. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Andrew B. Turnbull". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  28. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Jack Vainisi". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  29. ^ "Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame – Ron Wolf". PackersHallofFame.org. Retrieved May 4, 2008.
  30. ^ a b http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/sports/187887441.html
  31. ^ https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/09/28/clay-matthews-becomes-packers-all-time-sacks-leader/
Andy Uram

Andrew "Andy" Uram Jr. (March 21, 1915 – December 9, 1984) was a running back and defensive back in the National Football League who played for the Green Bay Packers. Uram played collegiate ball for the University of Minnesota before being drafted by the Packers in the 6th round of the 1938 NFL Draft. He played professionally for six seasons from 1938 to 1943. After the 1943 NFL season, Uram served in the United States Navy during World War II. In 1973, Uram was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. He died in 1984, at the age of 69.

Bob Monnett

Robert C. Monnett (February 27, 1910 – August 2, 1978) was a professional American football player who played halfback for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973.

Boob Darling

Bernard "Boob" Darling (November 18, 1903 – March 5, 1968) was an American football player. He played his entire five-year career with the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1970. Bernard received his nickname from his younger sister who always called him 'booboo' which was eventually shortened to just 'boob'. Darling died at Milwaukee in March 1968, of cancer.

Bud Svendsen

Earl Gilbert "Bud" Svendsen (February 7, 1915 – August 7, 1996) was a professional American football player who played center and linebacker for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers and the Brooklyn Dodgers of the National Football League (NFL). He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1985.

Carl Mulleneaux

Carl Kenneth "Moose" Mulleneaux (September 16, 1914 – January 23, 1995) was a professional American football end in the National Football League. He played six seasons for the Green Bay Packers (1938–1941, 1945–1946). He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1983.

After retiring from the Packers in 1946 due to injuries (in particular a vicious hit delivered by John Schiechl during a punt return), Mulleneaux coached football at the University of St. Louis, Texas Tech, Arizona, Fullerton College, and finally Santa Monica College. Mulleneaux was part of the coaching staff that took the SMCC Corsairs to an undefeated season, and the Junior Rose Bowl championship in 1958. Nicknamed "Moose", Mulleneaux also served as the Corsairs Golf coach for many years, garnering Coach of the Year honors along the way.

After retiring from coaching, Mulleneaux returned to the Phoenix, Arizona area and was active in NFL Alumni charity functions.

Eddie Jankowski

Edward "Eddie" Joe Jankowski (June 23, 1913 – July 20, 1996) was an American football player. He played running back for five seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1984. He played college football at the University of Wisconsin, where he was a member of the Sigma Nu Fraternity. Following his playing career, Jankowski was an officer in the United States Navy during World War II before working for Miller Brewing Company and becoming a coach at Whitefish Bay High School.

Greg Koch

Greg Koch (born June 14, 1955) is a former American football tackle and guard who played eleven seasons in the National Football League, mainly with the Green Bay Packers. In 2010, Koch was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. Koch was also inducted into the University of Arkansas Sports Hall of Honor in 2010. He was inducted in the State of Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame in March 2016. He is a licensed attorney and co-host of In The Trenches with Koch and Kalu on SportsTalk 790 KBME in Houston, Texas. Also known for his 16 hour drinking contest with WWE Lex Luger.

Hank Bruder

Henry George "Hank" Bruder Jr. (November 22, 1907 – June 29, 1970) was an American football player in the National Football League. He played nine years with the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1939 and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Bruder attended Northwestern University, where he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity.He was part of the offensive line that blocked for Pro Football Hall of Fame back Johnny "Blood" McNally.

Harry Jacunski

Hieronym Anthony “Harry” Jacunski (October 20, 1915 – February 20, 2003) was a National Football League (NFL) player and college football coach for over 40 years.

Jacunski was an All-state center on the New Britain High School 1934 basketball team and played football with Vince Lombardi at Fordham University, where Jacunski was one of Fordham’s "Seven Blocks of Granite". In 1938 he was co-captain of the Fordham football team where he started as end.

He played in the NFL for six seasons (1939 – 1944) as defensive end for the Green Bay Packers, who were NFL champions in 1939 and 1944.

In 1945 he started a 35-year coaching career: one year at University of Notre Dame, two years at Harvard University, and the last 33 years at Yale University. Jacunski was inducted into both the Fordham and Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.

Joe Laws

Joseph Ray Laws (June 16, 1911 – August 22, 1979) was an American football player. He played his entire career with the Green Bay Packers, winning three World Championships, and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Prior to joining the Packers, Laws attended the University of Iowa where he was a member of Sigma Pi fraternity. While at Iowa he was named All-Big Ten quarterback and the Big Ten Most Valuable Player in 1933. On December 17, 1944 Joe Laws set an NFL postseason record (since broken), by intercepting 3 passes in the Packers' 14-7 victory over the Giants in the league title game.

John Anderson (American football)

Roger John Anderson (born February 14, 1956) is a former American football player.

A native of Waukesha, Wisconsin, Anderson played 12 seasons in the National Football League (NFL) as a linebacker for the Green Bay Packers from 1978 to 1989. He was selected as the Packers' most valuable defensive player three consecutive years. At the end of his career with the Packers, he was the team's all-time leader in tackles and was tied with Ray Nitschke for the Packers' career record in interceptions by a linebacker. Anderson was named a second-team player on the NFL 1980s All-Decade Team and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1996.

Anderson also played college football as a linebacker and defensive end for the University of Michigan from 1974 to 1977. He was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten Conference player in 1976 and a first-team All-American in 1977. In 2009, he became the linebackers coach at Carroll University.

Jug Earp

Francis Louis "Jug" Earp (July 22, 1897 – January 8, 1969) was a professional American football player. He attended Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois with the class of 1921. He played eleven seasons in the National Football League (NFL), mostly with the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1970. He also played with the Rock Island Independents, three games for the New York Yankees, and one game for the Frankford Yellow Jackets.

He is the cousin of Wyatt Earp; his father and Nicholas Porter Earp were brothers.[1]

Lou Brock (American football)

James Lewis Brock (December 9, 1917 – May 7, 1989) was an American football player. He played his entire six-year career with the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1982.

Mark Murphy (safety, born 1958)

Mark Steven Murphy (born April 22, 1958 in Canton, Ohio) is a former American football safety in the National Football League. He was signed by the Green Bay Packers as an undrafted free agent in 1980. He played college football at West Liberty State College.

Murphy was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1998.

Pete Tinsley

Elijah Pope "Pete" Tinsley (March 16, 1913 – May 11, 1995) was a professional football player, born in Sumter, South Carolina, who played guard, defense and offense for eight seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1979.

Red Dunn

Joseph Aloysius "Red" Dunn (June 21, 1901 – January 15, 1957) was a professional American football player who played running back and was an exceptional punter for eight seasons for the Milwaukee Badgers, Chicago Cardinals, and Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1976. He is the grandfather of former quarterback Jason Gesser.

Nicknamed "Red" for the color of his hair, Dunn possessed an equally colorful personality. He earned five letters competing in football, basketball and baseball at Marquette Academy. Dunn later attended Marquette University, earning All-America honors while leading the Golden Avalanche in 1922 and 1923 to a 17–0–1 record. While a Packer, he served as Curly Lambeau's "field general" for the 1929, 1930, and 1931 NFL Champions.

After this playing days Dunn moved to coaching, assisting Frank Murray and Paddy Driscoll at Marquette from 1932 to 1940. Dunn is a member of the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame and the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame.

Swede Johnston

Chester Arthur "Swede" Johnston (March 7, 1910 – September 19, 2002) was a professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Cincinnati Reds, Green Bay Packers, St. Louis Gunners, Cleveland Rams, and Pittsburgh Steelers.

Johnston was born in Appleton, Wisconsin to Swedish immigrant parents. In 1981, he was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. He died in St. Louis, Missouri and is buried in Dodgeville, Wisconsin.

The Hungry Five

The Hungry Five are the five Green Bay, Wisconsin area businessmen who were instrumental in keeping the Green Bay Packers franchise in operation during its early years. They raised funds, incorporated the team as a non-profit corporation, sold stock, established the Green Bay Packers Board of Directors and otherwise promoted the franchise.

The Hungry Five consisted of Curly Lambeau, attorney Andrew B. Turnbull, attorney Gerald Francis Clifford, Dr. W. Webber Kelly and Lee Joannes. Turnbull was the Packers' first president and publisher of the Green Bay Press-Gazette. Joannes was the president for 17 years, helping guide the Packers through the Great Depression, near bankruptcy and a second stock sale. Kelly served one year as president, and also as team physician and as a board member. Clifford served on the Executive Committee for two decades. All have been inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.

Despite their years of service, only coach/player Curly Lambeau was ever paid a salary. “The Hungry Five” nickname was coined, as can best be determined, by Arch Ward, because they always seemed to have their hands out for money, since the franchise was often in financial trouble.

Whitey Woodin

Howard Lee "Whitey" Woodin (January 29, 1894 – February 7, 1974) was an American football player. He played with the Racine Legion and the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973. After retiring from football, Woodin remained in Green Bay and worked for many years at Falls Power and Paper Company.

Franchise
Records
Stadiums
Training facilities
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Division championships (18)
Conference championships (9)
League championships (13)
Retired numbers
Media
Current league affiliations
Seasons (100)
Championship seasons in bold
Members of the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame

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