Greek Catholic Church of Croatia and Serbia

The Greek Catholic Church of Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Serbia is an Eastern Catholic Church sui iuris of the Byzantine Rite which is in full union with the Roman Catholic Church. It consists of the Eparchy of Križevci and the Eparchy of Saint Nicholas of Ruski Krstur. The Eparchy of Križevci has been headed by Bishop Nikola Kekić since his appointment in 2009 and the Eparchy of Saint Nicholas of Ruski Krstur has been headed by Bishop Đura Džudžar since his appointment in 2003 (until 2018 as Apostolic Exarch).

Greek Catholic Church of Croatia and Serbia
Serbian: Гркокатоличка црква у Србији
Croatian: Grkokatolička crkva u Hrvatskoj
ClassificationEastern Catholic
PolityEpiscopal
PopeFrancis
PrimateNikola Kekić

History

Križevačka katedrala 1
Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Križevci, Croatia
Ruski Krstur, Uniate church
Cathedral of St. Nicholas in Ruski Krstur, Serbia
Cerkev sv Cirila in Metoda Metlika
Byzantine Catholic Church of St. Cyril and Methodius in Metlika, Slovenia

Until 2001, the Greek Catholic Eparchy of Križevci had full jurisdiction over all Eastern Catholics of the Byzantine Rite throughout the entire territory of former Yugoslavia, including all of its successor states: Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro and Macedonia. During that time, it mostly gathered its faithful among the Croats in central and eastern Croatia, among the Rusyns or Ukrainians in eastern Croatia, northern Bosnia and northern Serbia and among Macedonians in Macedonia.

After the formation of independent successor states from what had been Yugoslavia, the process of administrative reorganization was initiated. In 2001, a separate Byzantine Catholic Apostolic Exarchate of Macedonia was formed for Greek Catholics in Macedonia. It was fully separated from the Eparchy of Križevci and proclaimed as directly subject only to the Holy See.[1]

In 2003, a new Apostolic Exarchate was created for Greek Catholics in Serbia and Montenegro, the Apostolic Exarchate of Serbia and Montenegro. Its first exarch Đura Džudžar (Ђура Џуџар) was appointed in 2003, with residence in Ruski Krstur. This exarchate remained in association with the Eparchy of Križevci.

After those changes, the jurisdiction of the Eparchy of Križevci was confined to Croatia, Slovenia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina.

In 2013, all Catholics of Byzantine Rite in Montenegro were entrusted to the local Latin Bishops, so the jurisdiction of Apostolic Exarchate of Serbia and Montenegro was reduced to Serbia only.[2] The Apostolic Exarchate of Serbia was elevated to the Eparchy of San Nicola di Ruski Krstur in December 2018. [3]

Liturgy and Extension

The liturgy is the Slavonic form of Byzantine Rite, using the Old Church Slavonic language and the Cyrillic alphabet.

The Eparchy of Križevci reported for the year 2010 a total of 21,509 faithful (in Croatia, Slovenia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina). At that time, the Apostolic Exarchate for Serbia and Montenegro reported 22,369 faithful.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis, 93 (2001) Archived April 30, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, p. 339.
  2. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis, 105 (2013) Archived 2014-07-23 at the Wayback Machine, p. 187.
  3. ^ Catholic Hierarchy web site
  4. ^ The Eastern Catholic Churches 2010

External links

Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Saint Nicholas of Ruski Krstur

The Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Saint Nicholas of Ruski Krstur (Serbian: Гркокатолички апостолски егзархат у Србији) is an ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Catholic Church for Eastern Catholics of the Byzantine Rite in Serbia. It was founded in 2003 as the "Greek Catholic Apostolic Exarchate of Serbia and Montenegro" and reduced to the territory of Serbia in 2013. Since 2003, head of the Eparchy is bishop Đura Džudžar.The Eparchy is a part of the Greek Catholic Church of Croatia and Serbia, together with the Greek Catholic Eparchy of Križevci in Croatia. In terms of jurisdiction, the Eparchy is exempt and directly subjected to the Holy See. There are no ecclesiastical provinces for it to belong to in the Greek Catholic Church of Croatia and Serbia, which lacks a Metropolitan of its own, since the Eparchy of Križevci (the only other jurisdiction in the Greek Catholic Church of Croatia and Serbia) is suffragan to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Zagreb.

Catholic particular churches and liturgical rites

A particular church (Latin: ecclesia particularis) is an ecclesiastical community of faithful headed by a bishop (or equivalent), as defined by Catholic canon law and ecclesiology. A liturgical rite depends on the bishop (i.e., the particular church).

Thus, though closely related, in this context "church" refers to the institution, and "rite" to its practices. There are two kinds of particular churches:

An autonomous particular church sui iuris: an aggregation of particular churches with shared, distinctive liturgical, spiritual, theological, and canonical emphases and traditions. The largest such autonomous particular church is the Latin Church, while the other 23 are referred to collectively as the Eastern Catholic Churches, some of which are headed by bishops who have the title and rank of Patriarch or Major Archbishop. In this context the descriptors autonomous (Greek: αὐτόνομος, translit. autónomos) and sui iuris (Latin) are synonymous, each meaning "of its own law".

A local particular church: a diocese (or eparchy) headed by a bishop (or equivalent), typically collected in a national polity under an episcopal conference. However, there are also other forms, including territorial abbacies, apostolic vicariates, apostolic prefectures, military ordinariates, personal ordinariates, and personal prelatures.

Croatian Catholic Church

Croatian Catholic Church can refer to:

Catholic Church in Croatia

Greek Catholic Church of Croatia and Serbia

Old Catholic Church of Croatia

Eastern Catholic Churches

The Eastern Catholic Churches or Oriental Catholic Churches, also called the Eastern-rite Catholic Churches, and in some historical cases Uniate Churches, are twenty-three Eastern Christian particular churches sui iuris in full communion with the Pope in Rome, as part of the worldwide Catholic Church. Headed by patriarchs, metropolitans, and major archbishops, the Eastern Catholic Churches are governed in accordance with the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches, although each church also has its own canons and laws on top of this, and the preservation of their own traditions is explicitly encouraged. The total membership of the various churches accounts for about 18 million, according to the Annuario Pontificio (the annual directory of the Catholic Church), thus making up about 1.5 percent of the Catholic Church, with the rest of its more than 1.2 billion members belonging to the Latin Church, also known as the Western Church or the Roman Catholic Church.

The Maronite Church is considered the only one of the Eastern Catholic Churches to have always remained in full communion with the Holy See, while most of the other churches unified from the 16th century onwards. However, the Melkite Catholic Church and the Italo-Albanian Greek Catholic Church also claim perpetual communion. The largest five churches based on membership are: the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (Byzantine Rite), the Syro-Malabar Church (East Syriac Rite), the Maronite Church (West Syriac Rite), the Melkite Catholic Church (Byzantine Rite), and the Armenian Catholic Church (Armenian Rite). These five churches account for about 80% of the Eastern Catholic Churches.

Full communion constitutes mutual sacramental sharing between the Eastern Catholic Churches and the Latin Church, including Eucharistic intercommunion. On the other hand, the liturgical traditions of the 23 Eastern Catholic churches, including Byzantine, Alexandrian, Armenian, East Syriac, and West Syriac, are shared with other Eastern Christian churches: the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, the Assyrian Church of the East, and the Ancient Church of the East. Although some theological issues divide the Eastern Catholic Churches from other Eastern Christian ones, they do admit members of the latter to the Eucharist and the other sacraments, as governed by Oriental canon law.Notably, many of the Eastern Catholic Churches take a different approach to clerical celibacy than the Latin Church does and allow the ordination of married men to the priesthood (although not to the episcopacy).

Eastern Catholic Churches have their origins in the Middle East, East Africa, Eastern Europe and India. However, since the 19th century, diaspora has spread to Western Europe, the Americas and Oceania in part because of persecution, where eparchies have been established to serve adherents alongside those of Latin Church dioceses. Latin Catholics in the Middle East, on the other hand, are traditionally cared for by the Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem.

Greek Catholic Church

The Greek Catholic Church refers to a number of Eastern Catholic Churches following the Byzantine (Greek) liturgy, considered collectively or individually.

The terms Greek Catholic, Greek-Catholic, Greek Catholic church and Greek-Catholic Church may refer to:

Individually, any 14 of the 23 Eastern Catholic Churches which use the Byzantine rite, a.k.a. Greek Rite:

the Albanian Greek Catholic Church

the Belarusian Greek Catholic Church

the Bulgarian Greek Catholic Church

the Greek Catholic Church of Croatia and Serbia

the Greek Byzantine Catholic Church, in Greece and Turkey

the Hungarian Greek Catholic Church

the Italo-Albanian Catholic Church

the Macedonian Greek Catholic Church

the Melkite Greek Catholic Church

the Romanian Greek Catholic Church (officially the Romanian Church United with Rome, Greek-Catholic)

the Russian Greek Catholic Church

the Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church

the Slovak Greek Catholic Church

the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church

Any other group of Eastern Catholics following the Byzantine rite:

the Georgian Byzantine-Rite Catholics

an Ordinariate for Eastern Catholic faithful without proper ordinary, in 6 countries

The Catholic Church in Greece, a Roman Catholic hierarchy following the Latin rite in the country of Greece

Greek Catholic Eparchy of Križevci

The Eparchy of Križevci is an eparchy (diocese) of the Catholic Church for Eastern Catholics of Byzantine Rite in part of the former Yugoslavia, with its seat in Križevci, Croatia. It is part of the Greek Catholic Church of Croatia and Serbia, an Eastern Catholic Church sui iuris of the Byzantine Rite which is in full union with the Roman Catholic Church. The Eparchy is currently headed by Bishop Nikola Kekić, who was appointed in 2009.The Eparchy has jurisdiction over Eastern Catholics of Byzantine Rite in Croatia, Slovenia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina. It mostly gathers its faithful among ethnic Croats in central and eastern Croatia, and among the Rusyns in eastern Slavonia, with a small Serbian minority. The liturgy used by the Eparchy is the Slavonic form of the Byzantine Rite, using the Old Church Slavonic language and the Cyrillic alphabet.

Oleksiy Bazyuk

Very Reverend Oleksiy Bazyuk (Ukrainian: Олексій Базюк; 26 March 1873 – 12 June 1952) was a Greek Catholic hierarch. He served as the single Apostolic Administrator of the Ruthenian Catholic Apostolic Administration of Bosnia-Hercegovina from its establishing on 9 October 1914 until its dissolution in 1925.

Đuro Smičiklas

Đuro Smičiklas (14 December 1815 – 20 April 1881) was a Greek-Catholic hierarch, the bishop from 1857 to 1881 of the Eastern Catholic Eparchy of Križevci (today part of the Greek Catholic Church of Croatia and Serbia).

Born in Reštovo, near Sošice, Austrian Empire (now Croatia) in 1815, he was ordained a priest on 11 April 1841 for the Eparchy of Križevci. Fr. Smičiklas was the parish priest in Novi Sad from 1849 to 1852 and canon in the Križevci Greek Catholic Cathedral from 1852 to 1857.He was confirmed as the Bishop by the Holy See on 21 December 1857. He was consecrated to the Episcopate on 21 March 1858. The principal consecrator was Archbishop Alexandru Sterca-Șuluțiu.He died in Križevci on 20 April 1881.

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