Greater Boston

Greater Boston is the metropolitan region of New England encompassing the municipality of Boston, the capital of the U.S. state of Massachusetts, and the most populous city in New England, as well as its surrounding areas. The region forms the northern arc of the US northeast megalopolis and as such, Greater Boston can be described either as a metropolitan statistical area (MSA), or as a broader combined statistical area (CSA). The MSA consists of most of the eastern third of Massachusetts, excluding the South Coast region and Cape Cod; while the CSA additionally includes the municipalities of Manchester (the largest city in the U.S. state of New Hampshire), Providence (the capital and largest city of the U.S. state of Rhode Island), Worcester, Massachusetts (the second largest city in New England), as well as the South Coast region and Cape Cod in Massachusetts. While the small footprint of the city of Boston itself only contains an estimated 685,094, the urbanization has extended well into surrounding areas; the CSA is one of two in Massachusetts, the only other being Greater Springfield; and is the only CSA-form statistical area in New England which crosses into three states (Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island).

Some of Greater Boston's most well-known contributions involve the region's higher education and medical institutions. Greater Boston has been influential upon American history and industry. The region and the state of Massachusetts are global leaders in biotechnology, engineering, higher education, finance, and maritime trade.[1]

Over 80% of Massachusetts' population lives in the Greater Boston metropolitan region. Greater Boston is ranked tenth in population among US metropolitan statistical areas, home to 4,732,161 people as of the 2014 US Census estimate, and sixth among combined statistical areas, with a population of 8,099,575.[2] The area has hosted many people and sites significant to American culture and history, particularly American literature,[3] politics, and the American Revolution.

Plymouth was the site of the first colony in New England, founded in 1620 by the Pilgrims, passengers of the Mayflower. In 1692, the town of Salem and surrounding areas experienced one of America's most infamous cases of mass hysteria, the Salem witch trials.[4] In the late 18th century, Boston became known as the "Cradle of Liberty"[5] for the agitation there that led to the American Revolution.

The Greater Boston region has played a powerful commercial and cultural role in the history of the United States. Before the American Civil War, the region was a center for the abolitionist, temperance,[6] and transcendentalist[7] movements.[8] In 2004, Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to legally recognize same-sex marriage as a result of the decision of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in Boston.[9] Many prominent American political dynasties have hailed from the Boston region, including the Adams and Kennedy families.

Harvard University in Cambridge is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States,[10] with the largest financial endowment of any university,[11] and whose Law School has spawned a contemporaneous majority of United States Supreme Court Justices.[12] Kendall Square in Cambridge has been called "the most innovative square mile on the planet", in reference to the high concentration of entrepreneurial start-ups and quality of innovation which have emerged in the vicinity of the square since 2010.[13][14] Both Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, also in Cambridge, have been ranked among the most highly regarded academic institutions in the world.[15]

Boston Combined Statistical Area

Boston–Worcester–Providence
Boston
Location of Boston Combined Statistical Area
Coordinates: 42°21′29″N 71°03′49″W / 42.35817°N 71.06369°WCoordinates: 42°21′29″N 71°03′49″W / 42.35817°N 71.06369°W
Country United States
State(s)
Principal cities
Population
 (2014)
 • Total4,732,161 (MSA) or 8,099,575 (CSA)
 • Rank
Time zoneEST
Area code(s)617, 781, 857, 339, 978, 508, 351, 774, 603, 401

Definitions

Greater Boston Lg
Light Blue represents the area in Massachusetts known as Greater Boston, while Dark Blue represents the Metro-Boston area and Red represents the City of Boston.

Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)

The most restrictive definition of the Greater Boston area is the region administered by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC).[16] The MAPC is a regional planning organization created by the Massachusetts legislature to oversee transportation infrastructure and economic development concerns in the Boston area. The MAPC includes 101 cities and towns that are grouped into eight subregions. These include most of the area within the region's outer circumferential highway, I-495. In 2013, the population of the MAPC district was 3.2 million, which was 48% of the total population of Massachusetts,[17] in an area of 1,422 square miles (3,680 km2),[16] of which 39% is forested and an additional 11% is water, wetland, or other open space.[18]

The eight subregions and their principal towns are: Inner Core (Boston), Minuteman (Route 2 corridor), MetroWest (Framingham), North Shore (Lynn), North Suburban (Woburn), South Shore (Route 3 corridor), SouthWest (Franklin), and Three Rivers (Norwood).

Notably excluded from the MAPC and its partner planning body, the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization, are the Merrimack Valley cities of Lowell, Lawrence, and Haverhill, much of Plymouth County, and all of Bristol County; these areas have their own regional planning bodies. Bristol County is part of the Greater Boston CSA, as part of the Providence MSA.

New England City and Town Area (NECTA)

MIT Charles River aerial
Cambridge and Boston; MIT and Kendall Square in the foreground, and Boston's Financial District in the background

The urbanized area surrounding Boston serves as the core of a definition used by the US Census Bureau known as the New England city and town area (NECTA). The set of towns containing the core urbanized area plus surrounding towns with strong social and economic ties to the core area is defined as the Boston–Cambridge–Nashua, MA–NH Metropolitan NECTA.[19] The Boston NECTA is further subdivided into several NECTA divisions, which are listed below. The Boston, Framingham, and Peabody NECTA divisions together correspond roughly to the MAPC area. The total population of the Boston NECTA was 4,540,941 (as of 2000).

  • Boston–Cambridge–Newton, MA NECTA Division (92 towns)
  • Framingham, MA NECTA Division (12 towns)
  • Peabody–Salem–Beverly, MA NECTA Division (4 towns)
  • Brockton–Bridgewater–Easton, MA NECTA Division (Old Colony region) (8 towns)
  • Haverhill–Newburyport–Amesbury, MA–NH NECTA Division (Merrimack Valley region) (21 towns)
  • Lawrence–Methuen–Salem, MA–NH NECTA Division (part of Merrimack Valley region) (4 towns)
  • Lowell–Billerica–Chelmsford, MA–NH NECTA Division (Northern Middlesex region) (15 towns)
  • Nashua, NH–MA NECTA Division (21 towns)
  • Taunton–Middleborough–Norton, MA NECTA Division (part of Southeastern region) (9 towns)
  • Lynn–Saugus–Marblehead, MA NECTA Division (5 towns)

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850650,357
1860830,99827.8%
1870978,34617.7%
18801,205,43923.2%
18901,515,68425.7%
19001,890,12224.7%
19102,260,76219.6%
19202,563,12313.4%
19302,866,56711.8%
19402,926,6502.1%
19503,186,9708.9%
19603,516,43510.3%
19703,918,09211.4%
19803,938,5850.5%
19904,133,8955.0%
20004,391,3446.2%
20104,552,4023.7%
Est. 20144,732,1613.9%
US Decennial Census

An alternative definition defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget, using counties as building blocks instead of towns, is the Boston–Cambridge–Newton, MA–NH Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is further subdivided into three metropolitan divisions. The metropolitan statistical area had a total population of approximately 4,732,161 as of 2014 and is the tenth-largest in the United States. The components of the metropolitan area with their estimated 2012 populations are listed below.

  • Boston–Cambridge–Newton, MA–NH Metropolitan Statistical Area (4,640,802)

Combined Statistical Area (CSA)

Providence, RI skyline edit
Providence, Rhode Island

A wider functional metropolitan area based on commuting patterns is also defined by the Office of Management and Budget as the Boston–Worcester–Providence combined statistical area. This area consists of the metropolitan areas of Manchester, Worcester, Providence, as well as Cape Cod, in addition to greater Boston. The total population as of 2014 for the extended region was estimated at 8,099,575. The following areas, along with the above MSA, are included in the combined statistical area, with their estimated 2012 populations:

Principal cities and towns

Winthrop ma
Winthrop, MA
Cities and towns

Boston metropolitan area

The Census Bureau defines the following as principal cities in the Boston NECTA[19] using criteria developed for what the Office of Management and Budget calls a Core Based Statistical Area:[20]

Largest cities and towns

Cities and towns in the Boston CSA with at least 50,000 residents:

Rank City 2000
population
2010
population
2014
population[21]
% change
(2010 to 2014)
1 Boston 589,141 617,594 655,884 +6.20%
2 Worcester 172,648 181,045 183,016 +1.09%
3 Providence 173,618 178,042 179,154 +0.62%
4 Manchester 107,006 109,565 110,448 +0.81%
5 Lowell 105,167 106,519 109,945 +3.22%
6 Cambridge 101,355 105,162 109,694 +4.31%
7 New Bedford 93,768 95,072 94,845 −0.24%
8 Brockton 94,304 93,810 94,779 +1.03%
9 Quincy 88,025 92,271 93,397 +1.22%
10 Lynn 89,050 90,329 92,137 +2.00%
11 Fall River 91,938 88,857 88,712 −0.16%
12 Newton 83,829 85,146 88,287 +3.69%
13 Nashua 86,605 86,494 87,259 +0.88%
14 Warwick 85,808 82,672 81,963 −0.86%
15 Cranston 79,269 80,387 81,037 +0.81%
16 Somerville 77,478 75,754 78,901 +4.15%
17 Lawrence 72,043 76,377 78,197 +2.38%
18 Pawtucket 72,958 71,148 71,499 +0.49%
19 Framingham 66,910 68,318 70,068 +2.56%
20 Waltham 59,226 60,632 63,014 +3.93%
21 Haverhill 58,969 60,879 62,488 +2.64%
22 Malden 56,340 59,450 60,859 +2.37%
23 Brookline 57,107 58,732 59,115 +0.65%
24 Plymouth 51,701 56,468 57,463 +1.76%
25 Medford 55,765 56,173 57,437 +2.25%
26 Taunton 55,976 55,874 56,544 +1.20%
27 Weymouth 53,988 53,743 55,643 +3.54%
28 Revere 47,283 51,755 54,157 +4.64%
29 Peabody 48,129 51,251 52,376 +2.20%
30 Methuen 43,789 47,255 52,044 +10.13%

Demographics

St. Patrick Day's Parade, Scituate MA
St. Patrick's Day Parade in Scituate, Massachusetts, in Plymouth County, the municipality with the highest percentage identifying Irish ancestry in the United States, at 47.5% in 2010.[22] Irish Americans constitute the largest ethnicity in Greater Boston.
Boston Chinatown Paifang
Boston's Chinatown, with its paifang gate, is home to many Chinese and also Vietnamese restaurants.
Were a gay and happy family wagon
Boston gay pride march, held annually in June

Population density

The most densely populated census tracts in the Boston CSA (2010):[23]

Rank City or neighborhood Census tract Population Population density
/sq mi /km2
1 Fenway–Kenmore 10404 5,817 110,108 285,180
2 Fenway–Kenmore 10403 3,003 87,828 227,470
3 Fenway–Kenmore 10408 1,426 85,137 220,500
4 Beacon Hill 202 3,649 80,851 209,400
5 North End 301 1,954 66,288 171,690
6 North End 302 1,665 64,642 167,420
7 North End 304 2,451 58,435 151,350
8 Cambridge 3539 7,090 56,819 147,160
9 Back Bay 10801 2,783 56,534 146,420
10 East Boston 502 5,231 55,692 144,240

Race and ethnicity

The 40 most diverse Census tracts in the Boston CSA:[23]

The 40 census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Hispanic or Latino:[23]

Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Black American:[23]

Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Asian American:[23]

Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Irish American:[24]

Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Italian American:[25]

Census tracts in the Boston CSA with the highest percentage of residents who identify as Portuguese American:[26]

Census tracts in the Boston CSA with French or French Canadian listed as first ancestry:[27]

Other

Greater Boston has a sizable Jewish community, estimated at between 210,000 people,[28][29] and 261,000[30] or 5–6% of the Greater Boston metro population, compared with about 2% for the nation as a whole. Contrary to national trends, the number of Jews in Greater Boston has been growing, fueled by the fact that 60% of children in Jewish mixed-faith families are raised Jewish, compared with roughly one in three nationally.[28]

The City of Boston also has one of the largest LGBT populations per capita. It ranks fifth of all major cities in the country (behind San Francisco, and slightly behind Seattle, Atlanta, and Minneapolis respectively), with 12.3% of the city identifying as gay, lesbian, or bisexual.[31]

County 2016 Estimate 2010 Census Change Area Density
Essex County, Massachusetts 779,018 743,159 +4.83% 492.56 sq mi (1,275.7 km2) 1,582/sq mi (611/km2)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 1,589,774 1,503,085 +5.77% 817.82 sq mi (2,118.1 km2) 1,944/sq mi (751/km2)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 697,181 670,850 +3.93% 396.11 sq mi (1,025.9 km2) 1,760/sq mi (680/km2)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 513,565 494,919 +3.77% 659.07 sq mi (1,707.0 km2) 779/sq mi (301/km2)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 784,230 722,023 +8.62% 58.15 sq mi (150.6 km2) 13,486/sq mi (5,207/km2)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 303,251 295,223 +2.72% 694.72 sq mi (1,799.3 km2) 437/sq mi (169/km2)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 127,428 123,143 +3.48% 368.97 sq mi (955.6 km2) 345/sq mi (133/km2)
Total 4,794,447 4,552,402 +5.32% 3,487.40 sq mi (9,032.3 km2) 1,375/sq mi (531/km2)

Higher education

Harvard University (top) and MIT (bottom) are both widely regarded as in the top handful of universities worldwide for academic research in various disciplines.[15]

HarvardWidenerLibrary
MIT Building 10 and the Great Dome, Cambridge MA

A long established center of higher education, the area includes many community colleges, two-year schools, and internationally prominent undergraduate and graduate institutions. The graduate schools include highly regarded schools of law, medicine, business, technology, international relations, public health, education, and religion. Greater Boston contains seven R1 Research Institutions as per the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. This is, by far, the highest number of such institutions in a single Metropolitan Statistical Area in the United States.

Selected statistics

Changes in house prices for the Greater Boston area are publicly tracked on a regular basis using the Case–Shiller index; the statistic is published by Standard & Poor's and is also a component of S&P's 10-city composite index of the value of the residential real estate market.

Major companies

References:[32][33][34][35]

Sports

Club Sport League Stadium Established League titles
Boston Breakers Soccer National Women's Soccer League Soldiers Field Soccer Stadium (Boston) 2008
Boston Bruins Ice hockey National Hockey League TD Garden (Boston) 1924 6 Stanley Cups
7 Eastern Conference Titles
Boston Cannons Lacrosse Major League Lacrosse Harvard Stadium (Boston) 2001 1 MLL Championship
Boston Celtics Basketball National Basketball Association TD Garden (Boston) 1946 17 NBA Championships
21 Eastern Conference Titles
Boston Lobsters Team tennis World TeamTennis Manchester Athletic Club (Manchester-by-the-Sea) 2005 (1974)
Boston Pride Ice hockey National Women's Hockey League Bright Hockey Center (Boston) 2015 1 Isobel Cup
Boston Red Sox Baseball Major League Baseball (American League) Fenway Park (Boston) 1901 9-time MLB World Series Champions
14 American League Pennants
New England Patriots Football National Football League (American Football Conference) Gillette Stadium (Foxboro) 1960
(as Boston Patriots)
6-time Super Bowl Champions
9-time AFC Champions
New England Revolution Soccer Major League Soccer Gillette Stadium (Foxboro) 1995 1 US Open Cup
1 SuperLiga

Annual sporting events include:

Transportation

Interstates

U.S. Routes

State Highways

Bridges and tunnels

Airports

Rail and bus

MBTA Commuter Rail and funding district map
The MBTA district, with Commuter Rail lines in purple

The first railway line in the United States was in Quincy. See Neponset River.

The following Regional Transit Authorities have bus service that connects with MBTA commuter rail stations:

Ocean transportation

Salem Ferry
The Salem Ferry, 92 ft. Catamaran is photographed approaching its dock off Blaney Street at the Salem Maritime National Historic Site in Salem, Massachusetts, United States.

Geography

Climate

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Mean monthly maxima and minima (i.e. the expected highest and lowest temperature readings at any point during the year or given month) calculated based on data at said location from 1981 to 2010.
  2. ^ Official records for Concord were kept at downtown from September 1868 to April 1941 and at Concord Municipal Airport since May 1941; snow records date from December 1942. For more information, see ThreadEx
  3. ^ Mean monthly maxima and minima (i.e. the expected highest and lowest temperature readings at any point during the year or given month) calculated based on data at said location from 1981 to 2010.
  4. ^ Official records for Boston were kept at downtown from January 1872 to December 1935, and at Logan Airport (KBOS) since January 1936.[40]
  5. ^ Mean monthly maxima and minima (i.e. the expected highest and lowest temperature readings at any point during the year or given month) calculated based on data at said location from 1981 to 2010.
  6. ^ Official records for Providence kept at downtown from November 1904 to May 1932 and at T. F. Green Airport since June 1932.[44]

References

  1. ^ "Housing and Economic Development:Key Industries". mass.gov. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  2. ^ "2014 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 18, 2016.
  3. ^ Will Joyner (9 April 1999). "Where Literary Legends Took Shape Around Boston". The New York Times. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  4. ^ "The 1692 Salem Witch Trials". SalemWitchTrialsMuseum.com. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  5. ^ "Faneuil Hall". Celebrateboston.com. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  6. ^ "The Temperance Issue in the Election of 1840: Massachusetts". Teachushistory.org. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  7. ^ Packer, Barbara. The Transcendentalists. University of Georgia Press; First edition (April 25, 2007). ISBN 978-0820329581.
  8. ^ "Images of the Antislavery Movement in Massachusetts". Masshist.org. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  9. ^ "Massachusetts court strikes down ban on same-sex marriage". Reuters. November 18, 2003. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  10. ^ "History of Harvard University". Harvard University. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  11. ^ Tamar Lewin (January 28, 2015). "Harvard's Endowment Remains Biggest of All". The New York Times. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  12. ^ Richard Wolf (March 16, 2016). "Meet Merrick Garland, Obama's Supreme Court nominee". USA Today. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  13. ^ "Kendall Square Initiative". MIT. Retrieved December 1, 2016.
  14. ^ Lelund Cheung. "When a neighborhood is crowned the most innovative square mile in the world, how do you keep it that way?". Boston Globe Media Partners, LLC. Retrieved December 1, 2016.
  15. ^ a b [1] Accessed May 9, 2016.
  16. ^ a b "About MAPC". Metropolitan Area Planning Council. Archived from the original on 2007-02-21. Retrieved 2007-05-14.
  17. ^ "Metropolitan Area Planning Council Strategic Plan 2015–2020" (PDF). Metropolitan Area Planning Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-10-11. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  18. ^ "Transportation Plan – Overview". Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization. 2009. Archived from the original on August 29, 2008. Retrieved 2009-09-27.
  19. ^ a b "Principal cities of New England city and town areas (NECTAs)" (XLS spreadsheet). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved April 26, 2015.
  20. ^ "Standards for Defining Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas" (PDF). Office of Management and Budget. December 27, 2000. Retrieved September 14, 2009.
  21. ^ "City and Town Population for 2013". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2016-01-19. Retrieved September 19, 2014.
  22. ^ Jane Walsh (November 25, 2015). "The most Irish town in America is named using US census data". Irish Central. Retrieved May 8, 2016.
  23. ^ a b c d e "Mapping the 2010 U.S. Census". U.S. Census Bureau.
  24. ^ "Irish as First Ancestry Population Percentage Rank of Census Tract within 100 miles of Zip Code 02176". Usa.com. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  25. ^ "Italian as First Ancestry Population Percentage Rank of Census Tract within 100 miles of Zip Code 02176". Usa.com. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  26. ^ [2]
  27. ^ "French as First Ancestry Population Percentage Rank of Census Tract within 100 miles of Zip Code 02176". Usa.com. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  28. ^ a b Michael Paulson (2006-11-10). "Jewish population in region rises". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2009-11-29.
  29. ^ "Cities with the Largest Jewish Population in the Diaspora". adherents.com. Retrieved 2009-11-29.
  30. ^ "Metro Area Membership Report". The Association of Religion Data Archives. Retrieved 2009-11-29.
  31. ^ "12.9% in Seattle are gay or bisexual, second only to S.F., study says". The Seattle Times. The Seattle Times Company. 2006. Retrieved 2009-05-01.
  32. ^ "2009 Globe 100 – Top Massachusetts-based employers". The Boston Globe. 2010-01-19. Archived from the original on May 22, 2009.
  33. ^ [3] Archived March 10, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  34. ^ "Top Companies in Massachusetts on the Inc. 5000 - Inc.com". Inc.com. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  35. ^ [4] Archived October 10, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  36. ^ "Who We Are & About Us - Vistaprint". News.vistaprint.com. Archived from the original on 18 October 2014. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  37. ^ "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2018-02-22.
  38. ^ "Station Name: NH CONCORD MUNI AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2016-09-11.
  39. ^ "WMO Climate Normals for CONCORD MUNICIPAL AP, NH 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-03-11.
  40. ^ ThreadEx
  41. ^ "Station Name: MA BOSTON LOGAN INTL AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2013-03-24.
  42. ^ "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2017-02-25.
  43. ^ "WMO Climate Normals for BOSTON/LOGAN INT'L AIRPORT, MA 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-03-11.
  44. ^ ThreadEx
  45. ^ "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2016-04-17.
  46. ^ "Station Name: RI PROVIDENCE T F GREEN AP". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2018-02-22.
  47. ^ "WMO Climate Normals for PROVIDENCE/GREEN STATE, RI 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-03-11.

Further reading

  • Wilson, Susan (2005). The Literary Trail of Greater Boston: A Tour of Sites in Boston, Cambridge, and Concord, Revised Edition. Commonwealth Editions. ISBN 1-889833-67-3. An informative guidebook, with facts and data about literary figures, publishers, bookstores, libraries, and other historic sites on the newly designated Literary Trail of Greater Boston.
  • Warner, Sam, Jr. (2001). Greater Boston: Adapting Regional Traditions to the Present. University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 0-8122-1769-1.
Boston

Boston is the capital and most populous city of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States. The city proper covers 48 square miles (124 km2) with an estimated population of 694,583 in 2018, making it also the most populous city in New England. Boston is the seat of Suffolk County as well, although the county government was disbanded on July 1, 1999. The city is the economic and cultural anchor of a substantially larger metropolitan area known as Greater Boston, a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) home to a census-estimated 4.8 million people in 2016 and ranking as the tenth-largest such area in the country. As a combined statistical area (CSA), this wider commuting region is home to some 8.2 million people, making it the sixth-largest in the United States.Boston is one of the oldest cities in the United States, founded on the Shawmut Peninsula in 1630 by Puritan settlers from England. It was the scene of several key events of the American Revolution, such as the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, the Battle of Bunker Hill, and the Siege of Boston. Upon gaining U.S. independence from Great Britain, it continued to be an important port and manufacturing hub as well as a center for education and culture. The city has expanded beyond the original peninsula through land reclamation and municipal annexation. Its rich history attracts many tourists, with Faneuil Hall alone drawing more than 20 million visitors per year. Boston's many firsts include the United States' first public park (Boston Common, 1634), first public or state school (Boston Latin School, 1635) and first subway system (Tremont Street Subway, 1897).The Boston area's many colleges and universities make it an international center of higher education, including law, medicine, engineering, and business, and the city is considered to be a world leader in innovation and entrepreneurship, with nearly 2,000 startups. Boston's economic base also includes finance, professional and business services, biotechnology, information technology, and government activities. Households in the city claim the highest average rate of philanthropy in the United States; businesses and institutions rank among the top in the country for environmental sustainability and investment. The city has one of the highest costs of living in the United States as it has undergone gentrification, though it remains high on world livability rankings.

Breakheart Reservation

Breakheart Reservation is a public recreation area covering 652 acres (264 ha) in the towns of Saugus and Wakefield, Massachusetts. The reservation features a hardwood forest, two freshwater lakes, a winding stretch of the Saugus River, and scenic views of Boston and rural New England from rocky hilltops. The park is managed by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.

Emily Rooney

Emily Rooney (born January 17, 1950) is an American journalist, TV talk show and radio host and former news producer. She is currently host of the weekly program Beat the Press on WGBH-TV. From 1997 to 2014, she was also the host and executive editor of Greater Boston, which was also later rebroadcast on the Boston-based WGBH radio station. She also hosted the Emily Rooney Show on WGBH radio.

WGBH announced on May 29, 2014 that Emily Rooney would be stepping down from her host position on the Greater Boston TV show, which she created, to become a special correspondent for the program. (She has remained in her role as moderator on Beat the Press.) Rooney had been with the program since 1997. Her final Greater Boston show as its host was Thursday, December 18, 2014, after 18 years.

Kent County, Rhode Island

Kent County is a county located in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. As of the 2010 census, the population was 166,158 making it the second-most populous county in Rhode Island. The county was formed in 1750 from the southern third of Providence County. It was named after the county of Kent, England. Kent County, like other counties in Rhode Island, no longer has governmental functions (other than as court administrative and sheriff corrections boundaries). Kent County is included in the Providence-Warwick, RI-MA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn constitutes a portion of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Lynn Fells Parkway

Lynn Fells Parkway is a parkway in Greater Boston, Massachusetts, in the United States. It is maintained by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. The road runs from the end of Fellsway East in Stoneham, eastward through Melrose, and ends in Saugus at US Route 1. The parkway serves as a connector between the Middlesex Fells Reservation and Breakheart Reservation.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Massachusetts

This is a list of properties and districts in Massachusetts listed on the National Register of Historic Places. There are over 4,200 listings in the state, representing about 5% of all NRHP listings nationwide and the second-most of any U.S. state, behind only New York. Listings appear in all 14 Massachusetts counties.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 17, 2019.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Medford, Massachusetts

This is a list of places and properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Medford, Massachusetts.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 17, 2019.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Milton, Massachusetts

This is a list of properties and historic districts in Milton, Massachusetts, that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The locations of National Register properties and districts (at least for all showing latitude and longitude coordinates below) may be seen in an online map by clicking on "Map of all coordinates".

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 17, 2019.

Newport County, Rhode Island

Newport County is one of five counties located in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. As of the 2010 census, the population was 82,888. It is also one of the seven regions of Rhode Island. The county was created in 1703. Like all of the counties in Rhode Island, Newport County no longer has any governmental functions (other than as court administrative and sheriff corrections boundaries). All of those functions in Rhode Island are now carried out either by the state government, or by the cities and towns of Rhode Island. Newport County is included in the Providence-Warwick, RI-MA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is in turn constitutes a portion of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Newton, Massachusetts

Newton is a suburban city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. It is approximately 7 miles (11 km) west of downtown Boston and is bordered by Boston's Brighton and West Roxbury neighborhoods to the east and south, respectively, and by the suburb of Brookline to the east, the suburbs of Watertown and Waltham to the north, and Weston, Wellesley and Needham to the west. Rather than having a single city center, Newton resembles a patchwork of thirteen villages. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the population of Newton was 85,146, making it the eleventh largest city in the state.

Providence County, Rhode Island

Providence County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. As of the 2010 census, the county's population was 626,667, or 59.5% of the state's population. Providence County contains the city of Providence, the state capital of Rhode Island and the county's (and state's) most populous city, with an estimated 179,219 residents in 2016. Providence County is included in the Providence-Warwick, RI-MA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn constitutes a portion of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area. In 2010, the center of population of Rhode Island was located in Providence County, in the city of Cranston.

Providence metropolitan area

The Providence metropolitan area is a region extending into eight counties in two states, and is the 38th largest metropolitan area in the United States. Anchored by the city of Providence, Rhode Island, it has an estimated population of 1,622,520, exceeding that of Rhode Island by slightly over 60%. The area covers almost all of Rhode Island. 38 of the 39 municipalities in the state are included. Only Westerly is not. The Providence Metropolitan Statistical Area also extends into southern Massachusetts with an average population density of 2300 per mi² (888 per km²). Its Gross Metropolitan Product is the country's 42nd largest at $64.7 billion, just above the Gross State Product of the entire state of Hawaii. Since 2006, the Providence metropolitan area has been officially included in the Greater Boston Combined Statistical Area (CSA), the sixth-largest CSA in the country, with over 8 million residents.

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

Rockingham County is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2010 census, the population was 295,223, making it the second-most populous county in New Hampshire. The county seat is Brentwood. Rockingham County constitutes a portion of the Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Spirit of Adventure Council

The Spirit of Adventure Council is a regional council of the Boy Scouts of America. It serves the greater Boston, Massachusetts area.

Strafford County, New Hampshire

Strafford County is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2010 census, the population was 123,143. Its county seat is Dover. Strafford County was one of the five original counties identified for New Hampshire in 1769. It was named after William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford in the mistaken belief that he was the ancestor of governor John Wentworth – although they were distantly related, William had no descendants. The county was organized at Dover in 1771. In 1840, the size of the original county was reduced with the creation of Belknap County. Strafford County constitutes a portion of the Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

Suffolk County is a county in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in the United States. As of 2018, the population was 807,252 making it the fourth-most populous county in Massachusetts. The traditional county seat is Boston, the state capital and the largest city in Massachusetts. The county government was abolished in late 1999, and so Suffolk County today functions only as an administrative subdivision of state government and a set of communities grouped together for some statistical purposes. Suffolk County constitutes the core of the Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Trolleybuses in Greater Boston

The Boston-area trolleybus (or, as known locally, trackless trolley) system forms part of the public transportation network serving Greater Boston in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. It opened on April 11, 1936, and since 1964 has been operated by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA). It currently includes two physically isolated networks: one serving the towns of Cambridge, Belmont, and Watertown, the other – the Silver Line (Waterfront) – located in the city of Boston proper. Prior to 1964, several additional trolleybus lines were in operation in Boston proper. Measured by fleet size, the system was the third-largest trolleybus system in the United States at its peak (end of 1952), with only the Chicago and Atlanta systems having more trolleybuses than Boston's 463.In the present system, four routes fan out from the Harvard Bus Tunnel at Harvard Square station, running through Cambridge, Belmont, and Watertown. Those lines are the remains of a once-extensive system of trackless trolleys in the area, which was largely formed from former streetcar lines. Additionally, the 2004-opened Silver Line (Waterfront) is a bus rapid transit service using dual-mode buses which run as trolleybuses in the Waterfront Tunnel.

Truman Parkway

The Truman Parkway is a historic parkway in Milton and southern Boston, Massachusetts. It runs along the southern boundary of a portion of the Neponset River Reservation and serves as a connection between the Neponset Valley Parkway and the Blue Hills Parkway. The parkway was built in 1931 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2005.

Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway

The Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway (referred to locally as the VFW Parkway) is a historic parkway in Boston, Massachusetts and two adjacent towns. The southern terminus of the parkway is at Washington Street in Dedham, from where it travels north and then east, ending at a junction with Centre Street, near the Arnold Arboretum. It passes through a small corner of Brookline just west of its junction with the West Roxbury Parkway. Most of its length, from Spring Street in West Roxbury to its eastern end, is administered by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), a successor to the Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) which oversaw the road's construction. The parkway was built in stages between 1930 and 1942, and was designed to provide a parkway connection from the Upper Charles River Reservation to other MDC parks via the West Roxbury Parkway. The DCR portion of the road was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. The road formerly carried the designation for U.S. Route 1.

Rank City or neighborhood Census tract Population % White % Black % Hispanic % Asian % multiracial or other
1 Dorchester 916 3,138 12 32 15 26 14
2 Pawtucket 161 4,607 28 24 28 1 18
3 Pawtucket 151 4,472 24 24 29 1 23
4 Pawtucket 164 4,938 29 26 21 2 20
5 Dorchester 912 3,234 30 24 22 6 18
6 Dorchester 92101 6,451 30 22 11 31 6
7 Brockton 5115 4,308 21 32 13 2 32
8 Brockton 511 3,040 28 33 15 1 24
9 New Bedford 6519 1,942 26 11 33 1 29
10 Mission Hill 80801 3,885 32 20 35 10 2
11 Pawtucket 154 2,258 35 20 35 0 11
12 Brockton 5114 3,716 24 36 14 2 23
13 Brockton 5109 2,531 24 36 16 1 24
14 Brockton 5103 3,798 23 38 15 2 24
15 Brockton 5104 3,706 19 38 15 2 25
16 Dorchester 90901 3,730 38 18 21 20 4
17 Worcester 733 3,762 38 10 37 12 4
18 Providence 26 3,098 23 22 39 10 6
19 Malden 3415 4,780 39 23 14 19 5
20 Cambridge 3524 2,126 27 39 16 12 5
21 South End 71202 3,131 39 19 24 15 3
22 Brockton 511301 5,334 39 31 11 2 17
23 Providence 15 2,994 28 13 41 14 4
24 South Boston 61 3,098 41 15 29 11 4
25 Lynn 2072 2,939 30 12 42 13 2
26 Cambridge 3549 6,058 35 30 9 20 5
27 South Boston 61101 2,232 20 21 42 14 2
28 Brockton 5116 7,211 42 29 10 2 16
29 Roxbury 801 3,350 15 43 28 1 11
30 Lowell 3114 5,986 44 11 14 26 5
31 Brockton 5108 6,339 18 44 12 2 22
32 Mission Hill 81001 4,890 45 14 19 19 2
33 Malden 3418 6,554 46 20 13 16 5
34 South Boston 607 1,893 19 20 46 10 5
35 Brockton 5107 5,656 46 31 8 4 11
36 Brockton 5112 4,849 47 26 11 1 13
37 Somerville 351404 4,289 47 7 22 13 11
38 Lynn 2071 3,513 18 11 48 19 3
39 Framingham 383101 4,923 23 10 48 1 18
40 Mission Hill 811 4,091 48 21 15 13 2
Rank City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Hispanic or Latino
1 Lawrence 2525 3,810 94
2 Lawrence 2509 2,193 93
3 Lawrence 2504 3,858 90
4 Lawrence 2503 2,101 89
5 Lawrence 2513 3,721 89
6 Lawrence 2512 1,356 86
7 Lawrence 2507 4,756 86
8 Lawrence 251 1,782 85
9 Chelsea 1602 4,043 83
10 Lawrence 2506 5,599 83
11 Lawrence 2514 5,053 77
12 Chelsea 160101 7,551 76
13 Lawrence 2501 2,329 75
14 Lawrence 2516 5,977 74
15 Lawrence 2511 2,937 73
16 Lawrence 2502 5,524 72
17 Chelsea 1604 2,716 71
18 Chelsea 160501 5,604 71
19 Providence 16 8,540 70
20 Lawrence 2515 6,149 70
21 Worcester 732001 3,327 67
22 East Boston 506 2,063 67
23 East Boston 502 5,231 66
24 East Boston 507 4,504 65
25 East Boston 50901 4,165 65
26 Providence 2 6,452 64
27 Providence 4 3,761 64
28 Providence 14 6,693 63
29 Providence 5 3,040 63
30 Central Falls 11 5,534 63
31 Lawrence 2508 6,932 63
32 Chelsea 160502 4,460 62
33 Methuen 2524 4,175 62
34 Providence 17 3,744 62
35 Providence 18 7,114 61
36 Central Falls 111 4,176 61
37 East Boston 50101 5,115 61
38 Lawrence 2517 5,145 61
39 Providence 3 7,714 60
40 Central Falls 108 4,763 59
Rank City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Black
1 Mattapan 101101 3,115 84
2 Mattapan 101102 4,396 84
3 Mattapan 101001 5,480 83
4 Mattapan 1003 3,303 80
5 Mattapan 1002 2,787 78
6 Mattapan 101002 4,979 77
7 Dorchester 923 2,893 77
8 Roxbury 82 2,815 74
9 Roxbury 817 3,820 71
10 Hyde Park 1404 7,650 71
11 Roxbury 901 4,571 71
12 Dorchester 919 3,860 70
13 Dorchester 1004 4,865 68
14 Roxbury 819 3,115 66
15 Roxbury 924 5,277 66
16 Roxbury 818 2,898 65
17 Mattapan 1001 5,510 64
18 Roxbury 815 2,134 62
19 Roxbury 821 5,025 62
20 Roxbury 803 1,769 60
21 Roxbury 903 3,179 58
22 Dorchester 1009 4,072 58
23 Dorchester 1005 5,909 55
24 Hyde Park 1403 6,382 54
25 Dorchester 92 4,945 54
26 Roxbury 902 2,233 53
27 Dorchester 918 3,452 52
28 Roxbury 904 3,659 52
29 Roxbury 814 3,003 50
30 Roxbury 80401 2,710 50
31 Roslindale 140106 1,901 49
32 Dorchester 917 3,069 47
33 Dorchester 914 2,741 46
34 Brockton 5108 6,339 44
35 Roxbury 805 3,096 44
36 Roxbury 801 3,350 43
37 Randolph 420302 7,703 42
38 Roxbury 813 4,760 42
39 Dorchester 922 3,349 42
40 Randolph 420202 6,303 40
Rank City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Asian
1 South End 70402 1,723 70
2 Chinatown 702 5,218 58
3 Lowell 3112 3,267 55
4 Lowell 3118 3,513 54
5 Lowell 3117 5,098 47
6 Quincy 417502 4,639 45
7 Quincy 4172 8,182 44
8 Malden 3413 5,439 39
9 Lowell 3113 4,057 38
10 Westborough 742402 3,026 38
11 Quincy 417501 5,004 37
12 Cambridge 353102 5,040 36
13 Quincy 417802 3,150 35
14 Lowell 3111 2,410 34
15 Lowell 3115 2,974 33
16 Dorchester 92101 6,451 31
17 Quincy 417601 5,196 30
18 Fenway–Kenmore 10103 4,569 29
19 Quincy 4180002 7,020 28
20 Quincy 417602 5,155 28
21 Chinatown/Leather District/Downtown 70101 5,902 27
22 Cambridge 3539 7,090 27
23 Lowell 3114 5,986 26
24 Lowell 3116 5,295 26
25 Lowell 3107 4,441 26
26 Quincy 4171 4,264 26
27 Dorchester 916 3,138 26
28 Malden 3412 6,857 25
29 Malden 341102 4,564 25
30 Malden 341101 3,675 25
31 Acton 363102 5,909 25
32 Dorchester 911 4,861 25
33 Allston-Brighton 703 2,791 24
34 Lexington 3583 5,526 24
35 Quincy 418004 4,280 23
36 Brookline 4009 3,865 22
37 Cambridge 3532 4,897 22
38 Cambridge 352101 1,654 22
39 Shrewsbury 7391 9,557 22
40 Westborough 7612 5,780 22
City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Irish
South Boston 60101 3,106 68
Milton 416400 6,069 63
Charlestown 040401 2,439 63
Dorchester 1007 4,322 63
South Boston 608 3,964 62
South Boston 604 4,904 61
Milton 416101 5,724 58
Marshfield 506204 4,886 57
Weymouth 422100 5,293 57
Quincy 417801 5,443 55
Hull 500101 3,702 55
Scituate 505101 3,860 55
West Roxbury 130402 4,637 54
Quincy 417400 2,566 53
South Boston 60301 3,076 52
Abington 520100 6,458 52
Braintree 419200 5,002 52
Braintree 419600 6,766 52
Abington 520201 3,952 52
Pembroke 508200 6,031 52
City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Italian
Johnston 012402 2,486 63
Cranston 014501 5,179 58
Johnston 012500 5,490 57
Johnston 012200 7,187 57
Providence 011902 4,780 55
Cranston 014800 5,591 55
Saugus 208102 3,343 51
Cranston 014300 4,716 49
Cranston 014600 6,991 49
Cranston 014502 4,096 48
Johnston 012300 6,656 48
Johnston 012401 6,950 48
Stoneham 337102 5,042 45
Stoneham 337202 4,849 45
Revere 170200 4,564 45
Revere 170502 2,818 43
Cranston 013900 2,992 43
Revere 170300 9,040 43
North Providence 012103 2,965 43
City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % Portuguese
New Bedford 652800 3,277 72
Fall River 640600 4,450 69
Dartmouth 653203 5,005 65
New Bedford 652400 2,664 64
New Bedford 652000 2,676 62
Fall River 640500 5,165 60
Fall River 641200 2,803 59
New Bedford 650500 3,141 58
Fall River 640901 5,071 58
New Bedford 650400 3,773 57
New Bedford 652500 2,589 56
East Providence 010400 6,661 55
New Bedford 652300 2,870 54
Fall River 641000 2,419 54
Fall River 640300 3,693 53
Westport 646101 7,356 53
Fall River 640700 2,900 53
Fall River 640400 2,682 53
New Bedford 650101 5,753 53
Fall River 640100 5,358 52
City or Neighborhood Census Tract Population % French
Woonsocket 018500 2,831 66
Woonsocket 017700 3,518 61
Woonsocket 017500 3,128 59
Woonsocket 017800 2,514 58
Burrillville 013001 3,479 56
North Smithfield 012802 2,391 54
North Smithfield 012803 4,776 53
Burrillville 013002 7,539 53
North Smithfield 012801 4,800 52
Manchester 002300 3,758 52
Woonsocket 017900 3,049 51
Burrillville 012900 4,937 50
Manchester 000202 2,297 49
Manchester 002100 4,782 49
Woonsocket 017600 2,560 49
Manchester 002600 5,746 48
Manchester 002200 3,232 47
Woonsocket 018400 6,527 47
Blackstone 747101 5,110 47
Woonsocket 018000 2,680 46
Climate data for Concord Municipal Airport, New Hampshire (1981−2010 normals,[a] extremes 1903–present)[b]
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 72
(22)
74
(23)
89
(32)
95
(35)
98
(37)
101
(38)
102
(39)
101
(38)
98
(37)
92
(33)
80
(27)
73
(23)
102
(39)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 50.8
(10.4)
53.7
(12.1)
66.6
(19.2)
81.5
(27.5)
88.7
(31.5)
92.0
(33.3)
93.1
(33.9)
91.8
(33.2)
87.7
(30.9)
78.5
(25.8)
68.7
(20.4)
56.0
(13.3)
95.5
(35.3)
Average high °F (°C) 30.8
(−0.7)
34.9
(1.6)
43.8
(6.6)
57.4
(14.1)
68.9
(20.5)
77.4
(25.2)
82.3
(27.9)
80.9
(27.2)
72.6
(22.6)
60.5
(15.8)
48.4
(9.1)
36.3
(2.4)
58.0
(14.4)
Average low °F (°C) 10.4
(−12.0)
13.8
(−10.1)
22.5
(−5.3)
32.7
(0.4)
42.6
(5.9)
52.5
(11.4)
57.7
(14.3)
56.1
(13.4)
47.4
(8.6)
35.8
(2.1)
28.2
(−2.1)
17.2
(−8.2)
34.8
(1.6)
Mean minimum °F (°C) −11.2
(−24.0)
−8.2
(−22.3)
0.8
(−17.3)
19.4
(−7.0)
28.1
(−2.2)
37.9
(3.3)
45.4
(7.4)
42.0
(5.6)
31.8
(−0.1)
21.2
(−6.0)
11.1
(−11.6)
−2.8
(−19.3)
−14.6
(−25.9)
Record low °F (°C) −35
(−37)
−37
(−38)
−20
(−29)
4
(−16)
21
(−6)
30
(−1)
35
(2)
29
(−2)
20
(−7)
10
(−12)
−17
(−27)
−24
(−31)
−37
(−38)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 2.70
(69)
2.62
(67)
3.27
(83)
3.41
(87)
3.66
(93)
3.69
(94)
3.74
(95)
3.18
(81)
3.38
(86)
4.04
(103)
3.72
(94)
3.20
(81)
40.61
(1,033)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 18.1
(46)
12.3
(31)
11.1
(28)
2.8
(7.1)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
trace 2.6
(6.6)
14.5
(37)
61.4
(156)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 10.8 9.5 11.5 11.8 12.4 12.7 10.9 9.8 9.3 10.1 11.2 10.9 130.9
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 8.2 6.5 5.3 1.2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.9 6.6 29.7
Average relative humidity (%) 67.9 66.0 64.8 62.0 65.0 70.9 71.8 74.5 76.3 72.8 73.3 72.3 69.8
Mean monthly sunshine hours 162.8 171.8 210.5 223.2 258.4 274.3 295.8 261.9 214.7 183.4 127.8 134.8 2,519.4
Percent possible sunshine 56 58 57 56 57 60 64 61 57 54 44 48 56
Source: NOAA (relative humidity and sun 1961–1990)[37][38][39]
Climate data for Boston (Logan Airport), 1981−2010 normals[c], extremes 1872−present[d]
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 72
(22)
73
(23)
89
(32)
94
(34)
97
(36)
100
(38)
104
(40)
102
(39)
102
(39)
90
(32)
83
(28)
76
(24)
104
(40)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 56.4
(13.6)
57.7
(14.3)
67.6
(19.8)
80.7
(27.1)
87.3
(30.7)
92.1
(33.4)
94.9
(34.9)
93.3
(34.1)
87.9
(31.1)
79.1
(26.2)
70.5
(21.4)
61.3
(16.3)
96.2
(35.7)
Average high °F (°C) 35.8
(2.1)
38.7
(3.7)
45.4
(7.4)
55.6
(13.1)
66.0
(18.9)
75.9
(24.4)
81.4
(27.4)
79.6
(26.4)
72.4
(22.4)
61.4
(16.3)
51.5
(10.8)
41.2
(5.1)
58.8
(14.9)
Daily mean °F (°C) 29.0
(−1.7)
31.7
(−0.2)
38.3
(3.5)
48.1
(8.9)
57.9
(14.4)
67.7
(19.8)
73.4
(23.0)
72.1
(22.3)
64.9
(18.3)
54.0
(12.2)
44.7
(7.1)
34.7
(1.5)
51.5
(10.8)
Average low °F (°C) 22.2
(−5.4)
24.7
(−4.1)
31.1
(−0.5)
40.6
(4.8)
49.9
(9.9)
59.5
(15.3)
65.4
(18.6)
64.6
(18.1)
57.4
(14.1)
46.5
(8.1)
38.0
(3.3)
28.2
(−2.1)
44.1
(6.7)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 4.1
(−15.5)
8.5
(−13.1)
14.7
(−9.6)
30.7
(−0.7)
40.8
(4.9)
49.6
(9.8)
57.3
(14.1)
55.4
(13.0)
45.8
(7.7)
34.9
(1.6)
24.2
(−4.3)
11.1
(−11.6)
2.3
(−16.5)
Record low °F (°C) −13
(−25)
−18
(−28)
−8
(−22)
11
(−12)
31
(−1)
41
(5)
50
(10)
46
(8)
34
(1)
25
(−4)
−2
(−19)
−17
(−27)
−18
(−28)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.36
(85)
3.25
(83)
4.32
(110)
3.74
(95)
3.49
(89)
3.68
(93)
3.43
(87)
3.35
(85)
3.44
(87)
3.94
(100)
3.99
(101)
3.78
(96)
43.77
(1,112)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 12.9
(33)
10.9
(28)
7.8
(20)
1.9
(4.8)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
trace 1.3
(3.3)
9.0
(23)
43.8
(111)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 11.3 9.8 11.6 11.2 12.0 10.9 9.6 9.4 8.6 9.4 10.6 11.6 126.0
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 6.7 5.3 4.2 0.7 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 0.8 4.6 22.4
Average relative humidity (%) 62.3 62.0 63.1 63.0 66.7 68.5 68.4 70.8 71.8 68.5 67.5 65.4 66.5
Mean monthly sunshine hours 163.4 168.4 213.7 227.2 267.3 286.5 300.9 277.3 237.1 206.3 143.2 142.3 2,633.6
Percent possible sunshine 56 57 58 57 59 63 65 64 63 60 49 50 59
Source: NOAA (relative humidity and sun 1961−1990)[41][42][43]
Climate data for Providence, Rhode Island (T. F. Green Airport), 1981–2010 normals,[e] extremes 1904–present[f]
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 69
(21)
72
(22)
90
(32)
98
(37)
96
(36)
98
(37)
102
(39)
104
(40)
100
(38)
88
(31)
81
(27)
77
(25)
104
(40)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 57.2
(14.0)
58.3
(14.6)
68.4
(20.2)
80.3
(26.8)
86.2
(30.1)
91.3
(32.9)
94.5
(34.7)
92.3
(33.5)
87.0
(30.6)
78.1
(25.6)
70.0
(21.1)
60.8
(16.0)
96.2
(35.7)
Average high °F (°C) 37.4
(3.0)
40.3
(4.6)
47.8
(8.8)
58.6
(14.8)
68.4
(20.2)
77.5
(25.3)
82.8
(28.2)
81.4
(27.4)
74.2
(23.4)
63.3
(17.4)
53.2
(11.8)
42.3
(5.7)
60.6
(15.9)
Average low °F (°C) 21.0
(−6.1)
23.6
(−4.7)
30.0
(−1.1)
39.6
(4.2)
48.6
(9.2)
58.4
(14.7)
64.2
(17.9)
63.2
(17.3)
55.3
(12.9)
43.9
(6.6)
35.7
(2.1)
26.3
(−3.2)
42.5
(5.8)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 2.9
(−16.2)
7.7
(−13.5)
14.7
(−9.6)
28.8
(−1.8)
36.9
(2.7)
47.1
(8.4)
55.0
(12.8)
52.4
(11.3)
42.2
(5.7)
31.2
(−0.4)
21.7
(−5.7)
10.4
(−12.0)
0.9
(−17.3)
Record low °F (°C) −13
(−25)
−17
(−27)
1
(−17)
11
(−12)
29
(−2)
39
(4)
48
(9)
40
(4)
32
(0)
20
(−7)
6
(−14)
−12
(−24)
−17
(−27)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.86
(98)
3.29
(84)
5.01
(127)
4.36
(111)
3.55
(90)
3.64
(92)
3.29
(84)
3.60
(91)
3.92
(100)
3.93
(100)
4.51
(115)
4.22
(107)
47.18
(1,198)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 9.0
(23)
8.5
(22)
5.5
(14)
0.6
(1.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
1.5
(3.8)
8.7
(22)
33.8
(86)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 10.9 9.7 11.9 11.3 12.0 10.9 9.4 9.0 8.7 9.4 10.1 11.6 124.9
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 5.7 4.6 3.5 0.4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.6 3.9 18.7
Average relative humidity (%) 63.9 63.0 62.9 61.4 66.6 70.1 71.0 72.5 73.0 70.2 68.9 67.0 67.5
Mean monthly sunshine hours 171.7 172.6 215.6 225.1 254.9 274.1 290.6 262.8 233.0 208.7 148.0 148.6 2,605.7
Percent possible sunshine 58 58 58 56 57 60 63 61 62 61 50 52 58
Source: NOAA (relative humidity and sun 1961–1990),[45][46][47]
Region of Greater Boston
Counties
Major cities
Cities and towns
100k-250k
Cities and towns
25k-100k
Cities and towns
10k-25k
Sub-regions
Topics
Society
Regions
Counties
Cities
Topics
Regions
Counties
Cities
Towns
Townships
Topics
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The 100 most populous metropolitan statistical areas of the United States of America
Major metropolitan areas
(over 1,000,000)
Other cities
(over 100,000)

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