Gravesham

Gravesham (/ˈɡreɪvʃəm/ GRAYV-shəm) is a local government district with borough status in north-west Kent, England. Its administrative centre[1] and largest town is Gravesend, which was known as Gravesham in ancient times.

Gravesham was formed on 1 April 1974 by the merger of the Municipal Borough of Gravesend with Northfleet Urban District and part of Strood Rural District, under the Local Government Act 1972. It borders the Borough of Dartford and Sevenoaks District to the west, the Borough of Tonbridge and Malling to the south, the Medway unitary authority to the east and the Thurrock unitary authority of Essex to the north, via the River Thames.

Gravesham is twinned with Cambrai in Picardy, France. The present borders of Gravesham parliamentary constituency are almost the same as those of the borough.

Gravesham

Borough of Gravesham
Gravesham located within Kent
Gravesham located within Kent
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Constituent countryEngland
Non-metropolitan countyKent
StatusBorough
Admin HQGravesend
Incorporated1 April 1974
Government
 • TypeNon-metropolitan District Council
 • BodyGravesham Borough Council
 • LeadershipMember of Parliament (Conservative)
 • MPAdam Holloway
Area
 • Total38.23 sq mi (99.02 km2)
Area rank216th (of 317)
Population
 (mid-2018 est.)
 • Total106,385
 • Rank224th (of 317)
 • Density2,800/sq mi (1,100/km2)
 • Ethnicity
87.8% White
8.5% S.Asian
1.4% Black
1.3% Mixed Race
1.0% Chinese or Other
Time zoneUTC0 (GMT)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+1 (BST)
ONS code29UG (ONS)
E07000109 (GSS)
OS grid referenceTQ647740
Websitewww.gravesham.gov.uk

History

Robert Heath Hiscock LL.B., F.S.A., Chairman of the Gravesend Historical Society, in the foreword to his book, 'A History of Gravesend' (Phillimore, 1976) wrote:

"The name Gravesham appears only in the Domesday Book, 1086, and was probably the error of a Norman scribe. It was 'Gravesend' in the Domesday Monarchorum c.1100, and 'Gravesende' in the Textus Roffensis c. 1100. It is strange that this "clerical error" should now have been adopted as the name of the new Council".

Housing and architecture

Housing varies from mid rise to low rise, particularly in the villages. The district has 12 buildings listed in the highest category of the national grading system, Grade I, three of which are private residences:

  • Gadshill Place in Higham
  • Luddesdown Court in Luddesdown
  • Nurstead Court in Meopham

Cobham Hall, also in the highest architectural category,[2] is a stately home which was formerly the seat of the Earls of Darnley: since 1965 it has been an independent girls' school. Cobham Park is Grade II*-listed which is listed separately in the gardens and parklands category of classification approved by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport;[3] and includes the remains of a Roman villa.[4][5]

The other Grade I-listed buildings in the borough comprise its ancient parish churches.

See also

References

  1. ^ Reserved, Gravesham Borough Council - All Rights (1 January 2016). "Home". www.gravesham.gov.uk.
  2. ^ Cobham Hall Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1000182)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  3. ^ "Gravesham Listed Building Guidance Notes".
  4. ^ Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1012964)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  5. ^ Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1000182)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 June 2014.

External links

Coordinates: 51°24′32″N 0°23′56″E / 51.409°N 0.399°E

1999 Gravesham Borough Council election

The 1999 Gravesham Borough Council election took place on 6 May 1999 to elect members of Gravesham Borough Council in Kent, England. The whole council was up for election and the Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.

2003 Gravesham Borough Council election

The 2003 Gravesham Borough Council election took place on 1 May 2003 to elect members of Gravesham Borough Council in Kent, England. The whole council was up for election with boundary changes since the last election in 1999. The Labour party stayed in overall control of the council.

2007 Gravesham Borough Council election

The 2007 Gravesham Borough Council election took place on 3 May 2007 to elect members of Gravesham Borough Council in Kent, England. The whole council was up for election and the Conservative party gained overall control of the council from the Labour party.

2011 Gravesham Borough Council election

The 2011 Gravesham Borough Council election took place on 5 May 2011 to elect members of Gravesham Borough Council in Kent, England. The whole council was up for election and the Labour party gained overall control of the council from the Conservative party.

2015 Gravesham Borough Council election

The 2015 Gravesham Borough Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect members of the Gravesham Borough Council in England. It was held on the same day as other local elections. The Conservative Party gained control of the council from the Labour Party.

2019 Gravesham Borough Council election

The 2019 Gravesham Borough Council election took place on 2 May 2019 to elect members of the Gravesham Borough Council in Kent, England. It was held on the same day as other local elections. The Labour Party gained control of the council from the Conservative Party.

Cobham, Kent

Cobham () is a village and civil parish in the Gravesham District of Kent, England. It is located south of Watling Street, the old road from Dover to London, six miles south-east of Gravesend. The hamlet of Sole Street lies within the parish, which covers an area of 1,240 ha and has a population of 1,328. (2001 census), increasing to 1,469 at the 2011 census.The village is in a Conservation Area and as such remains relatively unspoilt. The parish church is 13th century and is dedicated to St Mary Magdalene, and has monumental brasses which are reputedly the finest in England. Thirteen of the brasses belong to the years 1320–1529 and commemorate members of the Brooke and Cobham families. The church in Luddesdown, part of the ecclesiastical parish, is dedicated to St Peter and St Paul. Next to the church in the village is Cobham College, a one-time home for secular priests, and now acting as almshouses.

Cobham does not appear as a separate manor in the Domesday Book, so the village and parish were probably established later than 1086. The Cobham family was established here before the reign of King John (who reigned from 1199). Cobham Parish was originally in the ancient hundred of Shamwell.Cobham Hall was the former 17th-century home of the Earls of Darnley: its gardens were designed by Humphry Repton and the surrounding woods contain the Darnley Mausoleum, a Grade I listed building now undergoing restoration. The Earls of Darnley left in 1957, and since 1962, the Hall has been a public school for girls (Cobham Hall School); it opens to the public on some occasions in the year.

There are two areas of open space in the parish: Cobham Park, which includes extensive woodlands; and Jeskyns, a one-time farm of 360 acres (147 ha), which has been turned into a greenspace area by the Forestry Commission.

Cobham has strong links with Charles Dickens, who used to walk out to the village: he set part of The Pickwick Papers there. Other personalities connected with Cobham include Sir Joseph Williamson, and the insane artist Richard Dadd, who murdered his father near here in 1843. The Hon Ivo Bligh, who became the 8th Earl of Darnley, was the first English cricket captain to attempt to recover The Ashes from Australia in the late 19th century. Comedian Joe Pasquale lives in the area and owns land adjoining the estate of Cobham Hall.

The village was also linked to its namesake HMS Cobham, a Ham-class minesweeper which was an active Royal Navy vessel between 1953 and 1966.

DA postcode area

The DA postcode area, also known as the Dartford postcode area, is a group of eighteen postcode districts in England, which are subdivisions of eleven post towns. These postcode districts cover parts of south-east London and north-west Kent.

The main sorting office in Dartford ceased operating in 2012 and became a Delivery Office. The area served includes most of the London Borough of Bexley and very small parts of the London Borough of Bromley and the Royal Borough of Greenwich, while in Kent it covers almost all of the Borough of Dartford, most of the Gravesham district, the northeastern part of the Sevenoaks district and a very small part of the borough of Tonbridge and Malling.

Grade II* listed buildings in Kent

The county of Kent is divided into 13 districts. The districts of Kent are Ashford, Canterbury, Dartford, Dover, Folkestone and Hythe, Gravesham, Maidstone, Medway, Tonbridge and Malling, Tunbridge Wells, Sevenoaks, Swale and Thanet.

As there are 971 Grade II* listed buildings in the county they have been split into separate lists for each district.

Grade II* listed buildings in Ashford (borough)

Grade II* listed buildings in City of Canterbury

Grade II* listed buildings in Dartford (borough)

Grade II* listed buildings in Dover (district)

Grade II* listed buildings in Folkestone and Hythe

Grade II* listed buildings in Gravesham

Grade II* listed buildings in Maidstone (borough)

Grade II* listed buildings in Medway

Grade II* listed buildings in Sevenoaks (district)

Grade II* listed buildings in Swale

Grade II* listed buildings in Thanet

Grade II* listed buildings in Tonbridge and Malling

Grade II* listed buildings in Tunbridge Wells (borough)

Grade I listed buildings in Kent

The county of Kent is divided into 13 districts. The districts of Kent are Ashford, Canterbury, Dartford, Dover, Gravesham, Maidstone, Medway, Tonbridge and Malling, Tunbridge Wells, Sevenoaks, Shepway, Swale and Thanet.

As there are 435 Grade I listed buildings in the county they have been split into separate lists for each district.

Grade I listed buildings in Ashford (borough)

Grade I listed buildings in City of Canterbury

Grade I listed buildings in Dartford (borough)

Grade I listed buildings in Dover (district)

Grade I listed buildings in Gravesham

Grade I listed buildings in Maidstone

Grade I listed buildings in Medway

Grade I listed buildings in Tonbridge and Malling

Grade I listed buildings in Tunbridge Wells (borough)

Grade I listed buildings in Sevenoaks (district)

Grade I listed buildings in Shepway

Grade I listed buildings in Swale

Grade I listed buildings in Thanet

Gravesend

Gravesend is an ancient town in northwest Kent, England, situated 21 miles (35 km) east-southeast of Charing Cross (central London) on the south bank of the Thames Estuary and opposite Tilbury in Essex. Located in the diocese of Rochester, it is the administrative centre of the Borough of Gravesham.

Its geographical situation has given Gravesend strategic importance throughout the maritime and communications history of South East England. A Thames Gateway commuter town, it retains strong links with the River Thames, not least through the Port of London Authority Pilot Station and has witnessed rejuvenation since the advent of High Speed 1 rail services via Gravesend railway station.

Gravesham (UK Parliament constituency)

Gravesham is a constituency in Kent represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2005 by Adam Holloway, a Conservative.

Gravesham Borough Council

Gravesham Borough Council is the local authority for the Borough of Gravesham in Kent.

Gravesham Borough Council elections

Gravesham Borough Council in Kent, England is elected every four years. Since the last boundary changes in 2003, 44 councillors have been elected from 18 wards.

Meopham

Meopham is a large linear village and civil parish in the Borough of Gravesham and ceremonial county of Kent, in England, and lies to the south of Gravesend. The parish covers 6.5 square miles (17 km2), and comprises two villages and two smaller settlements; it has a population of 6,427 increasing slightly to 6,722 at the 2011 census. Meopham is sometimes described as the longest in England although others such as Brinkworth, Wiltshire make the same claim. Meopham is one of the longest linear settlements in Europe, being 7 miles (11 km) in length.

Meopham railway station

Meopham railway station is on the Chatham Main Line in England, serving the village of Meopham, Kent. It is 25 miles 76 chains (41.8 km) down the line from London Victoria and is situated between Longfield and Sole Street.

The station and all trains that call are operated by Southeastern.

The extant station is a prefabricated building erected in 1971 to British Rail's CLASP design.

Northfleet

Northfleet is a town in the Gravesham Borough of Kent. It borders the Dartford Borough. It is immediately west of Gravesend and on a western border has its own railway station about a hundred metres east of Ebbsfleet International railway station.

Northfleet Technology College

Northfleet Technology College (formerly Northfleet School for Boys) is located in Northfleet, Kent. It is an all-boys school that offers secondary education for students aged 11+.

As part of the Building Schools for the Future programme, a new school building was opened in 2010, with state of the art vocational learning areas.

Statue of General Gordon

A bronze statue of General Charles George Gordon by Hamo Thornycroft stands on a stone plinth in the Victoria Embankment Gardens in London. It has been Grade II listed since 1970. A similar statue stands at Gordon Reserve, near Parliament House in Melbourne, Australia, on its original tall plinth.

A different memorial statue by Edward Onslow Ford, depicting Gordon on a camel, stands at Brompton Barracks, Chatham, with another formerly in Khartoum and now at Gordon's School near Woking. There are further memorial statues to Gordon in Aberdeen; in Gravesham, where the full length stone statue depicts Gordon in his army uniform with a sabre; and there is a Grade II listed monument to Gordon in Southampton.

Towns and villages in the Borough of Gravesham
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