Greek euro coins

Greek euro coins feature a unique design for each of the eight coins. They were all designed by Georgios Stamatopoulos with the minor coins depicting Greek ships, the middle ones portraying famous Greeks and the two large denominations showing images of Greek history and mythology. All designs feature the 12 stars of the EU, the year of imprint and a tiny symbol of the Bank of Greece. Uniquely, the value of the coins is expressed on the national side in the Greek alphabet, as well as being on the common side in the Roman alphabet. The euro cent is known as the lepto (λεπτό; plural lepta, λεπτά) in Greek.

Greece did not enter the Eurozone until 2001 and was not able to start minting coins as early as the other eleven member states, so a number of coins circulated in 2002 were not minted in Athens but in Finland (€1 and €2 – mint mark S), France (1c, 2c, 5c, 10c and 50c – mint mark F) and Spain (20c – mint mark E). The coins minted in Athens for the euro introduction in 2002, as well as all the subsequent Greek euro coins, carry only the Greek mint mark.

Greek euro design

For images of the common side and a detailed description of the coins, see euro coins.

Depiction of Greek euro coinage | Obverse side
€ 0.01 € 0.02 € 0.05
An Athenian trireme of the 5th century BC A corvette of the early 19th century A modern tanker, symbol of Greek enterprise
€ 0.10 € 0.20 € 0.50
Rigas Feraios, Greek writer and revolutionary Ioannis Kapodistrias, Greece's first statesman Eleftherios Venizelos, Greek politician
€ 1.00 € 2.00 € 2 Coin Edge
The words Hellenic Republic in Greek script (ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΗ ΔΗΜΟΚΡΑΤΙΑ)
Picture of a 5th-century BC 4 drachma coin of Athens (a coin in a coin) The abduction of Europa by Zeus in the form of a bull

Circulating mintage quantities

The following table shows the mintage quantity for all Greek euro coins, per denomination, per year (the numbers are represented in millions).[1]

Face Value €0.01 €0.02 €0.05 €0.10 €0.20 €0.50 €1.00 €2.00 €2.00 CC
2002 100.94 175.94 210.94 138.94 208.94 92.94 61.44 75.34 *
2002 EFS 15.0 18.0 90.0 100.0 120.0 70.0 50.0 70.0 *
2003 35.1 9.4 0.6507 0.5007 0.7007 0.6007 11.60 0.4507 *
2004 49.97 24.97 0.22 9.97 0.47 0.47 9.97 * 34.5
2005 14.95 14.95 0.95 24.95 0.95 0.95 9.95 0.95 *
2006 44.95 44.95 49.95 44.95 0.95 0.95 9.95 0.95 *
2007 60.03 25.0 55.0 60.04 0.95 0.95 24.17 * 3.978549
2008 24.0 68.0 50.0 40.0 20.0 10.0 4.0 1.0 *
2009 49.975 15.975 37.975 45.975 23.975 6.975 17.975 0.975 3.9925
2010 27.0 31.0 5.0 5.0 12.0 6.0 11.0 1.0 2.4925
2011 35.0 47.0 34.0 36.0 1.0 7.0 1.0 * 0.995
2012 48.0 34.0 5.0 * * * * * 1.0
2013 ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** **

* No coins were minted that year for that denomination
** Data not available yet
*** Small quantities minted for sets only

Greek starter kit

In 2001, the Bank of Greece issued starter kits for the introduction of the Euro.

Identifying marks

National Identifier None yet
Mint Mark Euro mintmark greece.jpg
Engravers Initials Euro.inscription.initial.greece.388.jpg
ΓΣ
€2 Edge inscription Edge greece s01 ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΗ ΔΗΜΟΚΡΑΤΙΑ ✯

Commemorative coins

Greece has a good collection of euro commemorative coins, mainly in silver although a few coins have also been minted in gold. Their face value range from €10 to €200 euro. This is mainly done as a legacy of an old national practice of minting gold and silver coins. These coins are not really intended to be used as means of payment, so generally they do not circulate. Here you can find some samples:

2003 Greece 200 Euro 75 anniversary of Bank of Greece front

Gold, 200 euro, 75th anniversary of Bank of Greece (2003)

2006 Greece 10 Euro Patras front

Silver, 10 euro, Patras European Capital of Culture (2006)

2008 Greece 10 euro Acropolis back

Silver, 10 euro, Acropolis Museum (2008)

€2 commemorative coin Greece 2007 TOR

50th Anniversary of the Signature of the Treaty of Rome (2007)

References

  1. ^ "Circulating Mintage quantities". Henning Agt. Retrieved 22 August 2008.

External links

10 euro cent coin

The 10 euro cent coin (€0.10) has a value of one tenth of a euro and is composed of an alloy called Nordic gold. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

1 euro cent coin

The 1 euro cent coin (€0.01) has a value of one hundredth of a euro and is composed of copper-covered steel. The coins of every Euro country have a common reverse and each has a country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as was the case with the higher-value coins.

1 euro coin

The 1-euro coin (€1) is a euro coin with a value of one euro. It is made of two alloys: the inner part of cupronickel, the outer part of nickel brass. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

As of July 2015, there were approximately 6.7 billion one-euro coins in circulation, constituting 26.4% of all circulated euro coins by value and 5.9% by quantity.

20 euro cent coin

The 20 euro cent coin (€0.20) has a value of one fifth of a euro and is composed of an alloy called nordic gold in the Spanish flower shape. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

2 euro cent coin

The 2 euro cent coin (€0.02) has a value of one-fiftieth of a euro and is composed of copper-plated steel. All coins have a common reverse and country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as were the higher-value coins.

2 euro coin

The 2 euro coin (€2) is the highest value euro coin and has been used since the introduction of the euro (in its cash form) in 2002. The coin is used in 22 countries (with 20 legally adopting it) with a collective population of about 341 million. The coin is made of two alloys: the inner part of nickel brass, the outer part of copper-nickel. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

The €2 coin is the coin subject to legal-tender commemorative issues and hence there is a large number of national sides, including three issues of identical commemorative sides by all eurozone members.

50 euro cent coin

The 50 euro cent coin (€0.50) has a value of half a euro and are composed of an alloy called nordic gold. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

5 euro cent coin

The 5 euro cent coin (€0.05) has a value of one twentieth of a euro and is composed of copper-covered steel. All coins have a common reverse and country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not re-designed in 2007 as was the case with the higher-value coins.

Euro gold and silver commemorative coins (Greece)

Euro gold and silver commemorative coins are special euro coins minted and issued by member states of the Eurozone, mainly in gold and silver, although other precious metals are also used in rare occasions. Greece was one of the first twelve countries in the Eurozone that introduced the euro (€) on 1 January 2002. Since 2003, the Mint of Greece have been minting both normal issues of Greek euro coins, which are intended for circulation, and commemorative euro coins in gold and silver.

These special coins have a legal tender only in Greece, unlike the normal issues of the Greek euro coins, which have a legal tender in every country of the Eurozone. This means that the commemorative coins made of gold and silver cannot be used as money in other countries. Furthermore, as their bullion value generally vastly exceeds their face value, these coins are not intended to be used as means of payment at all—although it remains possible. For this reason, they are usually named Collectors' coins.

The coins usually commemorate the anniversaries of historical events or draw attention to current events of special importance. Greece mints four of these coins on average per year, mainly in silver, with a typical face value of €10. However, to celebrate the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, Greece minted almost three times more than normal number of coins in 2003 and 2004, in both gold and silver.

Greek drachma

Drachma (Greek: δραχμή Modern Greek: [ðraxˈmi], Ancient Greek: [drakʰmέː]; pl. drachmae or drachmas) was the currency used in Greece during several periods in its history:

An ancient Greek currency unit issued by many Greek city states during a period of ten centuries, from the Archaic period throughout the Classical period, the Hellenistic period up to the Roman period under Greek Imperial Coinage.

Three modern Greek currencies, the first introduced in 1832 and the last replaced by the euro in 2001 (at the rate of 340.75 drachma to the euro). The euro did not begin circulating until 2002 but the exchange rate was fixed on 19 June 2000, with legal introduction of the euro taking place in January 2002.It was also a small unit of weight.

Identifying marks on euro coins

Before the introduction of the euro, the current eurozone members issued their own individual national coinage, most of which featured mint marks, privy marks and/or mint master marks. These marks have been continued as a part of the national designs of the euro coins, as well. This article serves to list the information about the various types of identifying marks on euro coins, including engraver and designer initials and the unique edge inscriptions found on the €2 coins.

Kefalovryso, Ioannina

Kefalovryso (Greek: Κεφαλόβρυσο, Aromanian: Migidei, Migideia) is a village and a community of the Pogoni municipality. Before the 2011 local government reform it was a part of the municipality of Ano Pogoni, of which it was a municipal district and the seat. The 2011 census recorded 838 residents in the village. The community of Kefalovryso covers an area of 15.831 km2.

List of euro mints

Several euro mints exist in the eurozone. Not every eurozone member state has its own mint to produce euro coins.

Mincovňa Kremnica, Slovakia

Slovak euro coins

Staatliche Münzen Baden-Württemberg

German euro coins

Latvian euro coins

Suomen Rahapaja (Mint of Finland)

Estonian euro coins

Greek euro coins

Luxembourgish euro coins

Slovenian euro coins

Cypriot euro coins

Irish euro coins

Istituto Poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato

Vatican euro coins

Palmette

The palmette is a motif in decorative art which, in its most characteristic expression, resembles the fan-shaped leaves of a palm tree. It has a far-reaching history, originating in ancient Egypt with a subsequent development through the art of most of Eurasia, often in forms that bear relatively little resemblance to the original. In ancient Greek and ancient Roman uses it is also known as the anthemion (from the Greek ανθέμιον, a flower). It is found in most artistic media, but especially as an architectural ornament, whether carved or painted, and painted on ceramics. It is very often a component of the design of a frieze or border. The complex evolution of the palmette was first traced by Alois Riegl in his Stilfragen of 1893. The half-palmette, bisected vertically, is also a very common motif, found in many mutated and vestigial forms, and especially important in the development of plant-based scroll ornament.

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